Beta
×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

Comments

top

Google's Driverless Cars Capable of Exceeding Speed Limit

TheRealHocusLocus Re:A limit is a limit (473 comments)

If someone stoops to classic, even dramatically ridiculous errors in logic,
yet you totally 'get' what their point is,
and 'get' where they are coming from
(seeing the view and the person behind the view)
is there a Latin phrase for that?
Just simply understanding people?

Blood in the streets!

you actually achieved a slippery slope argument.

Ergo, San Francisco.

3 days ago
top

Google's Driverless Cars Capable of Exceeding Speed Limit

TheRealHocusLocus Three Signs of the Apocalypse (473 comments)

Are these,

I. Google Driverless Cars
II. Ambulance Chasing Google Cars
III. Ambulance Chasing Google Cars with Lawyers Inside

3 days ago
top

The Cost of Caring For Elderly Nuclear Plants Expected To Rise

TheRealHocusLocus Re:Falling energy prices and weak demand? (246 comments)

There are a number of nuclear plants which are not being kept in operation due to the advent of cheap, clean, natural gas.

Yes, such as the Kewaunee Power Station which went offline in 2013 despite that it is in good condition, has maintained a healthy balance sheet, perfect safety record, operating license extended to 2033 ad six months' fuel in the reactor.

All because Dominion is riding the natural gas 'glut' at this brief moment in time. Also, the triggering of decommission status of a nuclear plant releases the funds set aside for that purpose creating a temporary vulture-culture 'industry' that employs many.

But it is all so short-sighted, an act of outright corporate vandalism. One of my working plans if (perhaps when) the economy and grid breaks down or some disaster strikes, was to relocate to Carlton Wis and help to maintain and defend this plant. The defending of operational nuclear power plants being a sensible course of action for any apocalyptic future suggested in the (excellent) novel Lucifer's Hammer.

Now Calrton, Wisconsin would never be a beacon of hope and assured survival in some grid-down scenario, it's just a town that will have to take its chances with the rest.

If there is a dark moral to this story... if you are a goose which lays golden eggs, do not let yourself be acquired by Dominion Energy.

4 days ago
top

The Cost of Caring For Elderly Nuclear Plants Expected To Rise

TheRealHocusLocus Re:Falling energy prices and weak demand? (246 comments)

The politicians have essentially made grid operators pay for the unreliability of wind & solar, instead of the people who actually own the thing and earn money from it. It's like making a public transport company pay for the lost wages of people who continuously oversleep and show up late for work, despite the public transport running on time.

This is the most apt and brilliant analogy for this issue I have yet seen... suitable for framing!

4 days ago
top

Figuring Out Where To Live Using Math

TheRealHocusLocus Re:you must not have done well in math class (213 comments)

What you refuse to accept is that "less" access to guns by bad guys is still ample for them to shoot good defenseless people.

I second this.

Don't forget the (logical, inevitable) outcome of selective criminals-only carry in places with steep and escalating gun crime penalties: defenseless bystanders and potential witnesses -- even those who do not interfere with the perpetrators' exit -- are more likely to be pursued and targeted lethally.

5 days ago
top

Figuring Out Where To Live Using Math

TheRealHocusLocus Re:Check your arithmatic (213 comments)

[to] the sticks to shoot bunnies

How 'bout them bunny etters, ain't they hicks?
Snarfin' them some bunny way out in the sticks.
Shootin' them cottontail, snarin' them hares
Jumpin' them a jackrabbit, nothing compares!
How 'bout them hare flushers, ain't they snappy?
Leapin' lepus in the boonies sure makes 'em happy!
Them hugger-mugger hare raisers way down South
stickin' yummy Hasenpfeffer in they mouth.
How to be a hare-gitter no way to duck it,
Git yerself a hare, stew it and suck it!

~Hat tip to Parent, my own tribute to Mason Williams in the style of Them Poems, esp. "Them Toad Suckers"

5 days ago
top

Floridian (and Southern) Governmental Regulations Are Unfriendly To Solar Power

TheRealHocusLocus Re:Try a TRILLION DOLLARS, for starters. (306 comments)

Geez, you're quoting someone at a thorium power conference? Who cares what his take is?

(Refering to THIS and THIS )... I sure do. Dodson is a bright, outspoken fellow who is working on his Masters in utility Electrical engineering. He has already demonstrated that he has a grasp of the issues surrounding proper impedance matching of transmission lines and power sources. He arrived at the conference with NERC animations showing synchronous resonance occurring on the grid and explains its significance. This is real stuff.

Let's look around and see what we can see... hmmm, Ars has a whole collection:
http://arstechnica.com/science...
http://arstechnica.com/science...
http://arstechnica.com/science...

Yeah, I had to read carefully to make sure they weren't the same article. I can see the folks who gathered these numbers now. They're sitting in cubicles and each article presents an amalgamation of optimistic spreadsheet projections that leverage imagined costs and revenue streams tailored to arrive at a projected goal of 'X" percent renewables. It's money all the way down. Spreadsheet wizards. The planet is awash in such mind games. They're assuming that the grid is some modular component, the perfect sink, that they can click their renewable LEGO pieces into -- perhaps a little column labelled 'retrofit' with a dash of money in it -- and somehow... it will all work. There is a general need for such things but these are suffering from a deficit of engineering reality.

From all I've learned from people working on these problems whom I trust, it won't work. Intermittent sources are polluting the grid in a way that has begin to threaten its stability.

If the country was connected with overlapping rings of HVDC conduit (as it must be some day) then the mere introduction of potential into the ring -- whether it be intermittent or 'noisy' or not -- could happen with near 100% efficiency, AC would be pushed into the legacy grid (which would begin to decouple as the DC feeds become redundant and reliable) -- and ONLY THEN will those spreadsheets work nicely. With a little boost from natural gas here and there. We can even bridge the continents.

This is not that world or that continent, yet. In order to build out our existing resonant AC grid we need to feed it by adding a few, massive generating plants that run 24/7.

Every cent that has been spent attempting to put wind and solar onto the grid has been wasted. Because it has diverted resources away from more serious problems and more sensible approaches.

about two weeks ago
top

Floridian (and Southern) Governmental Regulations Are Unfriendly To Solar Power

TheRealHocusLocus Re:Try a TRILLION DOLLARS, for starters. (306 comments)

I wonder if it's possible at all to just retrofit in a modular way. for example, take 1 power line that goes down a few city blocks and touches 10 stepdown transformers. Could that entire line be taken down along with the transformers and replaced???

IF the area was literally paved with solar and wind, such that its output could not only provide for it completely but with surplus for export, then these resonance effects might be measurable and some adjustment to the original design might improve efficiency.

But the effects that Dodson refers to in the video linked above occur over a much larger region, when large wind turbines create an ebb and flow of hundreds of megawatts at a time, fast ripples in a pond. It's not that the transmission lines cannot handle these variations in flow -- the whole system was designed to remain in near perfect phase except when large, slow and regularly scheduled events 'push' or 'pull' it -- slowly. Only the trip of stations or the gradual rise and fall of loads would affect it. Grid operators and their physical machinery do take kindly to extraordinary, unplanned events and wind power has made every day a cacophony of them.

What you can do at the community level is take advantage of all this great stuff and become more self-sufficient -- help one another to install power sources that begin to take you off the grid for certain things or some of the time. As 'preppers' or 'conservationists' or maybe just for the hellacious fun of it.

In short, leave the government and the grid out of it. We will continue to need reliable power, and the grid is fragile. Paying by the kilowatt-hour to some well-designed, stable entity miles away is not an abomination, it is the best way we've come up with to solve the problem.

The net metering 'fad' with its Federal mandates and subsidies reminds me of the The Bank That Was Sent Through the Post Office back in 1913. 80,000 bricks needed to be moved 120 miles and freight was prohibitive, so this young entrepreneur 'pwned' the Post Office which had recently introduced its Parcel Post service with reasonable rates for packages under 50 pounds. No one believed for a minute that the Post Office should shrug off this large scale abuse and re-tool their organization to subvert the whole idea of bulk freight. But (for a time at least) they were powerless to do anything about it, and the Bank was built. Two hundred tons of bricks by Parcel Post.

Similarly -- it is my belief that given the purpose for which it was designed, and the way it was constructed, the North American Power grid is being abused dangerously by variable energy sources. And we cannot afford, nor should we strive to 'fix' it until we address the more pressing problem -- a lack of sustainable, reliable energy sources.

about two weeks ago
top

Floridian (and Southern) Governmental Regulations Are Unfriendly To Solar Power

TheRealHocusLocus Re:Try a TRILLION DOLLARS, for starters. (306 comments)

With a bit of find and replace
s/Solar{ PV|}/Natural Gas/g

Now your comment makes sense... even at night!

Natural gas is the new darling of base load generation. The only problem being that IF the present burdens of coal is shifted onto it and present coal infrastructure is decommissioned and abandoned, we'll have nothing to fall back on WHEN natural gas peaks and declines.

When considering the relative costs of things I try to factor in whether they will ultimately 'work' at all. Solar PV for base load energy will not work. Therefore it is too expensive, because extinction is expensive.

about two weeks ago
top

Floridian (and Southern) Governmental Regulations Are Unfriendly To Solar Power

TheRealHocusLocus Try a TRILLION DOLLARS, for starters. (306 comments)

Aw C'mon, everybody's whining about the subsidies and 'net metering hardware' that needs to be installed and maintained at each point of presence -- aside from the purchase of the solar and wind units themselves... at the core of it are a few folks discovering that power utilities are not as eager as they like them to be.

For solar It's just a politics-entitlement issue because, frankly, the power these solar installations push back onto the grid is too tiny for the 'trouble' they cause. I am SO GLAD that my small midwest city has none of this DAMNED FOOLISHNESS going on. We can see what our electrical co-ops pay by the kilowatt for reliable grid power and we see the salaries of the fine people who maintain it, and it's pretty much in parity.

The power grid is a massive tuned circuit which uses frequency to regulate power flow. Several regions such as Oklahoma, Florida and the Northeast already contain enough intermittent energy sources to create real problems with distribution, today. Electrical Engineer Andrew Dodson lays out a few of these problems at this fascinating presentation at the recent Thorium Energy Conference in Chicago, showing plots of dissonant waves hundreds of miles across caused by the onset and outset of wind surges. He describes the "single machine infinite bus" model that grid engineers design for and how it is being compromised in this followup interview.

Here is someone who has devoted his career to grid stability, understands it completely -- and what is his own take?

A TRILLION DOLLARS to retrofit the grid to accommodate so-called renewables. That's without putting a single additional megawatt on the grid. He even advocates the build out of a parallel grid for variable sources to protect the essential 24/7 machinery of power generation, which can incur physical damage from these effects -- allowing us to concentrate new infrastructure for tuning reactive load to a few buffer points.

Sounds great down the road. We need reliable baseload power cheaper than coal first.

___
Please see Thorium Remix and my own letters on energy,
To The Honorable James M. Inhofe, United States Senate
To whom it may concern, Halliburton Corporate
Also of interest, Faulkner [2005]: Electric Pipelines for North American Power Grid Efficiency Security

about two weeks ago
top

New Process Promises Ammonia From Air, Water, and Sunlight

TheRealHocusLocus Re:Lose the Solar Cells! Do it with LFTR (117 comments)

With LFTR you would not need to use an expensive and power hogging Reverse Osmosis plant to desalinate seawater. A thorium reactor is an excellent and efficient way to desalinate seawater by the tons per minute. The gigawatts of free power are also a plus.

In Kirk Sorensen's TEAC 2013 presentation he describes using waste heat for this purpose -- showing a concept drawing of a LFTR electric/water plant next to the ocean. Am I certain that LFTR could be sited safely on the shore and be completely submerged by a tsunami or hurricane with no resulting disaster? Absolutely! Would he be able to convince some forward-thinking country such as Qatar to place these in the desert to ensure a source of fresh water in some post-petroleum future? Yep.

What of the United States? I'm afraid that the prospect of siting a new nuclear project on the coast -- or more generally, any parcel of land that would be contested by locals -- is remote. The regions which surround lakes, rivers and coastline are completely settled (and defended) by people.

My idea is to build out LFTR inland in areas less likely to be contested by humans, such as along existing cross-country transmission line corridors, in compact configurations that might even fit within the cleared right-of-way path directly beneath them; multiple 1GW reactors sharing turbine and active fuel reprocessing infrastructure.

My hope is to place such a surplus of power onto the grid that by the ocean even 'wasteful' reverse osmosis techniques or some scale-up of vacuum desalinization might be practical... and acceptable to the locals.

___
Please see Thorium Remix and my own letters on energy,
To The Honorable James M. Inhofe, United States Senate
To whom it may concern, Halliburton Corporate
Also of interest, Faulkner [2005]: Electric Pipelines for North American Power Grid Efficiency Security

about two weeks ago
top

Brookings Study Calls Solar, Wind Power the Most Expensive Fossil Alternatives

TheRealHocusLocus Re:Oddly nobody factors in risk and after costs (409 comments)

on 9/11 the terrorists actually flew past indian point nuke plant to get to the trade center

Or... how about the plane that flew right past the Statue of Liberty to attack the second Trade Center tower?

Or... how about the Pentagon plane which executed a complex maneuver to hit the segment of the building that had recently been renovated and reinforced... to better withstand... a plane?

Imagine that -- "They hate our freedom" and yet spared Lady Liberty. This official conspiracy theory is coming apart at the seams. Toto, I get the feeling we are not talking about those terrorists anymore.

about two weeks ago
top

Brookings Study Calls Solar, Wind Power the Most Expensive Fossil Alternatives

TheRealHocusLocus Finally!! (409 comments)

A Think Tank chock full O' Think.

I like it.

about two weeks ago
top

New Process Promises Ammonia From Air, Water, and Sunlight

TheRealHocusLocus Lose the Solar Cells! Do it with LFTR (117 comments)

When I hear about clever-but low energy processes that have low yield because -- and only because -- the scientists feel the need toss a stock photo of a windmill or solar cell into the paper to trigger that warm fuzzy feeling, I think to myself, "How cute."

Decades of cuteness now. It's not cute any more.

The world needs less cuteness and more large scale thinking. Gigawatts not milliwatts. We also need to get into reverse osmosis in a big way, so we can start to manufacture fresh water from salt and pipe it inland. This requires massive amounts of energy.

Real Humans do not need to wait for rain, real humans need not wait for oil and gas to diminish in order to achieve the next step. Real humans better wake up and resume the industrial revolution. We are smart enough to keep it clean.

Follow us down the rabbit hole...

about two weeks ago
top

People Who Claim To Worry About Climate Change Don't Cut Energy Use

TheRealHocusLocus Re:user error (710 comments)

For example, most self proclaimed environmentalists I know leave their computers running 24/7 and deliberately disable the standby features. I myself have all of my machines configured to enter S4 after 15 minutes of no activity.

Running a computer 24/7 minimizes the minimum/maximum temperature range to which its components are exposed. I also run hard disks 24/7 with spin-down disabled to maximize their lifespan. Always keep hard disks oriented horizontal, not because of the bearing -- do it to ensure that heat rises uniformly from its surface. For my external hard disks, I ALWAYS take them apart and burn additional holes in the top and bottom with a soldering iron for increased airflow, because the folks that assemble them no longer give a damn about operating temperature.

These are 21st century 'fails'. Some of us remember a time when all electronic components were properly spec'd and given a generous amount of airflow, and plug-in power adapters were not hot to the touch. I call it predatory engineering.

I consider a healthy computer to be an integral part of my environment, and I'm very environmentally conscious.

about a month ago
top

Take a Picture Just By Thinking About It, Using Google Glass With MindRDR App

TheRealHocusLocus Re:No thank you (41 comments)

Reading your thoughts is not the scary bit.

"Hey, you're wearing one of those EEG thingies right?"
"Yup."
"Remember... when you posted that photo of your lawn the other day?"
"Sure do."
"Right... golly, it worked! It's coming in now. I see you are... sitting on the toilet? Gross!"
"Hey!"
"And just THINK... all you had to do was REMEMBER!"
"Cut it out!!"
"Oh look, another one. You let your dog watch you poop?"
[xxxxxx] has left the chatroom

Why use a side channel attack when a direct approach also works.

about a month ago
top

Public To Vote On Names For Exoplanets

TheRealHocusLocus The next one: PLUTO (127 comments)

To atone... and hide our shame.

about a month ago
top

NSA Says Snowden Emails Exempt From Public Disclosure

TheRealHocusLocus Re:"unwarranted invasion of personal privacy" (231 comments)

And yet they don't seem to have any problem violating the fundamental rights of nearly everyone in and outside the US.

That is because blah blah blah NO blah blah NATIONAL SECURITY blah blah SHUT THE HELL UP.

Thar be dragins.

about a month ago
top

Fighting Climate Change With Trade

TheRealHocusLocus Re:What! A reasonable plan for alien invasion!?!?! (155 comments)

Good step: Offer to eliminate tariffs on solar panels and other things.
Good step: Get behind building LOTS of modern nuclear plants. LOTS.
Good step: Get behind building LOTS of electric cars, and the technology to increase batteries' energy density.

Three great steps!

As to "and other things..." I have always favored a move in the direction of free trade in all things, as Jefferson (not Hamilton) intended. In modern context this involves rolling back tariffs altogether, including ones for which a reciprocal arrangement exists, with the objective of simplifying things in general, and Federal law in particular. Henry George's 1886 treatise Protection or Free Trade remains as relevant and thought-provoking as ever. I agree with other posters who have said that tariffs are a market distortion -- and would add that selective tariffs by technology category (within the classification of power generation) are an even more awful distortion. You're taking the rudder from market forces -- which reflect a combination of necessity and desire -- and placing it into the hands of those who get to decide what is save-de-planet environmental and what is not.

I consider the present worldwide system of tariffs a form of pollution and wasted energy. I believe the only sustainable form of wealth creation is meaningful innovation, not the borderline kind that results from some tech firm beating another to the patent office. I mean something new that can reduce the cost of living by reducing expenses. My chosen (workable) path is to reduce the cost of grid electricity delivered (and remaining hydrocarbons extracted) in North America by harnessing Thorium.

And it so happens that NOT ONE of those politically correct green solutions generates the base load energy necessary to survive a harsh Winter, let alone grow. It really has been two decades of bad road. "Cheaper" Chinese solar panels or wind turbines will not keep us all alive during a continent-wide hard freeze. Until the "Green" parties of the world agree on a some method of generating an incredible amount of energy 24x7 reliably, something that will work, we're screwed.

Suggest plans for it that everyone can support. Leave the death threats at home. ; )

Okay. Remember in all of this... NO PRESSURE!

It's fun to discuss nuclear energy on Slashdot ... sometimes you just have to point things out point by point ... some confuse Weinberg's '300 year best-fit for waste' two fluid design for other single fluid designs ... or using solid fuel Thorium, which is pointless so long as uranium is available ... yes it's full of dangerous glop, but it is useful and happy glop ... yes, I think a LFTR could be developed and built within $4B ... every path to biofuels leads to scorched-earth disaster, Thorium energy gives us the surplus to generate synfuels ... a move to LFTR may be the only way to preserve modern society in the face of disaster (volcanism, Maunder minimum) ... utility-scale so-called 'renewables' non-solutions have a gazillion points of failure, gigawatt LFTR plants few, and it is my belief they will save NOT fail us ... aside from your own yard or roof, solar and wind are losers ... with LFTR surplus we could begin making diesel and fertilizer ... do it for the children ... and you my friend -- you would look especially good in space ... an Admiral Rickover fact check (severe tire damage) ... LNT (linear no threshhold) needs re-examination ... no I'm not risk adverse, just risk conscious ... one must sift past the fear-hype, especially regards Fukushima ... a look at Electricity in the Time of Cholera ... on the new coal powered IBM Power8 chips ... Thorium lays on its back, its belly baking in the hot sun, beating its legs trying to turn itself over, but it can't. Not without your help.

Think of me as the Trix Rabbit of Thorium.

___
Please see Thorium Remix and my own letters on energy,
  To The Honorable James M. Inhofe, United States Senate
  To whom it may concern, Halliburton Corporate
Also of interest, Faulkner [2005]: Electric Pipelines for North American Power Grid Efficiency Security

about a month ago

Submissions

top

Death to the Trapezoid.. Small aggravations and big 'fails'

TheRealHocusLocus TheRealHocusLocus writes  |  about 9 months ago

TheRealHocusLocus (2319802) writes "Extreme bandwidth is nice, intelligent power management is cool... but folks should be spilling into the streets in thankful praise that the next generation miniature USB connector will fit either way. All told-- just how many intricate miracle devices have been scrapped in their prime — because a tiny USB port was mangled? For millennia untold chimpanzees and people have been poking termite mounds with round sticks. I for one am glad to see round stick technology make its way into consumer electronics. Death to the trapezoid, bring back the rectangle! So... since we're on roll here... how many other tiny annoyances that lead to big fails are out there?"
top

The Dismantling of POTS: bold move or grave error?

TheRealHocusLocus TheRealHocusLocus writes  |  about 9 months ago

TheRealHocusLocus (2319802) writes "The FCC is drafting rules to formalize the process of transition of "last-mile" subscriber circuits to digital IP-based data streams. The move is lauded by AT&T Chairman Tom Wheeler who claims that significant resources are spent to maintain 'legacy' POTS service, though some 100 million still use it. POTS, or 'Plain Old Telephone Service' is the analog standard that allows the use of simple unpowered phone devices on the wire, with the phone company supplying ring and talk voltage. I cannot fault progress, in fact I'm part of the problem: I gave up my dial tone a couple years ago because I needed cell and could not afford to keep both. But what concerns me is, are we poised to dismantle systems that are capable of standing alone to keep communities and regions 'in-touch' with each other, in favor of systems that rely on centralized (and distant) points of failure? Despite its analog limitations POTS switches have enforced the use of hard-coded local exchanges and equipment that will faithfully complete local calls even if its network connections are down. But do these IP phones deliver the same promise? For that matter, is any single local cell tower isolated from its parent network of use to anyone at all? I have had a difficult time finding answers to this question, and would love savvy /. folks to weigh in: In a disaster that isolates the community from outside or partitions the country's connectivity — aside from local Plain Old Telephone Service, how many IP and cell phones would continue to function? Are we setting ourselves up for a 'fail'?"
top

If ONLY Compact Flourescernt Bulbs are lighting this room, right now...

TheRealHocusLocus TheRealHocusLocus writes  |  about 10 months ago

TheRealHocusLocus (2319802) writes "POLL IDEA

* They better for me AND I want to threaten everyone to use them with a stick
* Illumination is BETTER than incandescent bulbs
* No difference, who cares
* Illumination is WORSE than incandescent bulbs
* Worse for me AND I want to break them all with a stick
* Naver mind this bulb business, I just want to use the stick
* Disqualified: I have an incandescent desk lamp, I am blind or all my bulbs have burned out"
top

Breakthrough: Manned Space Travel Achieved Using 40-Year Old Technology

TheRealHocusLocus TheRealHocusLocus writes  |  about a year ago

TheRealHocusLocus (2319802) writes "Paul Rosenberg has uncovered some surprising new evidence that manned space travel is not only possible, it has actually been achieved using decades-old technology. Some 40 years in the making, a tale too amazing to remain untold. With a few quaint photographs he asks, could we build this? The answer is no. Or is it? It is uplifting to read that "Productive humans have been delegated to mute observance as their hard-earned surplus is syphoned off to capital cities, where it is sanctimoniously poured down a sewer of cultured dependencies and endless wars..." for it must take something really compelling to prevent us from reaching the stars, and he has nailed it. This essay makes the case that the headliner of 2052 may well be: Breakthrough: Manned Space Travel Achieved Using 80-Year Old Technology. I can hardly wait! Down with robots."
Link to Original Source
top

The future of energy must be crowdsourced, needs your help

TheRealHocusLocus TheRealHocusLocus writes  |  about a year ago

TheRealHocusLocus (2319802) writes "It wants to power our grid — completely. It wants to eat our existing nuclear waste, all of it. It does not want to explode or release radioactivity via steam or overpressure. Oil companies are trying to make you fear it (duh). The Big Nuclear Industry will not touch it because it eats anything, and they cannot lock you in to a solid fuel contract. Environmentalists are still confusing it with 'traditional' melt boom irradiate nuclear power technology. Kirk Sorensen wants to tell you about it. TFA is two hours long but there is not a idle moment in here, it's a mini physics course in itself. This is all about keeping the lights on, surviving the Winter, keeping our technological lead."
Link to Original Source
top

How 'hackable' is EAS? This just in: Zombie acopalypse in Montanna

TheRealHocusLocus TheRealHocusLocus writes  |  about a year and a half ago

TheRealHocusLocus (2319802) writes "Perhaps uncoincidentally with the Walking Dead's return on AMC, unknown persons have managed to inject a fake EAS (Emergency Alert System) message into the stream of KRTV in Great Falls, Montana. From CONELRAD [1951-1963] to EBS [1963-1997] to modern EAS, the US has had infrastructure in place for an attention signal to alert a hierarchical network of broadcast stations. In 1979 I conducted weekly EBS tests at a small FM station which always required direct operator action. But now so many stations run unattended, it is surprising incidents like this do not happen more often. But this begs the age old question: how could you secure such a network without introducing excessive complexity, reducing reliability?"
Link to Original Source
top

Only two real challenges face us today, besides restraint (for comment)

TheRealHocusLocus TheRealHocusLocus writes  |  about a year and a half ago

TheRealHocusLocus (2319802) writes "There are only two real challenges to face in this world.

There is only only one doomsday scenario that requires us to come together and take action to ensure our survival: to deploy technology that can identify, then divert or destroy asteroids on a course to impact our planet.

There is only one actual piece of social engineering that needs to occur to ensure our survival: to marginalize the opposition to nuclear energy and to build and scale up efficient and safe modern designs to completely power our electric grids with enough surplus energy for electric ground transportation, trains, cars and trucks. To gather and store the nuclear waste responsibly until breeder technology matures. The developing world wants electric grids (not our charity dollars), in the developed world the grids are the only thing between us and the dark ages. Coal, oil and gas harm the environment and their depletion curves yield a perpetual resource war and eventual doom. Disaster-hardened underground nuclear reactors hold the ONLY real promise we have for continued existence in the style to which we are accustomed.

That's it. Only two challenges. All the rest are matters that may be solved with restraint.

This practice of taking issues such as violence and war or drug abuse or overpopulation, and treating them as 'disasters' and not issues of restraint — worries me. It is a grave mental disorder to portray them as anything more than they are, simple issues of personal restraint.

John Galt's motor does not exist. Fusion even if it proves possible will not be scalable soon enough. Hydrogen is a great fuel for transportation but it requires energy for harvest. Nuclear fission is the *only* energy source that could keep us alive through a long dark winter so it must be pursued — until it is perfected, to the exclusion of everything else.

In other words, GROW UP humanity, this little recess from technological innovation while we burn off the oil and turn away from danger in the sky, is over. It's time to get back to work."

Journals

TheRealHocusLocus has no journal entries.

Slashdot Login

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?

Submission Text Formatting Tips

We support a small subset of HTML, namely these tags:

  • b
  • i
  • p
  • br
  • a
  • ol
  • ul
  • li
  • dl
  • dt
  • dd
  • em
  • strong
  • tt
  • blockquote
  • div
  • quote
  • ecode

"ecode" can be used for code snippets, for example:

<ecode>    while(1) { do_something(); } </ecode>