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Comments

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In UK, Internet Trolls Could Face Two Years In Jail

TubeSteak Re:Trolls are the lowest form of life. . . (457 comments)

Despite it's flaws, the near absolute interpretation of the constitutional right to the freedom of speech by the US Supreme Court is a godsend and makes me proud to be an American.

Your response demonstrates that you failed to read and understand my points. There will always be limits to freedom of speech, but those limits are much more restrained in the US than the UK, just to go down the list:

I'm not going to even bother than the rest, because you clearly missed the point. No right is absolute, but the US Supreme Court guards the freedom of expression in the US much more fiercely than European Courts do.

It sounds a lot like you're walking back from "near absolute"

And just for the sake of pedantry, it's worth mentioning that no one has a Constitutional right to free of speech.
Our right to free speech is natural and the Constitution limits how the Government can infringe on it.

/I'd also be interested in seeing your citations on the fighting words doctrine being overturned, the Supreme Court doesn't really agree with you.

yesterday
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If You're Connected, Apple Collects Your Data

TubeSteak Re:That's absurd, aim your hate cannon elsewhere. (301 comments)

Apple has an excellent track record on privacy issues. Not because they are super nice people, but because that's not their business model.

Or because Apple hasn't (acknowledged that they have) been hacked yet.

yesterday
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In UK, Internet Trolls Could Face Two Years In Jail

TubeSteak Re:Define trolling (457 comments)

Why exactly is that not already the case through existing law?

It is, they're just increasing the punishment.

yesterday
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In UK, Internet Trolls Could Face Two Years In Jail

TubeSteak Re:Trolls are the lowest form of life. . . (457 comments)

Despite it's flaws, the near absolute interpretation of the constitutional right to the freedom of speech by the US Supreme Court is a godsend and makes me proud to be an American.

I can't help but think that anyone who believes this is anything less that wildly ignorant about the Constitution and Supreme Court jurisprudence.

Here are some broad exceptions to the constitutional right to the freedom of speech:
1. Libel, slander, and various forms of misleading statements
2. Inciting others to violence
3. Fighting words
4. Disturbing the peace (offensive words can be considered a breach of the peace)
5. Intentional infliction of emotional distress
6. Copyrights & trademarks
7. Obscenity
8. Commercial speech

I may have forgotten one or three, but I think that suffices to make my point that there is nothing remotely like a "near absolute interpretation of the constitutional right to the freedom of speech."

Equally important to the point I'm trying to make is that at least 5/8 of those exceptions were well established as law when the Constitution was written.

yesterday
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Gigabit Cellular Networks Could Happen, With 24GHz Spectrum

TubeSteak It's finally happening (50 comments)

The FCCâ(TM)s notice talks about frequencies as high as 90GHz. Anything over 30GHz is classified as âoemillimeter wave frequencies,â which are blocked by walls. Indoor coverage is going to be tough.

âoe[W]hatever licensing regimes we adopt should take into account the fact that signals from carriersâ(TM) outdoor base stations will rarely be able to penetrate into the interiors of buildings, where around 75 percent of cellular data usage occurs today,â the FCC wrote. âoeReaching such spaces will almost certainly require the deployment of indoor base stations.â

The original concept for the cellular network was a series of big outdoor towers which talked to indoor base stations.
Of course, building owners didn't want the expense of (retro)fitting small indoor cells, which led to a lot more outdoor towers than envisioned.

yesterday
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Soda Pop Damages Your Cells' Telomeres

TubeSteak Re:Research Paper Link (398 comments)

I think it's interesting that 100% juice does not have the same effects.
Juice is increasingly being treated as junk food by dieticians and nutritionists because of its sugar content.
They don't even want juice to be treated as part of your recommended consumption of fruit.

yesterday
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iFixit Tears Apart Apple's Shiny New Retina iMac

TubeSteak Re:how do SSD's compare to HD's? (106 comments)

Anyone who actually needs a 5k display should already have a backup system in place.
It's only real purpose is so graphics designers can work on 4k media without dual screens and for industrial/medical fields where high res images are normal.

The truth is, if you want to watch 4k media, you're better off with a 4k display.
Upsampling &/or stretching to fill a 5k display is less than ideal.

2 days ago
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Robot SmackDowns Wants To Bring Robot Death Matches To an Arena Near You

TubeSteak Re:Piloted? (80 comments)

The closest thing to what you're describing was a 2013 SciFi series called http://www.syfy.com/robotcombatleague.

They were hydraulically powered humanoid robots that beat on each other until either one of them stopped functioning or it went to the judges' decision.

2 days ago
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Cisco Exec: Turnover In Engineering No Problem

TubeSteak Re:The essence of enterprise (143 comments)

We agree that in a environment where people do routine work, so many people share the required skill that identity of who provides this skill no longer matters. And that's where vast majority of the working population is employed.

You seem to completely ignore the value of institutional knowledge.

Maybe in your world, everything is documented, but everywhere else, knowledge of certain critical business processes is only retained in the memory of a few employees.

Slashdot even had a nice conversation about it a few years ago
http://tech.slashdot.org/story/11/12/04/1742211/institutional-memory-and-reverse-smuggling

2 days ago
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South Korean ID System To Be Rebuilt From Scratch After Massive Leaks

TubeSteak Re:20 million out of 50 million stolen? (59 comments)

The hardest part of getting a new SSN is gathering up originals/certified copies of the documents you need to support your application.
http://www.consumer.ftc.gov/articles/0248-do-you-need-new-social-security-number

Applying for a New Number or Replacement Card

The SSA may assign a new Social Security number to you if you are being harassed, abused, or are in grave danger when using the original number, or if you can prove that someone has stolen your number and is using it. You must provide evidence that the number is being misused, and that the misuse is causing you significant continuing harm.

Please don't spread misinformation.

3 days ago
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Chemists Grow Soil Fungus On Cheerios, Discover New Antifungal Compounds

TubeSteak What the f*ck? (77 comments)

Also, Cheerios overcame a common problem in growing fungi. Standard growth media varies in composition from batch to batch. These small variations can alter fungi growth, meaning researchers canâ(TM)t consistently produce the same set of metabolites with each experiment. However, one Cheerio is the same as another, box to box, batch to batch, today or years from now.

"Standard" media that isn't consistent sounds like a massive failure of quality control by the manufacturer.
Does no one make a quality growth media?

3 days ago
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The Guardian Reveals That Whisper App Tracks "Anonymous" Users

TubeSteak Re:If you want to be sure your words are not overh (180 comments)

We're supposed to be 'the land of the free and the home of the brave.' Free and brave people would not sacrifice fundamental liberties and allow worthless government thugs to search everyone at airports in the name of safety.

You might want to re-read the 4th Amendment and then pick up a history book.

The Founding Fathers have always considered border searches reasonable.
The first Congress passed a law about it in 1789.

To avoid summarizing 225 years of jurisprudence, I'll give the broad outlines of what isn't a reasonable border search.
1. Anything personally invasive or painful: strip searches, body cavity searches, x-rays, surgery
2. Destructive searches of property
3. Lengthy detention

And that's pretty much it.
You've never had an expectation of privacy at the border.

3 days ago
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Bill Gates: Piketty's Attack on Income Inequality Is Right

TubeSteak Re:Let me get this right (830 comments)

Everyone essentially pays no taxes on necessary food/housing/etc... So it's actually better for the poor than the middle and upper classes.

Better for the poor, better for the rich, worse for the middle class.
http://www.factcheck.org/2007/05/unspinning-the-fairtax/

Americans for Fair Taxation rejects the Treasury Department analysis, objecting that Treasury considers only the income tax. By leaving out payroll taxes (which are actually regressive) Treasury's chart makes the FairTax look worse by comparison. We found that including all the taxes that the FairTax would replace (income, payroll, corporate and estate taxes), those earning less than $24,156 per year would benefit. [David Burton, chief economist of the Americans for Fair Taxation] agreed that those earning more than $200,000 would see their share of the overall tax burden decrease, admitting that "probably those earning between $40[thousand] and $100,000" would see their percentage of the tax burden rise.

Show me an alternative tax structure that doesn't lower the tax burden for corporations or high earners by passing it onto the middle class and I'll support it.

4 days ago
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Worcester Mass. City Council Votes To Keep Comcast From Entering the Area

TubeSteak Re:It's not competition. (232 comments)

Defacto monopolies exist when only one company decides to compete.

You might want to re-read your Econ 101 textbook.

The most important aspects of a monopoly is its ability to raise market prices (abnormal profits) and/or exclude competitors.
Technically a company with 50% market share could do this, but for practical purposes, the threshold is considered 70%~80% of the market.

Markets with very few competitors (oligopolies and oligopsonies) can behave like cartels, without any formal collusion, giving everyone a chance to earn monopolistic profits.

Cable tv and utilities (power/water/gas/phones/sewage) are considered natural monopolies, but they weren't always.
If you dig around in US history, competition for utility infrastructure was tried and it failed miserably.

4 days ago
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Eggcyte is Making a Pocket-Sized Personal Web Server (Video)

TubeSteak Encryption? (94 comments)

The Kickstarter page makes no mention of encryption between my device and the Egg.
Nor anything about encrypted storage on the device itself.

If your selling point is personal security, you should really be mentioning how your device is meaningfully secure.

5 days ago
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Pentagon Reportedly Hushed Up Chemical Weapons Finds In Iraq

TubeSteak Re:Designed in US, Built in EU, Filled in Iraq (376 comments)

It's not clear if the contents of those weapons is still usable or whether ISIS has the technology to deploy them.

From the NY Times

All had been manufactured before 1991, participants said. Filthy, rusty or corroded, a large fraction of them could not be readily identified as chemical weapons at all. Some were empty, though many of them still contained potent mustard agent or residual sarin. Most could not have been used as designed, and when they ruptured dispersed the chemical agents over a limited area, according to those who collected the majority of them.

They're still effective as IEDs and those require no special technology to set up and detonate.

5 days ago
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Technology Heats Up the Adultery Arms Race

TubeSteak Re:Already gone (304 comments)

In modern divorce law it doesn't matter. It gets split 50/50 unless there's a prenup.

This is almost entirely wrong.

There are two different philosophies you'll run into, depending on which State you're in.
1. Equitable distribution - 40 States + Alaska + DC
2. Community property - 9 States + Alaska + Puerto Rico

Community property states presume a 50/50 ownership interest in marital assets (a lot of money gets spent on defining what is and isn't a marital asset), but judges can still base their distribution on what is fair (aka equitable).

/Alaska's default is equitable distribution, but couples can sign a community property contract
//I'm not a lawyer

5 days ago
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Millions of Voiceprints Quietly Being Harvested

TubeSteak Over the phone? (86 comments)

The Vanguard Group Inc, a Pennsylvania-based mutual fund manager, is among the technologyâ(TM)s many financial users. Tens of thousands of customers log in to their accounts by speaking the phrase: âoeAt Vanguard, my voice is my passwordâ into the phone.

The problem with biometrics is that you can't ever replace them if they are stolen.

So naturally they want to use a password that you have to announce publicly. :facepalm:

5 days ago
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Can the Sun Realistically Power Datacenters?

TubeSteak Solyndra (236 comments)

The second link brings up Solyndra and government loan guarantees.
The author conveniently leaves out the fact that Solyndra's failure was a direct result of China dumping solar panels onto the market.

The USA and China have been fighting a slow motion battle at the World Trade Organization over solar subsidies and tariffs.

In 2012, the USA slapped billions in tariffs on Chinese products.
In 2014, the WTO said that the USA overstepped with its tariffs.
Then the Chinese appealed the WTO ruling even though it was in their favor.

Solyndra's failure and the ensuing finger pointing led to $14+ billion in tariffs, over 2 years, on Chinese products.
All because of a $535 million federal loan that didn't pay off.

about a week ago
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Netflix Video Speed On FiOS Doubles After Netflix-Verizon Deal

TubeSteak Re:Isn't this what Netflix OpenConnect is for? (204 comments)

Verizon has a competing (to some extent, anyway) video service.

Verizon owned a majority stake in Redbox's online streaming, which just shut down.
Verizon also announced plans to launch a new online video platform sometime next year.

about a week ago

Submissions

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Update: Comcast Doesn't Block Web Browsing

TubeSteak TubeSteak writes  |  more than 6 years ago

TubeSteak (669689) writes "It turns out the results from the previous /. story Comcast Blocks Web Browsing were the result of the researcher's NAT hardware being overloaded.

A note regarding our findings: Further experiments have led us to believe that our initial conclusions that indicated Comcast's responsibility for dropping TCP SYN packets and forging TCP SYN, ACK and RST (reset) packets was incorrect. Our experiments were conducted from behind a network address translator (NAT). The anomalous packets were generated when the outbound TCP SYN packets exceeded the NAT's resources available in it's state table. In this case, TCP SYN, ACK and RST packets were sent. We would like to thank Don Bowman, Robb Topolski, Neal Krawetz, and Comcast engineers for bringing this to our attention. We sincerely apologize for any inconvenience that this posting may have caused.
Oops."

Journals

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TubeSteak TubeSteak writes  |  about 8 months ago

MOVIN' ON UP. You are on Slashdot Classic. We are starting to move into new digs in February by automatically redirecting greater numbers of you. The new site is a work in progress so Classic Slashdot will be available from the footer for several more months. As we migrate our audience, we want to hear from you to make sure that the redesigned page has all the features you expect. Find out more.

No thanks. And since when did the journal lose its classic /. layout?

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TubeSteak TubeSteak writes  |  more than 4 years ago

The Economist Weighs In For Shorter Copyright Terms
I suggest we drop by the house of everyone that doesn't understand IF YOU DONT LIKE IT DON'T WATCH/READ/LISTEN TO IT, and slap them in the side of the head.
-This is the best presentation of an argument I've heard in weeks. I can't imagine why you've never run for public office.
--It would be far too exhausting. Can you imagine how many voters would need their heads slapped during the campaign?

Wanted: Campaign volunteers
Requirements: At least one hand and a desire to change the country

Campaign slogans:
"Hit the IP industry where it hurts: Upside their heads."
"How can she slap? She slaps for copyright reform."
"Communicate with today's voters the way their parents once did: with a slap."
"Would you rather have 14 slaps or 95 slaps? We feel the same way about the length of copyright."
"How many slaps does it take to get to the center of a Tootsie Pop?"

-This message sponsored by Students Litigating Against Pratty Publishers

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TubeSteak TubeSteak writes  |  more than 8 years ago

I'm going to quote an old post from the "DMCA Abuse Widespread" article:

Whenever a controversial law is proposed, and its supporters, when confronted with an egregious abuse it would permit, use a phrase along the lines of 'Perhaps in theory, but the law would never be applied in that way' - they're lying . They intend to use the law that way as early and as often as possible.

I'm sticking this here so that next time i want to quote these words, I won't have to go looking.

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MoG Trolls

TubeSteak TubeSteak writes  |  more than 9 years ago Every now and then, something comes along and makes you laugh till your sides hurt. The following is one such "thing".

MoG Trolls

I tried to flush one down the toilet. It didn't work. It's still there. Then I had one wet gibbering MoGTroll, 1 acid-stained MoGTroll, and 248 dry MoGTrolls, and one blocked toilet. The MoGTroll won't come out of the toilet. I don't mean its stuck in it - it REFUSES to come out

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TubeSteak TubeSteak writes  |  more than 10 years ago

Evil Overlord

If I ever become an Evil Overlord:

1. My legions of terror will have helmets with clear
plexiglass visors, not face-concealing ones.

2. My ventilation ducts will be too small to crawl through.

3. My noble half-brother whose throne I usurped will
be killed, not kept anonymously imprisoned in a forgotten
cell of my dungeon.

4. Shooting is not too good for my enemies.

5. The artifact which is the source of my power will
not be kept on the Mountain of Despair beyond the River
of Fire guarded by the Dragons of Eternity. It will
be in my safe-deposit box.

6. I will not gloat over my enemies' predicament before
killing them.

7. When the rebel leader challenges me to fight one-
on-one and asks, "Or are you afraid without your armies
to back you up?" My reply will be, "No, just sensible."

8. When I've captured my adversary and he says, "Look,
before you kill me, will you at least tell me what this
is all about?" I'll say, "Nope" and shoot him.

9. After I kidnap the beautiful princess, we will be
married immediately in a quiet civil ceremony, not a
lavish spectacle in three weeks time during which the
final phase of my plan will be carried out.

10. I will not include a self-destruct mechanism unless
absolutely necessary. If it is necessary, it will not
be a large red button labeled "Danger: Do Not Push".

11. I will not order my trusted lieutenant to kill the
infant who is destined to overthrow me -- I'll do it
myself.

12. I will not interrogate my enemies in the inner sanctum
-- a small hotel well outside my borders will work just
as well.

13. I will be secure in my superiority. Therefore,
I will feel no need to prove it by leaving clues in
the form of riddles or leaving my weaker enemies alive
to show they pose no threat.

14. I will not waste time making my enemy's death look
like an accident: I'm not accountable to anyone and
my other enemies wouldn't believe it.

15. I will make it clear that I _do_ know the meaning
of the word "mercy"; I simply choose not show them any.

16. One of my advisors will be an average five-year-
old child. Any flaws in my plan that he is able to
spot will be corrected before its implementation.

17. All slain enemies will be cremated, not left for
dead at the bottom of the cliff. The announcement of
their deaths, as well as any accompanying celebration,
will be deferred until after the aforementioned disposal.

18. My undercover agents will not have tattoos identifying
them as members of my organization, nor will they be
required to wear military boots or adhere to any other
dress codes.

19. The hero is not entitled to a last kiss, a last
cigarette, or any other form of last request.

20. I will never employ any device with a digital countdown.
If I find that such a device is absolutely unavoidable,
I will set it to activate when the counter reaches 117
and the hero is just putting his plan into operation.

21. I will design all doomsday machines myself. If
I must hire a mad scientist to assist me, I will make
sure that he is sufficiently twisted to never regret
his evil ways and seek to undo the damage he's caused.

22. I will never utter the sentence "But before I kill
you, there's just one thing I want to know."

23. When I employ people as advisors, I will occasionally
listen to their advice.

I for one welcome our new *_____* Evil Overlords

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TubeSteak TubeSteak writes  |  more than 11 years ago I like "In Soviet Russia" jokes. I think it's a shame that they've faded away... kinda like the Cowboy Neal option on polls.

Q: How can you tell an extroverted computer geek from an introverted computer geek?
A: The introverted computer geek will look at his shoes while he talks to you. The extroverted computer geek will look at your shoes while he talks to you.

Q: How do you tell if an Extroverted computer geek is Russian?
A: His shoes look at you while he is talking.

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