Beta
×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

Comments

top

Bill Gates: Piketty's Attack on Income Inequality Is Right

Tony Isaac What do we value? (832 comments)

Are 8 hours of work per day more valuable than 4? If so, shouldn't the person who works 8 hours a day have a higher income than the person who works 4, for the same type of work?

What about management? Which is harder for a landscaping business to find: a worker who can mow lawns, or someone who can successfully supervise them? Why wouldn't we reward the more difficult skill with more pay?

What about skill? Which is harder for a hospital to find: a doctor who can perform brain surgery, or a nurse's aide who can bandage wounds? Why wouldn't we pay the doctor more?

The idea that income inequality is bad, is often rooted in envy. There are reasons some people earn more than others, and that is the way it should be.

4 days ago
top

Bill Gates: Piketty's Attack on Income Inequality Is Right

Tony Isaac Re:Actually, it is harmful in a number of ways (832 comments)

The article points out correlations between low income and the many problems that come with it. But are the problems actually caused by low income, or could they (and low income) be symptoms of a different root cause?

4 days ago
top

Ask Slashdot: Handling Patented IP In a Job Interview?

Tony Isaac Patents vs. trade secrets (224 comments)

Since you didn't list your actual patent numbers, and you seem concerned about your employer using your patented IP, I have to assume that you see your patented inventions as trade secrets. In other words, you are worried that your employer might use your patented invention without your permission. If so, then you're doing it wrong.

The idea of a patent is to make the details of the invention totally public. In other words, a good patent application essentially gives any person "skilled in the art" the necessary information to recreate your invention. The IP itself is protected through licensing, and if someone violates the licensing terms, through litigation. Once the patent expires, it goes to the public domain, so that the entire world can benefit from recreating the invention.

If you want your invention kept secret, then for goodness' sake don't patent it! Keep it secret!

This is what many "inventors" don't understand. It's up to you to legally protect your patented invention. There is no patent police to enforce your patent protection for you, you have to go to court to enforce it. For us "little guys," a more effective tool is secrecy...use your ideas to create something useful, and don't disclose how you did it. If you can't make something useful with your invention, it probably isn't worth what you think it is.

Selling your invention to only one licensee (your employer) is not a money-making proposition. You need to sell your invention to many customers for it to come close to paying the costs of getting your patent through the USPTO. If you become an employee, and withhold your best work from them because you have a patent, the employer will see you as having divided loyalties. You will be LESS valuable to them, not more. So if you are patenting your ideas in order to look good to an employer, then list them on your resume and be done with it.

5 days ago
top

Why Do Contextual Ads Fail?

Tony Isaac Too much credit (249 comments)

This article gives advertisers way too much credit. When we hear "advertiser," we think of the big corporations with big ad budgets, who might actually care about relefant ads. Lots of Internet advertisers are just a guy with a computer, mucking around trying to make a quick buck. They put together bots that generate ads for every imaginable keyword, spraying them all over the Internet indiscriminately. The framework for placing ads in a relevant way might be there, but these guys work really hard to find loopholes, to game the system. Much of the time, they don't even care if you buy something, they just want clicks, because that's what they get paid for.

about two weeks ago
top

Is an Octopus Too Smart For Us To Eat?

Tony Isaac Intelligent because they can secrete ink? (481 comments)

I don't get it. How does that capability make them "smart"? Mosquitoes secrete a deadening agent into your skin to give them a few seconds to eat. Maybe we don't eat mosquitoes because of their intelligence.

Many creatures, such as fish, can camouflage themselves. But fish are really, really stupid.

Apparently the author hasn't heard of wild pigs, which don't require human intervention to live. They are pretty good at opening containers or other enclosures, when there is something they want inside.

about two weeks ago
top

Why Is It Taking So Long To Secure Internet Routing?

Tony Isaac White list? Really? (85 comments)

There are more than 600 million Web sites, according to NetCraft. Who is going to maintain a list like that? It's going to cost a lot of money...who is going to pay for it? Who is going to have the power to decide who gets in, and who doesn't? What about appeals, for those who feel they have been unjustly removed from the list? What about opposing points of view? Does the US get to decide which Chinese sites get to be on the list, or vice versa?

about a month ago
top

Dropbox Caught Between Warring Giants Amazon and Google

Tony Isaac It IS possible to compete against "free" (275 comments)

This article actually points it out: When the big players drop the prices to below cost, it is possible to still compete, by offering add-ons specific to certain types of customers, or better customer service, or in some other way differentiating yourselves from the big players. This applies both when the big guys are Amazon and Google, or when they are Walmart and Home Depot.

about 2 months ago
top

Smartphone Kill Switch, Consumer Boon Or Way For Government To Brick Your Phone?

Tony Isaac Why would they want to? (299 comments)

The government is much more interested in listening in, than stopping you from using your device.

about 2 months ago
top

New NSA-Funded Code Rolls All Programming Languages Into One

Tony Isaac Jack of all trades, master of none (306 comments)

This is the problem with languages that try to be everything...they aren't really good at anything.

about 2 months ago
top

Popular Android Apps Full of Bugs: Researchers Blame Recycling of Code

Tony Isaac All software is full of bugs (150 comments)

It doesn't matter if it is Windows, Mac, iOS, Android, or Linux, all software is full of bugs.

For that matter, all of everything constructed by human beings...is full of defects, or potential defects, or security vulnerabilities. Your house, for example. You have a lock on your front door, but it takes a thief just a few seconds to kick the door in. Or your car...a thief can break into it in seconds, even if you have electronic theft protection. I'd call those "security vulnerabilities."

It's the nature of all human creations, software or hardware, electronic or mechanical.

So what do we do? We improve security until it becomes "just secure enough" that we can live with the risks, and move on.

about 3 months ago
top

Favorite "Go!" Phrase?

Tony Isaac Re:Monopoly (701 comments)

ONLY when it's somebody ELSE!

about 2 months ago
top

Nest Announces New Smart Home API

Tony Isaac Just great... (38 comments)

Now hackers can focus on ONE API to place their pop-up ads inside your house, in your picture frame, on your refrigerator door. OR I can just see shady repair shops driving by your house with a device that disables your thermostat, then send someone to your door just in the nick of time, offering to fix it!

about 4 months ago
top

Teacher Tenure Laws Ruled Unconstitutional In California

Tony Isaac Re:You make it... (519 comments)

Job insecurity is a good thing. It has a way of motivating people to do what they have to do, to keep their job. Sure, some schools will have stupid expectations of teachers, and will fire them for the wrong reasons. But there are SOME schools with leadership that is insightful and wants the best for their children. These schools will try hard to keep good teachers, and let bad ones go. The old system tied the hands of administration at these schools, meaning they had to keep the bad teachers. Tenure rules made sure that ALL schools would have to keep bad teachers, even the ones that do have good leadership. The schools that have bad leadership...the children at those schools are screwed regardless of tenure.

about 4 months ago
top

'Pop-Up' Bus Service Learns Boston Riders' Rhythms, Creates Routes Accordingly

Tony Isaac Recursive algorithm (51 comments)

If these people have ever watched any TV, they will know that the ultimate algorithms are recursive algorithms. If they used those, they should be in good shape figuring out where people want to go!

about 4 months ago
top

Ask Slashdot: Tech Customers Forced Into Supporting Each Other?

Tony Isaac Try getting free technical support for your car! (253 comments)

Your check engine light comes on. See how much help you get calling GM! They'll tell you to take it to a dealer (which, by the way, is not part of GM).

Oh, so you got a "free" 10 year, 100,000 mile warranty? Oh yes, you paid for that, and it wasn't cheap. You just weren't allowed to opt out.

Why do we expect free technical support for computers?

about 5 months ago
top

On MetaFilter Being Penalized By Google

Tony Isaac Google is just giving people what they want (108 comments)

Personally, when I search Google for something, I get what I want on the first page of listings, Usually, what I want is the first or second item in the list. Google has gotten really, really good at figuring out what people want.

And it's not MetaFilter.

In this case, I think MetaFilter's problems are more related to their own inability to stay relevant, than anything Google did.

about 5 months ago
top

Agree or Disagree: We are in another tech bubble.

Tony Isaac Only a few big names (154 comments)

Yes, there are crazy amounts being paid for certain lucky tech companies. SnapChat turning down $3 billion, for example. Sorry, the company simply isn't worth more than half of the S&P 500. So in the sense that some social media-related companies are being bought by the giants for huge dollar amounts, there is a bubble.

But the bubble isn't extending to the bottom of the food chain. In the 90's, anybody who could say "Java" could get six figures, and any guy with a hair-brained idea and a few programmers, could get VC money from rich guys who did random things to choose where to sink their money. It's not like that now. These days, you have to actually be able to write software, to get a good job, and you have to have a viable business, to get VC dollars.

about 5 months ago
top

Fixing the Pain of Programming

Tony Isaac What pain? (294 comments)

I always thought programming was fun!

Maybe if it's painful to you, you should try a different line of work.

about 5 months ago
top

Understanding an AI's Timescale

Tony Isaac Computers already deal with slow humans (189 comments)

In terms of processor cycles, it takes a LONG time to type any kind of command for the computer to execute. It doesn't mind, it just spins happily, waiting for the end of our slow key presses.

Just as we can interpret input that comes in the form of visual cues, speech, or written words, any future AI is likely to have all of these capabilities as well. And that AI, being built by humans, is going to be well-adapted to human speed. Why would we make AI that was NOT suited to interaction with humans?

about 5 months ago
top

Understanding an AI's Timescale

Tony Isaac Re:Incorrect Timescale (189 comments)

Great point. Interestingly, speech recognition is also a massive undertaking for the human brain, we just don't notice, because our brains don't have just one processor, or even eight or sixteen cores, but millions of neurons processing audio data at the same time. It's going to take a while before inexpensive computers can match that kind of processing power.

about 5 months ago

Submissions

top

Newsweek will go all-digital in 2013

Tony Isaac Tony Isaac writes  |  about 2 years ago

Tony Isaac writes "Newsweek has announced that it will cease print publication at the end of the year, going all-digital. The new digital edition will still be based on a subscription model. Who will be next?"
Link to Original Source

Journals

Tony Isaac has no journal entries.

Slashdot Login

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?