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Comments

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Tweeter To Be Prosecuted, Twitter Now Censoring?

Tisha_AH Dirty Little Secrets (195 comments)

Usually people who get their panties in such a knot over personal scandals being revealed to the general public have a few skeletons in the closet.

Who wants to put money on the thought that maybe Lord Neuberger has more than a few "kinks" of his own. I wonder if he likes to dress up like a schoolgirl and get his ass paddled by a dominatrix.

more than 2 years ago
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AF 447 Flight Recorder Found In the Atlantic

Tisha_AH Voice data for all flights by Satellite (218 comments)

There is more than one microphone on any voice recorder. There may be as many as five on some aircraft. Also, degrading the sound quality by lowering the data rate can mask other sounds that are even more critical than a flight crews last words.

more than 2 years ago
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MakerBot Introduces Printable Vinyl Records

Tisha_AH Bats love it! (89 comments)

I have been working with this technology for quite some time. Anything from Nirvana causes the bats to collide into a bloody mass over the cornfield.

about 3 years ago
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Regional Broadcast Using an Atmospheric Link Layer

Tisha_AH Divisible by the sum of the integer of the quotien (41 comments)

The math all works out. Excessive use of this technology will result in an implosion of our Sun in 1x10-12 years.

THIS IS A TECHNOLOGY THAT MUST BE STOPPED! THE THREAT IS IMMINENT!

about 3 years ago
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Plumber Injection Attack In Bowser's Castle

Tisha_AH Better than other forms of injection (59 comments)

They could have injected it into Bowser's shorts. He would be walking really funny.

about 3 years ago
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Oracle's Ellison Accused of Running Executive Fighting Ring

Tisha_AH Former Sun employees (56 comments)

They ran out of Sun employees who were used for bear baiting.

about 3 years ago
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LHC, CERN Has Found the Hugs Boson

Tisha_AH Deviant behavior in physics (86 comments)

It used to be that deviant behavior in physics involved "dirty dicking the 0-1 rod".

about 3 years ago
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Help Map Global Light Pollution, By Starlight

Tisha_AH Re:Light pollution != Energy waste (148 comments)

I am guilty of engineering a retrofit of lighting at a oil terminal to replace the long, yellow, low-pressure sodium lighting bulbs (400 watts) with 1500 watt HID lights.

The old light system was dim, with poor color rendition. The oil terminal could not do any work in the yard at night and it was difficult to detect a problem. (it was dark).

I went about in replacing all of the low pressure sodium lights with new 1500 watt, HID heads on the poles. Not being the one who was actually doing the wiring and never having gone back to that site at night, I did not know how bright it would be.

A year later I was flying into O'Hare airport (runway 14L) and looked out the passenger window. I saw this enormous white blur of lights about a mile away from the end of the runway. It was dazzling. Looking closer I recognized the layout of the oil terminal.

The installers put the fixtures on the poles but did not tilt them down enough. At least half the lighting was shining right into the eyes of the pilots on approach of 14L. I quickly asked our guys to tilt those damned lights down.

It was probably bright enough in the cockpit of the plane so they could have read a book while on approach.

about 3 years ago
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CS Prof Decries America's 'Internal Brain Drain'

Tisha_AH Re:DUH (791 comments)

I work in the electrical engineering field and have worked with a few other engineers who had been working as H1B workers.They did not have a particular talent or specialty that was lacking in any "domestic" engineer we had on staff. While I was friendly with the two engineers I knew of plenty of former classmates who were unemployed and equally (or more) qualified for the H1B position.

I never understood why the company I worked for went through such machinations to keep the two H1B engineers after they had laid off nearly twenty other engineers.

When employers are doing job reductions (layoffs) they should be required to re-justify why they laid off domestic workers vs. terminating H1B employees. This should be more than a single sentence about how this person has specialized skills that none of their American counterparts had.

about 3 years ago
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A Handy Radiation Dose Chart From XKCD

Tisha_AH External exposure vs. internal contamination (392 comments)

The greatest fear should be internal contamination. Many of the radioactive isotopes mimic their non-radioactive elements or have a similar biological uptake. (Strontium vs. Calcium), (normal Iodine 127 vs. radioactive Iodine 131).

For dosage calculations it is important to know if it is an alpha particle, beta particle, gamma ray or neutron. Each has different penetrating capabilities and different destructive potential.

If I had a choice between 1 Sievert of gamma radiation given externally or 10 milliSieverts of an internal dose of Iodine 131 (8 day half life) or Polonium 210 (138 day half-life) I would take the external dose.

Polonium is a wicked producer of alpha particles. When ingested or inhaled it is toxic in addition to giving you a constant source of radiation (rate decreasing by 1/2 every 138 days).

I had a thyroid disorder and I opted for the Iodine 131 treatment instead of surgery. It was an internal contaminant and my sweat and urine were radioactive and I emitted enough radiation that I was supposed to stay away from people for several days (there are biological half-lives for elements in the body that are quite different from isotope decay half-lives). The treatment essentially "killed" my thyroid on purpose since it was on it's own version of a nuclear meltdown.

Need to consider external vs. internal, particle types, radiological half-life and biological half-life on any sort of dosage calculation.

about 3 years ago
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Facebook Wedding Photos Result In Polygamy Arrest In Michigan

Tisha_AH Re:I don't get it (267 comments)

Yes, such a purely hypothetical society would be filled with whack-jobs. Men who are afraid of women, men who treat women like chattel. Even the religions would get very warped.

Good thing there is no such society on THIS planet.

about 3 years ago
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Apple: You Must Be 17+ To Use Opera

Tisha_AH Opera Does not kill applications (315 comments)

Opera does not kill applications, Apple kills applications

My take on "Guns don't kill people, people kill people"

more than 3 years ago
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Does Syfy Really Love Sci-Fi?

Tisha_AH Re:Advertising demographics trumps genre (742 comments)

Simply, SyFy is about as relevant to Science Fiction as the Home Shopping Network.

It just sucks ass. We used to watch 2-3 hours of Sci-Fi each night (Babylon 5, Farscape, Lexx, etc... ) now if I had a choice I would dump the channel completely.

Even the low rent UHF channels back in the mid 70's had more science fiction (The Spider, The Blob, Creature Features, etc...) What we have now is just embarrassing.

more than 3 years ago
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Sony Lawyers Expand Dragnet, Targeting Anybody Posting PS3 Hack

Tisha_AH Re:Cutting into Sales (437 comments)

I am amazed that Sony is persisting in being a BUNCH OF JACKASSES. When I purchased a PS3 several years ago most of the appeal was the "Other OS" feature. Sure, I have bought my share of games (>20) and enjoy those too. Selling something (Other OS) and then taking it away makes many of us just think that Sony management is full of Mother-Fuc&ers.

Sony should be embracing the Other OS crowd and giving us more options to use the platform for high end computing.

Hey assholes, you made the news as a forward thinking company when you gave us the Other OS feature. Now you are making the news for being just as backwards and ignorant as Micro$oft.

What the result will be (for me) is that I will enjoy the games I have but will not spend another dime on PS3 games. Guess what, I am doing that just to spite you.

more than 3 years ago
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Mozilla Proposes 'Do Not Track' HTTP Header

Tisha_AH Re:Great idea but not likely to happen (244 comments)

I see where Mozilla is coming from. They are looking at how many folks do not like being tracked and the popularity of programs like Adblock Plus, NoScript, etc...and are trying to add some of that functionality into the browser. Not a bad idea as there are significant numbers of folks who do not put any enhancements into their Firefox install other than some dumb toolbar. As Firefox will appeal to more and more non-technical types there would be some benefit to adding that functionality up front.

You can bet that the IE crowd will say that their browser works better and only compare the base load of Firefox.

The "do not track" header is a fine idea but it will only work for those sites that play by the rules.

Most don't.

Even with the additional "don't track header" capability I will not throw caution to the winds. I will continue to use Adblock Plus, NoScript and a few other tools.

more than 3 years ago
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The Prospects For Lunar Mining

Tisha_AH Re:Energy requirements? (348 comments)

It would be called lunathermal but yes, they think that the moon has at least a small molten core. The problem is that we are used to geothermal energy coming in some form of carrier (water) and in that regard the moon is a pretty dry place. There are more than enough thermal differences between sun/shade on the moon that you would not need to go to the complexity of drilling a borehole to get to a hot spot. Just put it in direct sunlight and there is a few hundred degrees of difference. A better bet might be to use a Carnot cycle engine (let's say with ammonia as a working fluid in a closed loop system, part in the shade, part in the sun). Or Peltier thermoelectric conversion (same hot/cold difference but with the direct conversion to DC electricity). For human habitation the best bet is underground (the deeper the better) to stabilize the temperature extremes, shield from radiation and as a fine building material. We have had a little bit of long term experience in operating machinery in a near vacuum (Mars) where odd things happen (solids that flow like fluids) and with bearing surfaces where conventional lubricants are fairly rare (other than the shuttle or the ISS). A solar furnace on the moon would develop a tremendous amount of heat for smelting operations. The moon appears to have abundant resources like aluminum in the regolith but it may be harder to find iron (meteorite mining). Going to the moon will need to yield "something" that is more difficult to get or manufacture than on the earth. Finding that technology and the market for the products will be a big challenge.

more than 3 years ago
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Are 10-11 Hour Programming Days Feasible?

Tisha_AH Work is killing me (997 comments)

I have worked for two companies that went down the same road. One started issuing all sorts of stock options, then they did a reverse 700:1 split and the new shares ended up going for about $3 each (originally they were as high as $38 a share before the split. At one time, during the.com boom it would have been around $2.24 million dollars in stock. After the reverse split the options were down to a total value of $257. They did re-issue new stock options at the revalued price, it was just an insult.

For seven years I worked the 50-60 hour weeks. Ended up with ulcers, heart problems, insomnia and some stress related disorders and on a laundry list of meds (I still take 12 prescriptions a day, eight years after I was finally laid off).

Seeing the doctor at the time I was taken aback when she said "just quit, no job is worth your life". It all made sense at the time, put in a few more years, exercise my options on a few million dollars and retire by age 40.

The second company just wanted more billable hours (consultant) as they could bill on the hours you put against a project. They just one day, unilaterally decided that our billable targets were set to 50 hours/week. Even working a 60 hour week you still lose hours when doing emails, phone calls, company motivational presentations and the obligatory after hour "social" get-togethers.

I tell ya, unless it is time with someone you really are in love with, after 50 hours a week the last thing you want to be doing is hanging out with the folks you work with.

Usually the folks who make these sorts of proclamations on "50 hour work weeks" have already been through a few divorces (because their job was way more of a priority than their families) and would not know what to do with their time if they were not at work. At this last company I was working a really long day, it was around 8 pm when I swung by the owners office to say good night to find him sitting there drinking Jack Daniels from a paper cup in his office. That is the type of life they wanted us to live. Only one priority in the world, work your ass off to make money for them. Not giving a damn about what your decisions mean to other people (probably why his wife dumped his ass too) and making all sorts of money so at your death you can have a viking funeral, burning on piles of $1 bills.

more than 3 years ago
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Smart Grid Brings Powerline Broadband Back?

Tisha_AH Re:200 Mbps (120 comments)

I have worked with EPB on some other comms projects. Their system is fiber to the home.

more than 3 years ago
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US Begins Sophisticated Wireless Jamming Project

Tisha_AH In an industry that already spends billions (157 comments)

Jamming has been going on since the second day after radio was developed. New technologies are developed to adapt to jamming conditions, then jammers get more complex to go after the new tech.

I learned many jamming techniques and countermeasures in a few graduate level courses on receiver design back in the mid 80's. What was being done was very complex, and we were only exposed to the "SENSITIVE NOFOR" security classification of what was going on. "Gating" a radar was developed back in WWII, frequency hopping around the same time, same with spread spectrum. When we were learning the tech the jamming systems could detect and jump on a new frequency in a few milliseconds. Nowadays I bet those response times are in the tens of microseconds and cover everything from "DC to daylight".

The US government would spend $8 million dollars to develop one model of a particular jammer and not blink twice at a $50,000/ unit purchase price. This would have been news if there were three more zeros after the price tag.

more than 3 years ago
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Scientists Propose One-Way Trips To Mars

Tisha_AH Re:Little difference? (839 comments)

I would rather take the folks on death row and vivisect them for spare parts. If a death row convict makes it to space it will be as a spare kidney.

more than 3 years ago

Submissions

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Prove you are smart... or Die!

Tisha_AH Tisha_AH writes  |  more than 3 years ago

Tisha_AH writes "Wired UK is running an article about vending machines installed by Britvic in the UK where free beverages are dispensed if you can pass a series of mental challenges. http://www.wired.co.uk/news/archive/2010-08/31/vending-machines-mental-agility

This is contrary to millions of years of evolutionary pressures where only the biggest and strongest had a spot at the watering hole. If this trend continues will we see well hydrated nerds clubbing their mates with the thighbones of our less intelligent brethren? Installing these machines at the offices of elected officials may result in "evolution in action" as the herd is thinned out by drought.

A clever designer would install a negative feedback loop where the beverage would contain a high percentage of alcohol (beer). Even the most clever IT professional would reach a limit after two or three visit to the ambrosia springs."

Link to Original Source
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Flight Data Recorders, decades out of date

Tisha_AH Tisha_AH writes  |  more than 3 years ago

Tisha_AH writes "For the past fifty years the technology behind aircraft flight data recorders has remained stagnant. Some of the advances of cloud computing, mesh radio networks, real-time position reporting and satellite communications are held back by a combination of aircraft manufacturers, pilots unions and the slow gears of government bureaucracy. Many recent aircraft loss incidents remain unexplained with black boxes lost on the bottom of the Atlantic Ocean, buried under the wreckage of the World Trade Centers or with critical information suppressed by government secrecy or aircraft manufacturers.

http://spectrum.ieee.org/aerospace/aviation/beyond-the-black-box/0

Many recorders still rely upon tape recorders for voice and data that only record a very small sampling of aircraft dynamics, flight and engine systems or crew behaviors. For many aircraft the recorders can only log a hour or two of data before overwriting the tape. All recording stops if the main electrical system fails and there is the ever present circuit breaker in the cockpit that can shut the system down.

Technologically simple solutions like battery backup, continual telemetry feeds by satellite and hundreds of I/O points, monitoring many systems should be within easy reach. An example of an extensive (but still primitive) recording system was during the loss of the NASA Columbia space shuttle. This vessel was equipped with a much larger assortment of monitoring points as it was used as a test-bed during shuttle development. Without the extensive forensic analysis of the telemetry data it would have been nearly impossible to reconstruct the accident in such detail. http://spaceflightnow.com/columbia/report/030826crew/

Pilots unions have objected to the collection and sharing of detailed accident data, citing privacy concerns of the flight crew. Accidents may be due to human errror, process problems or design flaws. Unless we can fully evaluate all factors involved in transportation accidents (aircraft, maritime, rail, transit) it will be difficult to improve the safety record. Recommendations by the NTSB to the FAA have gone unheeded for many years. http://www.policyarchive.org/handle/10207/bitstreams/3687.pdf

With all of the technological advancements that we work with in the IT field what sort of best practices could be brought forward in transit safety?"

Link to Original Source
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Fruit Picking Robotic Arm?

Tisha_AH Tisha_AH writes  |  more than 3 years ago

Tisha_AH writes "Wired has an unnerving video demonstration of a robot with a human-like hand that can modify it's means of grasping and picking up an object. It appears that the robot has a verbal interface and can be taught the differences between objects and the different amount of force to apply when grasping an object.

I hope that the robot can quickly learn the differences between a bowling ball and a baby's head before it is given free reign of our streets."

Link to Original Source
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Virgins in Space

Tisha_AH Tisha_AH writes  |  more than 3 years ago

Tisha_AH writes "The title seemingly describes most of the IT professionals but it has a more newsworthy meaning today. Virgin "Spaceship Enterprise" successfully completed its first crewed flight. Albeit this is not a sub-orbital jaunt but does take the private enterprise system one step closer to space tourism.

As it is a Virgin enterprise it is doubtful that any IT professionals will be joining the mile high club any time soon.

http://www.universetoday.com/2010/07/19/virgins-spaceship-enterprise-makes-first-crewed-flight/"

Link to Original Source
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Toyota wide open throttle accidents due to drivers

Tisha_AH Tisha_AH writes  |  more than 3 years ago

Tisha_AH writes "The Wall Street Journal reports that the NTSB has completed the investigation of several incidents where drivers of the Toyota Prius have complained that the vehicle would not stop. According to the event recorders in the vehicle the throttle was wide open and the brake was not being pressed.

Could it be that people just have really big feet or have forgotten what the right and left pedals are for?

http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052748703834604575364871534435744.html"

Link to Original Source
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Solar Sail Tested Successfully in Space

Tisha_AH Tisha_AH writes  |  more than 3 years ago

Tisha_AH writes "A common theme in science fiction has passed a practical test aboard the Ikaros spacecraft launched by the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency. A solar sail provided a minute but measurable level of thrust once unfurled from the spacecraft. This will set the foundation for future designs of space sails to be launched in the future by the Planetary Society.

We will soon see the day when spacecraft will get a helping hand from the gentle pressure of outflowing gas and particles from the sun. This has the potential to provide a significant amount of velocity for probes intended for the outer solar system.

The main article is at: http://www.space.com/businesstechnology/solar-sail-successfully-flies-on-sunlight-100712.html
A description of the solar sail experiment is at the Planetary Society web site: http://www.planetary.org/programs/projects/solar_sailing/20100625.html
The next solar sail project that will be launched by the Planetary Society can be found at: http://www.planetary.org/programs/projects/innovative_technologies/solar_sailing/"

Link to Original Source
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BP, How do you measure safety?

Tisha_AH Tisha_AH writes  |  more than 3 years ago

Tisha_AH writes "BP, the main company behind the oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico had created a safety program that placed the emphasis on personal safety and not on process safety. This failure to recognize that it takes more than safety shoes, hard-hats and eyeglasses to function in a manner that minimizes the inherent dangers of the petrochemical industry was thoroughly documented in a previous disaster at the Texas City refinery in 2005.

Read the final investigation report at; http://www.csb.gov/investigations/detail.aspx?SID=20&Type=2&pg=1&F_All=y (Page 19)

The company safety program placed the emphasis upon the employee and the minimization of lost-time injuries and drivers safety while at the same time, cutting spending on essential repairs to instrumentation and corroded equipment. From the executive levels of BP the company continued to cut spending on preventative maintenance to reduce the operating costs of it's refineries. Executive management would slash spending related to equipment repairs and maintenance to improve short term profitability to its US operations.

In many organizations safety is considered the responsibility of the work force and little emphasis is placed upon designing and maintaining for safe and reliable operations. In the calculus of money spent vs. lives lost or environmental catastrophes we should expect that more incidents like the gulf oil spill will happen in the future."

Link to Original Source
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Human Males Evolve at a Faster Pace Than Females

Tisha_AH Tisha_AH writes  |  more than 4 years ago

Tisha_AH writes "A report by the Whitehead Institute indicates that the human Y chromosome present in males is evolving at a furious pace. Across the chromosome there can be as much as a 33% difference within humans alone. The portions of the chromosome evolving fastest are related to sperm production"
Link to Original Source
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Lightning Stikes Delay Shuttle Launch

Tisha_AH Tisha_AH writes  |  more than 4 years ago

Tisha_AH writes "The Space Shuttle has had it's launch delayed due to need for inspection after several lightning strikes to the launch tower and/or shuttle. http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/shuttle/main/index.html Several different technologies have been applied by NASA to divert the strike energy to ground potentials with Air Terminals (lightning rods), surge protectors or the often disputed use of static dissipator brushes. http://www.google.com/patents/about?id=bK4gAAAAEBAJ One technology that appears promising is to cause a lightning strike (to a safe location) through the use of short pulsed ultraviolet lasers. http://www.iop.org/ej/article/1367-2630/4/1/361/nj2161.html Maybe in the future, once the technology matures we may find widespread use of UV lasers to protect space launch vehicles, antenna towers or buildings."

Journals

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BP safety program, a roadmap to disaster

Tisha_AH Tisha_AH writes  |  more than 3 years ago

BP, the main company behind the oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico had created a safety program that placed the emphasis on personal safety and not on process safety. This failure to recognize that it takes more than safety shoes, hard-hats and eyeglasses to function in a manner that minimizes the inherent dangers of the petrochemical industry was thoroughly documented in a previous disaster at the Texas City refinery in 2005.

Read the final investigation report at; http://www.csb.gov/investigations/detail.aspx?SID=20&Type=2&pg=1&F_All=y (Page 19)

The company safety program placed the emphasis upon the employee and the minimization of lost-time injuries and drivers safety while at the same time, cutting spending on essential repairs to instrumentation and corroded equipment. From the executive levels of BP the company continued to cut spending on preventative maintenance to reduce the operating costs of it's refineries. Executive management would slash spending related to equipment repairs and maintenance to improve short term profitability to its US operations.

In many organizations safety is considered the responsibility of the work force and little emphasis is placed upon designing and maintaining for safe and reliable operations. In the calculus of money spent vs. lives lost or environmental catastrophes we should expect that more incidents like the gulf oil spill will happen in the future.

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Drug Trials and Diseases that will kill or incapacitate you

Tisha_AH Tisha_AH writes  |  more than 3 years ago

This is something that I am passionate about. The "go it slow" approach to drug trials when millions of people are afflicted with a disease that will kill or cripple them.

My father had multiple sclerosis. Although he did not know it the military diagnosed the MS back in the late 50's and just referred to it as an unspecific condition. Later, in the early 70's he was involved in an accident at work (not caused by the MS or anything his fault) and the traumatic event caused the disease to become active again. It took a further five years for the doctors to identify that his ongoing medical problems were caused by MS and was verified when they finally got a hold of his military records that showed the diagnosis 20 years earlier.

As a teen and young adult I watched a healthy, active man gradually lose his ability to walk, participate in family activities and suffer terrible mental changes. I know that if he had been given any sort of opportunity for an experimental treatment, even if it had a chance of causing a premature death, he would have taken it. We, as his family would have stood behind him all the way.

The medical community wants to preserve this illusion of scientific principle by treating promising medical procedures as if they were in a laboratory setting. Double-blind testing, keeping folks in a study as you dispassionately watch them deteriorate and die and then compiling your report to show how 90% of the untreated folks died while only 85% of the treated folks died is a failure. I bet in that sample for those 5 out of 100 folks who "beat the odds" they did not consider the treatment a failure.

Medical advances are always made in small steps. 1-2% here or there off of the mortality of any condition and sooner or later you are talking about real lives.

There are many drugs that provided a positive benefit in treating an invariably fatal condition but had some much smaller incidence of causing a different type of fatal condition. To the folks who are facing a death sentence without treatment for something like MS, many would take what treatment they can get today.

This is not some acne medicine that may cause your liver to fail where the side effect is much worse than a bad looking school yearbook picture. Humans when put in extraordinary situations will to to extraordinary lengths to find a treatment. This is why folks to to Mexico or Thailand or the back-room doctor for an unapproved therapy. Do you really think they give a damn about the legality of it all?

Why in the hell do you need a control group for a study? You have 99.99% of the people who are not in the study as your control group. Doctors, hospitals, research centers, drug companies and regulatory agencies need to provide for whatever minimal beneficial effect to treating a condition once it is clear that the patient and patients family understands that there is no magic bullet for everything.

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Robert Byrd

Tisha_AH Tisha_AH writes  |  more than 3 years ago

It is hard to find a great deal of sympathy for Robert Byrd (senator). He was a KKK member and tried to fillibuster against civil rights. If it was up to him we would still be living in the days of segregation.

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