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The First Fully 3D-Printed Gun Has Been Successfully Test-Fired

Twisted64 Re:That's nice (717 comments)

That Murder by Numbers article is trying pretty hard with the "Murders per 100,000 people" graph. It also doesn't support your comment about the UK, Australia and much of Europe in ANY way whatsoever.

I'm wasting my time, but can't help pointing out that it isn't really helpful removing blacks from the equation - they might be responsible for half the crime, but the country as a whole is responsible for its citizens, and blacks aren't exactly the most recent immigrants.

about a year and a half ago
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New Microsoft App To Coordinate Disaster-Relief Efforts

Twisted64 First attempt with big company support behind it? (69 comments)

After a series of small disasters in Australia and New Zealand, my previous employer tried to kick off a website to pair helpers with those requiring assistance. Several others popped up at the same time. There's nothing especially new about the idea; we were working on an android app at the same time. However, it would need a bit of policing to make sure idiots don't just sign up for free stuff.

about 2 years ago
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Ask Slashdot: What Books Have Had a Significant Impact On Your Life?

Twisted64 Re:Some... (700 comments)

Milligan! I love you. The entire war series is excellent, save for a bit where he suffered shellshock and the humour disappeared.

more than 2 years ago
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How Cosmological Supercomputers Evolve the Universe All Over Again

Twisted64 A minor quibble (144 comments)

It's 'sheer' cost. Wouldn't have brought it up, but you raised the bar with the rest of your post.

more than 2 years ago
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Innocence of Muslims Filmmaker Arrested, Jailed

Twisted64 Re:it didn't (747 comments)

It sparked a protest/minor riot in Sydney, Australia. Almost nothing does that, and the ridiculous slogans the protesters were carrying were actually one of the scariest things I've seen in this country. Melbourne managed to show more tolerance.

Going offtopic slightly, I can't wait to see a video of Mohammed dancing to "Gangnam Style," as it must be under development somewhere by now.

more than 2 years ago
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Beer Is Cheaper In the US Than Anywhere Else In the World

Twisted64 For the love of Christ (633 comments)

READ the submission before posting. If it doesn't make sense, add/remove/modify words until it does, ok?

The first sentence probably needs to start with the word "While."

India tops the LIST.

about 2 years ago
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How Indie Devs Made an 1,800-Player Action Game Mod In Their Spare Time

Twisted64 Re:MMO Joust (87 comments)

MMO ET: Everyone gets thrown into a pit, and you need to jump on top of other people's heads to jump out of the pit.

I take it you haven't tried Transformice? I like a description I read which claimed the enemy was "the human condition." Very true.

more than 2 years ago
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Nokia Apologizes For Misleading Lumia 920 Ad

Twisted64 Re:surprise... (233 comments)

The iPad2 TV advertisement (in Australia) that ran with claims such as "it's crazy powerful" and "it's magical" delivered in the kind of voice I wanted to stab in the foot.

YES it's good advertising, but NO some of those things they're saying aren't really true. And it hurts me somewhere inside to think of the manipulation going on right in front of my eyes

.

more than 2 years ago
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Did Sweden Pay Cambodia For the Pirate Bay Co-founder?

Twisted64 Re:Betteridge's law of headlines (250 comments)

I am so sick of seeing this. It's the latest "correlation is not causation" (previously godwin's law) that somebody now feels the need to put into every god damn article with a question for a headline.

Nothing against the parent personally, and nothing will stop it from appearing again, just wanted to vent.

more than 2 years ago
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Book Review: Think Like a Programmer

Twisted64 SpaceChem (98 comments)

How to see if you think like a programmer.

Step 1. Play SpaceChem.
Step 2. Check levels of enjoyment. If you are enjoying yourself, get thee to a programming job. Preferably in the field of robotics, I guess.

Alternatives to starting your programming career would include playing Zachtronics' other games, especially the codex of engineering. They have a perfect learning curve. I know I've posted about this a couple of times, but it can't be overstated; these games are all about programming.

more than 2 years ago
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Ask Slashdot: Most Underappreciated Sci-Fi Writer?

Twisted64 HARRY HARRISON FOR LIFE YO (1130 comments)

His earlier stuff is average pulp scifi, but he improved so much. I love Harry Harrison with every part of my body. I held hope that Deathworld might be made into a movie... but Avatar has kind of kicked that idea in the guts, it would be seen as derivative now.

more than 2 years ago
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Should Journalists Embrace Jargon?

Twisted64 Perhaps it's just the summary, but... (184 comments)

What? What is the problem? Is antipathy regarding jargon an issue for journalists?

If a language requires a large degree of labour to understand, there's no point using it in an article intended for the general public. Oooooh, this isn't about journalists (as I understood it from the title), it's about researchers acting like journalists.

My fear is that the percentage of people who use language correctly seems to be diminishing. I reassure myself with the thought that I can't pinpoint when this started happening. Our caveman ancestors would no doubt have torn The Reader Over Your Shoulder to shreds, metaphorically.

more than 2 years ago
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Why Ultra-Efficient 4,000 mph Vacuum-Tube Trains Aren't Being Built

Twisted64 Why not... (625 comments)

Why not install big fans at the front of the train that suck in practically ALL the air in front of the train before it hits, compress it into narrow pipes that run the length of the train and then exhaust at the rear? You'd still run it in a tube, but the train itself would effectively feel like it was passing through a vacuum.

Perhaps the simple answer is that it would cost too much, but I'd like to hear it, because this has actually been playing on my mind a bit lately.

more than 2 years ago
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Math Textbooks a Textbook Example of Bad Textbooks

Twisted64 Re:It's not just the textbooks (446 comments)

I'm not sure if the US has seen the same behaviour as Australia, but 30 years ago 1st graders were probably 2 years younger than they are now. Parents just don't seem keen to get their children through the education system, and as a result they're starting their actual education much later than previous generations.

more than 2 years ago
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Commercial, USB-Powered DNA Sequencer Coming This Year

Twisted64 Re:Yes, goodie (95 comments)

Ah, that's just over 30:1, not 300:1.

more than 2 years ago
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Australian R18+ Rating For Games? Not Yet; NSW Refuses To Vote

Twisted64 Re:What's that supposed to mean? (71 comments)

Well we have a grand total of six states and a couple of territories worth mentioning, so that attorney-general will 'represent' a hefty chunk of the population.

more than 3 years ago
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Why People Who Make Things Should Learn Chinese

Twisted64 I love you (588 comments)

Yes, yes, a million times yes.

more than 3 years ago

Submissions

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Panic as Australian telco passes browsing data to the US

Twisted64 Twisted64 writes  |  about 2 years ago

Twisted64 writes "Australia's largest telco, Telstra, has been frightening users of its mobile data services for the last week. Logging revealed that HTTP requests from a mobile device on Telstra's network were duplicated with a request from another server, located in Chicago.

Eyebrows were raised on the Whirlpool forums, with fears that Telstra was giving up Australian browsing data to a US company and therefore the US government. Following a well-worded letter Telstra revealed today that the reason for this behaviour is that the company is preparing an opt-in web filter.

Personally, while the idea of my browsing data being logged anywhere does not fill me with joy, the idea of the US government having access to it (randomised or not) is probably going to make me switch to an inferior carrier once my current plan ends."

Link to Original Source
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Australian telco causes minor panic while preparing web filter

Twisted64 Twisted64 writes  |  about 2 years ago

Twisted64 writes "Australia's largest telco, Telstra, has been frightening users of its mobile data services for the last week. Logging revealed that HTTP requests from a mobile device on Telstra's network were duplicated with a request from another server, located in Chicago.

Eyebrows were raised on the Whirlpool forums, with fears that Telstra was giving up Australian browsing data to a US company and therefore the US government. Following a well-worded letter Telstra revealed today that the reason for this behaviour is that the company is preparing an opt-in web filter.

Personally, while the idea of my browsing data being logged anywhere does not fill me with joy, the idea of the US government having access to it (randomised or not) is probably going to be enough to make me switch to an inferior carrier once my current plan ends."

Link to Original Source
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Efficiently matching users on a social website?

Twisted64 Twisted64 writes  |  more than 3 years ago

Twisted64 writes "After the Australian floods, a few sites have popped up, attempting to get flood victims in touch with their would-be saviours in the shortest time possible.These include qldfloods.org, floodaid.com.au, wikifloods.com.au, ozfloodhelp.org and mydisasterbuddy.com.

The sites use different methods to get people to register their needs or areas where they can provide assistance. Floodaid is a basic list for people to search through, wikifloods provides a bulletin board, and My Disaster Buddy is a basic networking site, allowing a basic search and requiring registration to get in contact (but after registration it automates the searching process, matching users based on their preferences).

What do you think is the best approach to getting people in contact with each other, with the minimum of fuss? It's clearly too late after the fact to throw together a website and expect it to be a polished production, but there is clearly a need that is being answered in several differing ways. Disasters will continue to happen, and plenty of people with a mobile phone have enough internet access to make these projects worthwhile."
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Creating an efficient social site?

Twisted64 Twisted64 writes  |  more than 3 years ago

Twisted64 (837490) writes "After the Australian floods, a few sites have popped up, attempting to get flood victims in touch with their would-be saviours in the shortest time possible.These include qldfloods.org, floodaid.com.au, wikifloods.com.au, ozfloodhelp.org and mydisasterbuddy.com.

The sites use different methods to get people to register their needs or areas where they can provide assistance. Floodaid is a basic list for people to search through, wikifloods provides a bulletin board, and My Disaster Buddy is a basic networking site, requiring registration (but after registration it automates the searching process, matching users based on their preferences).

What do you think is the best approach to getting people in contact with each other, with the minimum of fuss? It's clearly too late after the fact to throw together a website and expect it to be a polished production, but there is clearly a need that is being answered in several differing ways. Disasters will continue to happen, and plenty of people with a mobile phone have enough internet access to make these projects worthwhile."

Link to Original Source
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"Friendly Networking" site for disaster victims

Twisted64 Twisted64 writes  |  more than 3 years ago

Twisted64 (837490) writes "Due to the ongoing saga of Australia's amazing floods, several pages have sprung up on facebook and other social networking sites to help volunteers assisting in flood cleanup. However, there are thousands of people more willing to lend a hand than donate money, and figuring out where to send them is a massive effort in coordination.

One new community-driven website, My Disaster Buddy, has done away with the donation element entirely with the aim of bringing the needy and the helpful together. Although it is still very basic, the intention is clear. The site allows users to check off their areas of possible assistance and then matches them with a user affected by the disaster. They can then interact on a one-to-one basis.

It figures that this more altruistic type of networking site would emerge in Australia, where the people are known for being both helpful and early adopters of technology, borne out by the torrent of youtube videos of cars being washed away and stories of men wading through chest deep water to rescue wallabies.

Obviously this kind of connectivity will only be effective in areas where most people have access to the internet, but can such a solution work?"

Link to Original Source
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A p2p solution for disaster recovery

Twisted64 Twisted64 writes  |  more than 3 years ago

Twisted64 (837490) writes "Due to the ongoing saga of Australia's amazing floods, several pages have sprung up on facebook and other social networking sites to help volunteers assisting in flood cleanup. However, there are thousands of people more willing to lend a hand than donate money, and figuring out where to send them is a massive effort in coordination.

One website has done away with the donation element entirely with the aim of bringing the needy and the helpful together. The site allows users to check off their areas of possible assistance and then matches them with a user affected by the disaster. They can then interact on a more personal one-to-one basis. While it may not make much sense for the initial cleanup job, this approach may have some long-term benefits after the media attention dies down.

It figures that this altruistic type of "helpful networking" site would emerge in Australia, where the people are known for being both helpful and early adopters of technology, views borne out by the torrent of youtube videos of cars being washed away and stories of men wading through chest deep water to rescue wallabies.

The site does seem a touch slow, so here's the Coral Cache link."

Link to Original Source
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"howto" website created for Australian voters

Twisted64 Twisted64 writes  |  more than 4 years ago

Twisted64 (837490) writes "If you're interested in voting below the line in the upcoming federal election in Australia, but don't want to waste time in the booth individually ranking up to 76 candidates (for the unfortunates in New South Wales), then Cameron McCormack's website may have what you need. The website allows voters to set their preferences beforehand, dragging and dropping Stephen Conroy at the bottom of the barrel and thrusting the Sex Party into pole position (as an utterly random example). Once preferences are set, the site can generate a pdf to be printed and taken to the booth.

There's also something to educate the above-the-line voters — if you check the box for your single party of choice, the site will fill out the effective party preferences below the line. This shows that a vote for The Climate Sceptics hands first preferences to Family First, and so on.

The website claims not to harvest voting information, but for the paranoid it recommends printing out a blank ballot sheet and copying your preferences from the screen. There is also a button to set up a donkey vote when in the ballot view, in case you have trouble counting from 1 to 100."

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