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Who Is Liable When a Self-Driving Car Crashes?

Tourney3p0 Re:Efficiency. (937 comments)

I didn't read the GP has having anything *against* the child safety doors

An exception are back doors with stupid-child protection engaged

about 6 months ago
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Electrical Engineering Labor Pool Shrinking

Tourney3p0 Re:Return is not there for effort (401 comments)

"I'm a 5-digit UID member and have a lot of advice that should be taken seriously, but I'm going to go ahead and post as AC".

1 year,10 days
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Most IT Admins Have Considered Quitting Due To Stress

Tourney3p0 IT admins are special (397 comments)

Join the club. We meet at the bar after work.

about a year ago
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Mars Rover Curiosity: Less Brainpower Than Apple's iPhone 5

Tourney3p0 Re:Misleading (256 comments)

Dozens of little processing adds up to something more than a little processing. Point still stands. The comparison was done only to the central processor, which is misleading.

about a year and a half ago
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Mars Rover Curiosity: Less Brainpower Than Apple's iPhone 5

Tourney3p0 Re:Misleading (256 comments)

Close, but no. It means that it is designed to be swapped out quickly *at an operating location*. The moon is not an operating location, at least not yet.

about a year and a half ago
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Mars Rover Curiosity: Less Brainpower Than Apple's iPhone 5

Tourney3p0 Misleading (256 comments)

This is misleading. The rover has dozens of LRUs, all individually computing sensory input, crunching it, and sending it across the bus for the main computer to process. Yet it's only taking into account the main computer's processing power.

about a year and a half ago
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Can a New GPU Rejuvenate a 5 Year Old Gaming PC?

Tourney3p0 Re:No (264 comments)

Seeing as how he mentions the Geforce GTX 660 specifically, I don't think he's talking about a 10 year old AGP system.

about a year and a half ago
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Ask Slashdot: Current State of Linux Email Clients?

Tourney3p0 Good enough (464 comments)

I honestly have no complaints about the current state of email clients. Maybe I'm not using the current 0.09% of features, but I don't care about them. The current state is fine for me.

about a year and a half ago
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Apple Hides Samsung Apology So It Can't Be Seen Without Scrolling

Tourney3p0 Re:courts are stupid (743 comments)

Alternatively, "If you live in a country where the judge likes Apple, click here."

Not that your whole post comes off as incredibly biased or anything.

about a year and a half ago
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Apple Patents Alternative To NFC

Tourney3p0 Re:Pretty amazing (171 comments)

He said he looked down on people who supported dirty mega corporations. There's nothing bigoted about that, regardless of whether you agree with his standpoint or not. You're kind of an idiot, aren't you?

about 2 years ago
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CIA: Flying Skyhook Wasn't Just For James Bond, It Actually Rescued Agents

Tourney3p0 Re:Is this a surprise? (123 comments)

Yeah, no doubt they're getting up there in years. It's time I suppose.

It looks like they're going to be replaced by J-models, which I personally don't care for due to how the vendor has a lifetime contract for the main mission computer. That in itself isn't so bad, but we still have to have a full government team working concurrently to develop the plane-specific OFP. Nothing to do with the functionality, but it's pretty wasteful. Personal preference.

about 2 years ago
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CIA: Flying Skyhook Wasn't Just For James Bond, It Actually Rescued Agents

Tourney3p0 Re:Is this a surprise? (123 comments)

There's still an MC-130E at the entrance of Hurlburt (at the museum, so findable using GIS) still outfitted with the sky hook last time I was down there. I believe the later CT1s have all had the functionality removed, but I'm a CT2 (MC-130H) guy. Sadly, the E model is being phased out and even the development team has been shifted to other duties.

about 2 years ago
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Android Forums Hacked: 1 Million User Credentials Stolen

Tourney3p0 Re:lol linux (93 comments)

If you thought that was funny, you're going to *love* this new comedian Dane Cook that's making the rounds. Not sure what operating system he uses, though.

about 2 years ago
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Rare Operating Apple 1 Rakes In $374,500 At Sotheby's Auction

Tourney3p0 Re:Future Value? (118 comments)

There are other, rarer items from that era that consistently sell for much less. I won't speculate on the other possibilities, but technology enthusiast can safely be ruled out.

more than 2 years ago
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Iranian Military Says It's Copying US Drone

Tourney3p0 Probably not happening (350 comments)

I can see them building a physical replica, but there's just about no way at all that it would work the same.

Even if you completely ignore things like the remote data communication, reverse engineering the mission computer would take forever if it was possible at all. You've got dozens of LRUs (GPS, INS, analog to digital converters, MMR, etc). A lot if not most of this stuff isn't going to be functional on the ground.

Consider for a moment a Weight on Wheels switch. It's going to do a lot of important stuff. For instance, that's going to be one of the key functions that tells the radar not to power up and shoot a bunch of radiation directly into the technician's nutsack. The MC even on an old C-130 is a couple hundred thousand lines of code. The MIL-STD-1553B bus being used supports multiple channels with each channel supporting 32 LRUs (ignoring broadcast and the like, for simplicity). Each LRU will have 32 subaddresses, and each subaddress will consist of 32 16-bit words. We're looking at millions of bits potentially changing every single cycle. How long does it take to isolate which one corresponds to weight on wheels? How about the one that the MC sends to the radar to tell it not to power up while on the ground?

Or how about a different, more simple example. The unit will have a terrain following mode. If it's on the ground, that simply isn't going to work. There's no way you can simulate the conditions for the mission computer to receive an obstacle warning from the radar, then send out an override to the controls to modify course.

Millions and millions of bits changing every cycle. Even on ancient technology that runs at 20 Hz, you're looking at 20 cycles per second (which consists of one frame). Each bit within each cycle of each frame might correspond to a very different discrete signal.

It can be done, but it's not happening within a year. They're building a shell, but the important stuff is useless to them without much, much more time.

Source: I am a mission computer developer.

more than 2 years ago
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The Laws of Physics Trump Traffic Laws

Tourney3p0 Me Too! (378 comments)

Something similar happened to me my freshman year of college. I had an 8am EF exam the following day, so I was up late studying for it. Around 1am or so, my calculator batteries died. I was just about ready to go to bed after studying one or two more problems, so I was quite unhappy about having to go out to get new batteries.

Speed limit on the main street between myself and the nearest 24-hr convenience store half a mile away was 45 (I know, I should have walked. But all I wanted was to get it over with so I could sleep). I got pulled over for "drag racing" even though the streets were entirely empty other than myself and a cop waiting on a side road. To be fair, I was getting up to speed limit as quickly as possible so I could get it over with. But I was also "paced" at 60, which means he did not clock me but instead estimated my speed based on speeding up to catch up to me after turning off his side street. He included the streets where all this happened, so this gave me all the distances between incidences that I needed.

I used simple integrals to show the velocity/position relationship, along with the factory specifications of my car. End result is that the judge said he had no idea at all what I was talking about, and the ticket was dismissed because "it sounded right".

more than 2 years ago
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US Air Force Buys iPads To Replace Flight Bags

Tourney3p0 Re:Great way to take out US airlift capability. (348 comments)

Charting and mission planning are done way before the plane is in the air. It's typically loaded via a 3.5" floppy or PCMCIA card and can be manipulated through the VDTs if any sort of changes are necessary. If an EMP or similar managed to take out the mission computers (which shouldn't happen, since they are hardened), no way would they still attempt to complete the mission.

more than 2 years ago
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US Air Force Buys iPads To Replace Flight Bags

Tourney3p0 Re:E-paper (348 comments)

I've never even stopped to think about what it stands for, but it looks like Digital Map Interface System. It's basically a wrapper around Falcon View that does most of the stuff mentioned in the original post. In practice, it seems to just be used to manipulate flight plans on the fly rather than load a new one if it needs to be altered mid-mission.

more than 2 years ago

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