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Comments

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Government To Require Vehicle-to-vehicle Communication

TheVelvetFlamebait I've long thought this should happen... (390 comments)

... I just didn't expect it to happen so soon. A mesh network is a natural step to take on the path to fully automating roads and all but eliminating the dangers of the road. Naturally the next step would be to mandate cars to participate in the network, to get the best data. I just wasn't predicting it would be in this decade. Mind you, the recent advances in automatic driving without mesh networking has also been surprising, so maybe I should have seen this coming.

I don't know what the submitter is so worried about. This is simply one of the final nails in the coffin of road fatalities.

about 8 months ago
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Now Published: Study Showing Pirate Bay Blockade Has No Effect

TheVelvetFlamebait Re:Non News (127 comments)

You lose many babies, even when trying (even successfully) to conceive. That's not a problem; potential babies are a dime a dozen. We can always just manufacture more, with pleasure!

I can't say the same for potential sales. Once a sale is lost, it's very hard to get back, and impossible to fabricate.

about 8 months ago
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Now Published: Study Showing Pirate Bay Blockade Has No Effect

TheVelvetFlamebait Re:Non News (127 comments)

What's your problem with a rape analogy? If you don't think copyright infringement and rape have common elements, why not argue like a man, instead of down-modding like a coward?

about 8 months ago
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Now Published: Study Showing Pirate Bay Blockade Has No Effect

TheVelvetFlamebait Re:Non News (127 comments)

Something is *created* when copying something.

Indeed. Nothing new. Nothing helpful. Nothing that contributes to our culture or understanding of the world. Nothing that is any good to anyone, except the person who obtains it.

Nothing is *taken*

Ah, this is where you're wrong. The fact that there is a component of creation does not imply there is not a component of taking, or destruction.

about 8 months ago
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Now Published: Study Showing Pirate Bay Blockade Has No Effect

TheVelvetFlamebait Re:Privacy (127 comments)

I run a bittorrent client that downloads torrents at random

That's a helluvan algorithm when you want something specific!

about 8 months ago
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Now Published: Study Showing Pirate Bay Blockade Has No Effect

TheVelvetFlamebait Re:Non News (127 comments)

I think their greed might be clouding their moral judgement.

about 8 months ago
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Now Published: Study Showing Pirate Bay Blockade Has No Effect

TheVelvetFlamebait Re:Non News (127 comments)

Is there much of a moral distinction between copyright infringement and theft? Both involve acquiring something to which you have no right, at the quantifiable detriment to the owner. Is there some other moral dimension to theft of which I'm not aware?

about 8 months ago
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Now Published: Study Showing Pirate Bay Blockade Has No Effect

TheVelvetFlamebait Re:Non News (127 comments)

Not just government-backed, but government-guaranteed. The entire time they were pouring their own money into making this stuff, they were doing so under the assumption that the law saying they would get a monopoly on their particular product would be upheld.

Of course they feel entitled to their monopolies. And, moreover, they are entitled to reparations to those of us who break the monopoly.

about 8 months ago
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Should Everybody Learn To Code?

TheVelvetFlamebait Re:Like music -- it's training for the mind (387 comments)

Coding and music (particularly composition) are excellent for the mind, but not every student has the aptitude. It's not a case of some kids being too dumb, but just that not every mind works that way.

I do think that students should be given the option though.

about 8 months ago
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Should Everybody Learn To Code?

TheVelvetFlamebait Re:HELL NO (387 comments)

If you actually have a talent for writing software, you'll find out automatically.

Bullshit. Kids have no way of recognising that aptitude in themselves. How could they? I find that people who haven't been introduced to computer programming previously have no idea what it entails.

Also, I'd like to point out that programming in school is mostly about structuring your thoughts logically and a feel for how computers work, not professional coding etiquette.

about 8 months ago
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David Cameron Says Fictional Crime Proves Why Snooper's Charter Is Necessary

TheVelvetFlamebait Re:I'm sorry, but (179 comments)

When did "keeping us safe" become the primary function of government?

I'm not sure. When did we invent the military?

about 8 months ago
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David Cameron Says Fictional Crime Proves Why Snooper's Charter Is Necessary

TheVelvetFlamebait Re:It's the JEWS - didn't you notice? (179 comments)

Is that not enough to convince you?

Ahhh, if it's all the same to you, I'm not quite done with my critical reasoning skills yet. But, I promise, the moment I'm done with them, I'll come chase shadows with you on your imaginary demon hunt.

about 8 months ago
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David Cameron Says Fictional Crime Proves Why Snooper's Charter Is Necessary

TheVelvetFlamebait Re:Obvious bias is obvious (179 comments)

Obvious bias is indeed obvious, but, to be fair, it only points out that the reason is stupid, and does not comment on the law itself. It doesn't really need to either, since the /. groupthink will tell 95% of us what to think about it anyway.

about 8 months ago
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David Cameron Says Fictional Crime Proves Why Snooper's Charter Is Necessary

TheVelvetFlamebait Re:The bigger problem (179 comments)

but just check out TV forums and see how many posters refer to actors by their characters' names. For a lot of people, TV is real-life

That might be a bit of a leap there.

When I read a novel, I say/think $CHARACTER did something, even though I know that they don't exist, and I find I do the same in all sorts of entertainment, television included. Also, the names of the characters are a great way to refer to the person without having to memorise their names, or expect others to do so as well.

In fact, come to think about it, I don't know a single person who is even close to thinking that TV is real. I don't even know anyone who thinks it's plausible. Do you?

Sometimes I wonder if "Remember the dumb people" is /.'s "Think of the children".

about 8 months ago
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Edward Snowden and the Death of Nuance

TheVelvetFlamebait Re:Something else entirely? (388 comments)

No, the worst possible thing already happened, thats the content of the letter.

A slight exaggeration perhaps, but it's beside the point. It's not a competition of who can be more wrong; the fact of the matter is that it's possible for two parties to be in the wrong. And in principle, how wrong one party is should not affect how wrong the other party is.

Think about all those legal penalties for spying, warrantless searches, torture, and all those other illegal methods for obtaining potentially valuable information. Not only do we punish people who use them, we refuse to acknowledge, in court, the information obtained using them. Why? Because if we did, then people would continue to do them, regardless of the penalties. It's not enough to say, "Whoops, my bad, but at least you caught the serial kiddie-fiddler due to my illegal search!", and walk out scot-free. Regardless of how useful the information exposed, we know that the methods to obtain said information are evil, and we do our best to ensure they don't happen, even if it means ignoring valuable information. Basically, as far as the courts' are concerned, the ends never justify the means.

(Now, I don't mean to suggest we should ignore what Snowden turned up, just that we shouldn't allow the magnitude of NSA's crimes to blind us to the issue of whether Snowden himself has done wrong or not.)

about 8 months ago
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Edward Snowden and the Death of Nuance

TheVelvetFlamebait Re:This just in... (388 comments)

Only when "propaganda spin-meisters" are crowing away to all who will still listen.

So, your reason for ignoring this part of the debate is because the other side are smelly poopy-faces? These may not be your exact words, but it's certainly the gist that I take from it.

It is not a debate when discourse limited and narrowed to concentrate on the messenger rather than the much more important message.

If you re-read my post, you'll see that I was not even remotely suggesting this. There's nuance here. No, the debate is not entirely the way you want it. No, by debating all of the issues raised, that does not mean we only debate the ones you don't want to. It does not mean we are deflecting the real issues, just addressing the other ones that you don't want to address, which is fine, because the "other side" doesn't necessarily want to address the issues you want to address. That's why you address them all.

Seriously modders, shame on you! I would think directly discussing the topic "The Death of Nuance" would be illuminating enough to stop you modding such dreck up, at least on this story!

about 8 months ago
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Edward Snowden and the Death of Nuance

TheVelvetFlamebait Re:Confused (388 comments)

What do you think this is, a site for techies?

about 8 months ago
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Edward Snowden and the Death of Nuance

TheVelvetFlamebait Re:Death of Meaning (388 comments)

What you're describing is the use of implicit meaning in language in order to convince people of a point. Such a technique is known as rhetoric, and it's been around roughly as long as language itself.

about 8 months ago
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Edward Snowden and the Death of Nuance

TheVelvetFlamebait Re:This just in... (388 comments)

I disagree. A large part of the debate is about Snowden's conduct; whether it's right to share state secrets, given what the NSA is doing. Note that this is an issue not entirely dependent on whether the NSA is justified in their actions or not.

about 8 months ago
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Edward Snowden and the Death of Nuance

TheVelvetFlamebait Re:Something else entirely? (388 comments)

Focus in the message that is by far the important thing.

The message is extremely important, yes, but so is his conduct. That's what half the debate is about. He may be the mailman, but if he's opening the mail and delivering it deliberately to the wrong hands, the message itself is not the only relevant factor.

about 8 months ago

Submissions

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Thinking about science causes moral behaviour

TheVelvetFlamebait TheVelvetFlamebait writes  |  about a year ago

TheVelvetFlamebait (986083) writes "Can thinking about science causes moral behaviour? According to the Scientific American website,

Researchers at the University of California Santa Barbara set out to test this possibility. They hypothesized that there is a deep-seated perception of science as a moral pursuit — its emphasis on truth-seeking, impartiality and rationality privileges collective well-being above all else. Their new study ... argues that the association between science and morality is so ingrained that merely thinking about it can trigger more moral behavior.

"
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Vista the new Win95?

TheVelvetFlamebait TheVelvetFlamebait writes  |  more than 7 years ago

TheVelvetFlamebait writes "Ed Bott from zdnet.com writes in his blog that Vista isn't the new Windows ME, rather the new Windows 95.

So does Windows Vista deserve the Me2 label? After a careful look back at my Windows history books, I see Vista heading down a different path. In fact, I'm struck by how similar Vista's path so far has been to the one that Windows 95 traveled.
He also goes on to make some small predictions based on his theory about Vista's future. What do you think? Does anyone else have any mid-to-long-term predictions for the latest Microsoft leviathan?"

Journals

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KVM, our discussion was archived

TheVelvetFlamebait TheVelvetFlamebait writes  |  more than 6 years ago

In case you were looking, KVM, I just wanted to say it was a pleasure discussing with you too. It's so rare to find someone so polite on slashdot. :)

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Imaginary Evils

TheVelvetFlamebait TheVelvetFlamebait writes  |  more than 6 years ago

I trust every person with an ounce of sanity is already arming up to defend our country against the blight that is known as Imaginary Property, but I'd like to call attention, for a moment, to a far greater corporate-based evil perpetrating society, brainwashing all the sheeple into believing its ingenious fallacies. I am referring, of course, to money stored digitally in a bank, or as I like to call it, "Imaginary Money"

I mean, it's not like they physically store your money anywhere, they just store some bits on the computer, and those bits could be easily copied for everyone's benefit. It's not any equivalent to real money, because unlike real money, it can be copied. And copying those bits is natural human behaviour. I'm not stealing anything (I SAID IT'S NOT STEALING!!!) because the person off whom I copied these bits isn't losing anything. It's a completely victimless crime.

In fact I would even go so far as to say that the mere fact that so called "bank fraud" is still illegal is IRREFUTABLE proof that the government is corrupt, that it always has been corrupt, and that it always will be corrupt, unless I go on a shooting spree with my AK-47, which I have a constitutional right, nay responsibility to own and use to blow the head off anyone I disagree with.

But first, I think I might stop by a few banks on the way...

(Copied off a post I wrote as AC. Copyright for it is completely revoked)

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The Pirate Bay Censored My Blog!

TheVelvetFlamebait TheVelvetFlamebait writes  |  more than 6 years ago

That's right, TPB censored my blog:

http://imustbeamafiaashill.baywords.com/2008/04/19/yay-free-speech/

It bashed the pirate bay for their abuse of the legal system, for their hypocritical money-grubbing from ad revenue, while they helped people break their local copyright laws, and their distortion of the copyright problem. I admit it was also a test of their much touted commitment to free speech, but I never really thought they would take it down, and so quickly! It came down overnight!

Boycott baywords and the pirate bay. The MAFIAA is more committed to free speech than them these days.

EDIT:

Whoops! It looks like it's back up! My bad! Still, it was a little suspicious that it came down, but the site itself didn't, and even when I entered in a phony blog name, it asked me whether I wanted to create one.

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SanityInAnarchy - when you're ready...

TheVelvetFlamebait TheVelvetFlamebait writes  |  more than 6 years ago

This is a post exclusively for SanityInAnarchy to reply to when his NDA allows him to.

So... what's this method for beating piracy with next to no DRM that makes bit-for-bit pirated versions inferior?

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