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Comments

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Amazon Bulk-Email Service Could Lure Spammers

TimFreeman Spammers cannot afford $0.10 per 1000 emails (71 comments)

The response rate for spam is very low (1 in 12.5 million according to http://www.techradar.com/news/computing/spammers-get-1-response-to-12-500-000-emails-483381?src=rss&attr=all), so a spammer would have to pay 12.5M / 1K * $0.10 = $1,250 to get a response by paying Amazon to send emails. Multiple responses will be required to make a sale. If they can't make $1,250 of profit per response, they can't make money by using Amazon to send their spam.

more than 3 years ago
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Goldman Sachs Says No Facebook Shares For US Investors

TimFreeman Re:Your fancy US Dollars (529 comments)

>... a "dollar" has no intrinsic worth, nor is it backed by anything of intrinsic worth.

My house mortgage is denominated in dollars. Dollars are backed by all the mortgaged real estate for which the mortgages are denominated in dollars.

more than 3 years ago
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Smartphone As Your Most Dangerous Possession

TimFreeman To avoid smudge, make the keys move randomly (154 comments)

If the keys moved around randomly on the screen at the beginning of typing the password and after typing each character, the positions of smudges on the screen would not give any information about the password. (Yes, this does have an obviously funny reply. Not sure how to upstage it from here. Go ahead and say it, then.)

more than 3 years ago
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Anonymous Now Attacking Corporate Fax Machines

TimFreeman Why attack Twitter? (410 comments)

Why attack twitter? http://www.twitter.com/wikileaks seems to be working fine, and the explanation at http://www.boingboing.net/2010/12/06/why-wont-wikileaks-t.html#comment-958285 for why Wikileaks didn't appear in trending topics makes sense to me. Everyone seems to agree that #cablegate did trend. The issue of why Twitter should be attacked is not mentioned at all in the original article.

more than 3 years ago
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Consumer Reports Gives AT&T Lowest US Carrier Rank

TimFreeman Article contradicts "dropped call rate of 0.1%". (187 comments)

The article said AT&T's "dropped call rate is within 1/10 of a percent – the equivalent of just one call in a thousand – of the industry leader". So if the industry leader drops 5% of the calls, AT&T drops 5.1%.

more than 3 years ago
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British Teen Jailed Over Encryption Password

TimFreeman When he gets out, can they ask for it again? (1155 comments)

So he's spending 16 weeks in jail. At the end of those 16 weeks, can they ask him for the password again and throw him in jail again if he does not divulge it?

more than 3 years ago
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LHC Shut Down Again — By Baguette-Dropping Bird

TimFreeman Re:Bug in CERN's temperature stats for the magnet? (478 comments)

Well, that's generally true, except the temperature of your bread will go negative if the tachyon flux is too high. I agree that having a toaster that risks vacuum collapse (no Higgs bosons required!) is unwise.

In other words, I have no idea WTF you mean and I think you're spewing word salad. :-)

more than 4 years ago
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LHC Shut Down Again — By Baguette-Dropping Bird

TimFreeman Bug in CERN's temperature stats for the magnet? (478 comments)

As I write this, the charts about their magnet temperature are contradictory. The top one says the temperature of the warmest arc magnet is back down to 2 Kelvins, but the lower right one says the temperature of the warmest arc magnet is about 9.5 Kelvins. It almost makes sense if we assume that the numbers at the lower right are the maximum value observed over the last few weeks, but the maximum in the upper chart is around 8 Kelvins and the lower right chart says 9.5 Kelvins, so it's still not right.

The URL from The Register is: ht tp://hcc.web.cern.ch/hcc/cryo_main/cryo_main.php?region=Sector81

(I have no clue what an arc magnet is.)

more than 4 years ago
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Hacking Nuclear Command and Control

TimFreeman Integral Fast Reactor (256 comments)

I was a big fan of the Integral Fast Reactor as a potential solution and in a way I still am. But the reality is 3rd and 4th generation reactors are a pipe dream because our material science is not advanced enough yet to produce a reactor design that will last the thousands of years it will take to use that fuel.

Please provide figures saying how long it would take to consume the existing supply of plutonium. The Wikipedia article about the IFR says 700 years for existing depleted uranium stores. Surely there's much more depleted uranium than plutonium?

Nuclear power is energy intensive *after* the energy has been produced simply because said technology (material sciences) are not adequate to produce a Nuclear reactor that has a life span that matches the geological time frames of the fuel.

The Wikipedia article says the waste would have to be stored ~400 years. You don't have to store the waste in the reactor, of course.

more than 5 years ago
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What the Papers Don't Say About Vaccines

TimFreeman Evidence that the dentists chelate? (737 comments)

...the dental industry doesn't want to even consider the possibility that the amalgam in your fillings might be bad for you (but nevertheless the dentist keeps taking his chelates for mercury)

I couldn't quickly find evidence for this via Google. Surely we have some real dentists around. Do you take chelation drugs to avoid harmful effects from the fillings you install?

more than 5 years ago

Submissions

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TimFreeman TimFreeman writes  |  more than 7 years ago

TimFreeman writes "Commercial airlines have machinery for controlling the pressure in the air cabin. I assume this machinery can give them any pressure they want, so they could have the pressure in the plane change smoothly from the ground-level air pressure at the takeoff point to the ground-level air pressure at the destination. Instead, the pressure goes down when they take off and back up when they land. When I flew with blocked eustacian tubes four days ago, it hurt like hell, every takeoff and landing, and my right ear still hasn't healed.

Why do they permit the pressure fluctuation?"

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