Beta
×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

We are sorry to see you leave - Beta is different and we value the time you took to try it out. Before you decide to go, please take a look at some value-adds for Beta and learn more about it. Thank you for reading Slashdot, and for making the site better!

Comments

top

Wikileaks and Democracy In Zimbabwe

The Dodger Europe just called from 1940... (669 comments)

"Because you cannot bring about Democracy by force."

Mr Wowbagger? I have a phone call for you. It's some British guy from 70 years ago asking for a loan? They're apparently involved in some sort of a disagreement with someone called Hilter...

more than 3 years ago
top

Kodak's Patent Spat Threatens Photo Web Sites

The Dodger WHAT'S THE FUCKING PATENT?!?! (171 comments)

Does anyone know what the actual fucking patent is? Anyone? Bueller?

more than 3 years ago
top

CIA Launches WTF To Investigate Wikileaks

The Dodger Re:US Government (402 comments)

Shut up, 007. ;-)

more than 3 years ago
top

WikiLeaks App Removed From Apple Store

The Dodger Assange upset at police report leak (338 comments)

In other news, Assange is suffering a major sense of humour failure over the Guardian publishing details from the leaked police report into his case.

http://www.journalism.co.uk/news/assange-turns-on-the-guardian-over-assault-case-coverage/s2/a542064/

If you're very, very quiet and listen very, very carefully, you might be able to hear the world's tiniest violin playing for Assange. ;-)

more than 3 years ago
top

Bank of America Cuts Off Wikileaks Transactions

The Dodger Re:Email Bank of America here: (467 comments)

Subject: Wikileaks
Your question or comment: To whom it may concern,
I'd just like to say thanks for cutting off Wikileaks funding. Nice move. Keep up the good work!

I don't have any accounts with you but if I ever need to open an account with a US bank, you'll be first on my list!

more than 3 years ago
top

GoldenEye Source Conversion Mod Released

The Dodger Where'd it go? (105 comments)

"I remember spending hours upon hours playing GoldenEye on the N64, and was sad seeing it go."

Where did it go?

more than 3 years ago
top

WikiLeaks Defenders Threaten Amazon

The Dodger First DDoSer arrested (703 comments)

http://www.theregister.co.uk/2010/12/09/wikileaks_ddos_arrest/

It's a pity it's a 16 year old who, arguably, isn't old enough to know better. I'd be happier if it was some 20-odd year old feckless leftie layabout who we could lock up for five years or so to send a message.

In any case, kudos to the Dutch police! I expect we'll see a signifcant drop-off in the DDoS effectiveness as it begins to dawn on people that is' not, actually, the same a sitting down and refusing to move, and that they could actually end up in court.

Hopefully, they'll have gotten some good leads when they took down anonops.net

more than 3 years ago
top

WikiLeaks Defenders Threaten Amazon

The Dodger Re:Inviting prosecution (703 comments)

And approximately what percentage of people who think it's a good idea to DDoS Mastercard/Visa/PayPal/Amazon will have the smarts to do what you suggest?

more than 3 years ago
top

WikiLeaks Defenders Threaten Amazon

The Dodger Re:Inviting prosecution (703 comments)

Who said anything about jailing them? Police have limited resources so it's likely to take a loooooong time to work their way through all those seized computers. :-)

more than 3 years ago
top

WikiLeaks Defenders Threaten Amazon

The Dodger Inviting prosecution (703 comments)

The use of this LOIC tool that this group are encouraging people to download onto their PCs and fire up to launch these DDoS attacks will be easily detectable and tracable. I'm sure that the companies that are being attacked will be keeping records of the malicious traffic, to be passed on to the police who will, in turn, be able to tie the IP addresses back to broadband connections.

So, I wouldn't be surprised if we see raids, confiscation of computer equipment and (in the UK, at least) charges brought under the Computer Misuse Act. I wonder what the average decline in income is, due to one's inability to get certain jobs because of a criminal record.

And, by the way, those who think that they can get away with it by claiming that it must be a virus infection are deluded - forensic examination will reveal the deliberate downloading of the LOIC tool.

more than 3 years ago
top

Wikileaks Founder Arrested In London

The Dodger Assange has been refused bail (1060 comments)

Assange has been "remanded in custody" (i.e. refused bail), pending a hearing on December 14th.

more than 3 years ago
top

X-37B Robotic Space Plane Returns To Earth

The Dodger NINJA ROBOT SPACE PLANES!!! (55 comments)

Anyone who doesn't think that a Robot Space Plane is Cool should not be reading Slashdot! Robot Space Planes are on a par with sharks with frickin' laser beams attached to their heads!

Also, it's no coincidence that the Robot Space Plane returned from orbit in time for Ninja Day. "Unmanned" == invisible crew, and who do we know who can become invisible? Oh yes, it's the Ninjas...

more than 3 years ago
top

Compiling the WikiLeaks Fallout

The Dodger Re:Here is proof (directly from the cables) (833 comments)

Christ, that guy's family back in Iran are fucked.

If I find out where Assange is, my first call will be to the local US embassy to let them know, in the hope they have a CIA wet team handy to deal with him.

more than 3 years ago
top

How Apple Had a Spectacular Year

The Dodger Re:Most US tech companies have become stupid (504 comments)

I'm still "shocked" when apparently leading tech companies fastidiously try to preserve their cash-cows without giving a thought to continuing R&D to replace them. How MBA of them, but clearly they don't get tech." Actually, during my MBA, one of the things I was taught is that, as you say, "it is always better to obsolete your own products than to have your competitors do it for you!

Don't automatically assume that all MBAs are idiots. Much depends on the business school they got their MBA from - not only do the better schools teach a better course but they also are able to select the best from a far larger pool of applicants than the second-rate schools. Also, some of us MBA-types might just jump up and surprise you with the knowledge and experience we acquired during a past life as a techie! ;-)

more than 3 years ago
top

How Apple Had a Spectacular Year

The Dodger Re:I have a question... (504 comments)

The Apple offering (i.e. hardware/OS combination) is generally better (performance, stability) than Windows. It's also the only way to get a MacOS machine, which a lot of people (including me) like.

Whether it will remain the only way of getting MacOS remains to be seen. If Apple are truly unconcerned about cannibalising its existing product lines, they could launch a program to license MacOS to OEMs (with tight restrictions on the hardware platform to ensure that MacOS reliability isn't compromised) and start taking massive bites out of Microsoft's market share. ;-)

more than 3 years ago
top

Modeling Software Showed BP Cement As Unstable

The Dodger Re:Oh, and by the way... (160 comments)

I doubt, to the point of virtual certainty, that the $20bn bought immunity from prosecution.

You asked whether there "some other kind of damages they might've had". They didn't pledge the $20bn to avoid other damages. It's basically protection money, to get Obama off their backs.

As I've pointed out elsewhere, the rhetoric being spouted by Obama was seriously affecting the market's confidence in BP and that was making it difficult for them to raise short-term funding (which is how a company of BP's size operates on a day-to-day basis). There was a real risk that BP could run out of cash - i.e. go bust, essentially.

Now, you expect that sort of lunatic, xenophobic rhetoric from Congress and, even if a couple of representatives from Bumfuck, AZ and Shitsville, TN decide to introduce a bill that would seize all of BP's assets, the markets aren't going to take it seriously...unless it looks like the President might actually sign it into law. The fact that Obama and the White House were demonising the company and blatantly stirring up public opinion by constantly referring to it as "British" Petroleum (it's not been called that since the merger with Amoco over a decade ago) made them nervous.

From the BP board's perspective, there were two issues at stake. Firstly, straightforward survival. Obama had clearly identified BP as a scapegoat. He clearly didn't care whether BP was to blame for the oil spill or not - he needed someone to blame and BP were the prime candidate. Arthur Andersen's experience being scapegoated for the Enron collapse showed that the US government is prepared to effectively lynch a company, even if they're innocent (Arthur Andersen was eventually exonerated by the Supreme Court, by which time it was far, far too late to save the company). BP needed to avoid that at all costs.

The second issue was that BP needed to ensure that it could continue to do business in the US. BP has a huge footprint in the US - more than 40% of BP is what used to be Amoco. If BP didn't placate Obama and get him back on-side, they may well have faced legislation targeting them in the US. That would certainly have had a seriously detrimental impact on their future profitability and may have forced them to sell their US operations at a knockdown price. BP's board probably felt that $20bn over four years was a price worth paying to avoid that.

Ultimately, they went into their meeting with Obama (at which the $20bn was agreed) with a carrot and a stick. The carrot was the $20bn - basically, they agreed to pay the protection money. Sure, no one like to be the victim of a shakedown but shit happens.

The stick was the risk of BP going under. If that happened, the entire cost of the clean-up effort and compensation would have had to be borne by the US government and Obama would have been crucified had it emerged (and the BP board would have made sure it did - in fact, they would have completely trashed him in the press) that he had turned down a $20bn peace offering from a company that was only liable for $75m.

So, end result is that BP eats humble pie and coughs up 18 months' profits spread over four years (and there's a chance that the total compensation bill won't even come to that much), while Obama walked out to tell the press corps that "BP is a strong and viable company and it is in all of our interests that it remain so."

A minor side-effect is that the United States' attractiveness as a place to do business has taken a knock. Multinational corps will be just a little bit more wary of doing business in the United States from now on. If the equivalent of a BP-Amoco merger were to occur today, there's a good chance that the Amoco name would be retained and that it would be given a separate stock market listing, to insulate the parent company from the US' banana republic-style political foaming-at-the-mouth lunacy.

Another impact is that Obama has damaged US-British relations. Remember that, whether you support the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq or not, Britain has been the United States' primary ally in the war on terrorand British troops continue to fight against the Taliban in southern Afghanistan and there are regular deaths (most recently yesterday). This, despite the fact that, in standing alongside the US, Britain has put herself at greater risk of terrorist attack.

Obama's xenophobic approach was a massive slap in the face. You simply do not do that to your closest ally.

So, while it might look like Obama got a good result, the whole thing was, in fact, an unmitigated fuck-up on his part.

about 4 years ago
top

Modeling Software Showed BP Cement As Unstable

The Dodger Re:Sometimes smart people make mistakes (160 comments)

You're missing a fundamental question: When the Halliburton team was asked to go ahead and do the cement job with only six centralizers, did they (a) believe that it was unsafe to do so and (b) tell anyone that they believed it was unsafe?

Their testimony to the Marine Board of Investigation hearings indicates that the answer to both those questions was "No.".

This is all a big Halliburton smokescreen. If you go back through the various statements they've put out since they finally stopped stonewalling back on 30th April, they keep changing their story and attempting to obfuscate the pertinent details.

about 4 years ago
top

Modeling Software Showed BP Cement As Unstable

The Dodger Re:Oh, and by the way... (160 comments)

You mention that an engineer rubber-stamped the change and that the engineering firm ended up being shut down. You don't mention the owner of the hotel.

In the Deepwater Horizon example, Halliburton are the equivalent of the engineering firm and the contractors combined.

about 4 years ago

Submissions

top

Wired rebuts Greenwald's accusations

The Dodger The Dodger writes  |  more than 3 years ago

The Dodger (10689) writes "After Salon's Glenn Greenwald accused Wired of withholding key evidence in the arrest of US Army PFC Bradley Manning for allegedly leaking classified documents to Julian Assange, Wired have responded with a robust, point-by-point rebuttal of Greenwald's accusations, in which they give their reasons for not publishing the now-infamous chat logs in their entirety."
Link to Original Source
top

Julian Assange to be arrested today

The Dodger The Dodger writes  |  more than 3 years ago

The Dodger (10689) writes "The net is closing around Julian Assange. After news emerged yesterday that his Swiss bank account has been frozen, Assange's lawyer told the BBC late last night that he and Mr. Assange were “in the process of making arrangements to meet with the police by consent”. Assange is almost certain to be arrested at the meeting and brought before a court in London in order for bail to be set. No decision will be made at that hearing as to whether he will, in fact, be extradited to Sweden and it seems likely that his lawyers will fight the extradition. However, the longer Assange remains in the UK, the greater the risk that the United States will bring its own extradition proceedings under the 2003 US-UK Extradition Treaty."
Link to Original Source
top

These aren't the chipmunks you're looking for...

The Dodger The Dodger writes  |  more than 5 years ago

The Dodger (10689) writes "A short time ago, in a back yard in New Brunswick, with the aid of a handful of almonds, Chris McVeigh befriended a chipmunk and persuaded it to pose with Star Wars figures. The resulting photographs are now online for our entertainment and amusement."

Journals

The Dodger has no journal entries.

Slashdot Login

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?