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How the Ancient Egyptians (Should Have) Built the Pyramids

Tyler Durden Re:Hillerious (201 comments)

They built a pyramid, we havn't.

How can we tell them how to build it better, when we cant even achieve what they did 4000+ years ago? lol

But my point is it may be the only thing preventing us from achieving the same is an unwillingness to be blatantly immoral (not to mention finding a compelling reason to build one in the first place). If that's the case then, yeah, we might very well have grounds for telling the a better way to do the same thing. You never know. *shrug*

2 days ago
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How the Ancient Egyptians (Should Have) Built the Pyramids

Tyler Durden Re:Hillerious (201 comments)

A big reason we don't build something similar of that scale now is that we tend to frown upon obvious slave labor nowadays.

No need to tell Noah anything. The flood story is a myth.

2 days ago
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Ancient Skulls Show Civilization Rose As Testosterone Fell

Tyler Durden Re:Makes sense (387 comments)

Testosterone does not cause assholish-ness, per se, so much as it exacerbates it.

Oh, so kind of like alcohol then.

about three weeks ago
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More Quantum Strangeness: Particles Separated From Their Properties

Tyler Durden Re:Limits of Measurement (144 comments)

Electrons interfere with themselves, because the fluctuation (which is the electron) exists in the full region between the source and screen. The interference pattern is the same no matter how slowly (in terms of electron rate) you fire the electrons, so build up is not a concern.

And this is an important point. I'm not a physicist, but one thing that helped me understand this better is to consider firing a single electron (for example) at the two slits one at the time. It could be at the rate of one per minute, one hour or whatever.

Every electron that makes it through to the screen behind the two slits will hit it at a single point. Nothing unusual there. However, if you make a histogram on the screen based on how frequently each spot gets hit by an electron you'll see the interference pattern you'd expect from a wave being split in two from the two slits. So each electron is a wave that travels through both slits, not one or the other.

about a month ago
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People Who Claim To Worry About Climate Change Don't Cut Energy Use

Tyler Durden Re:No real surprise (710 comments)

If there is true consensus about global warming, then science should be inviting opposing thought - not trying to stifle the discussion like a dictator.

But what if the opposing "thought" you're inviting is simply a bunch of specious reasoning debunked a long time ago? Repeated over and over. To the point that you realize that the ones doing the arguing have no interest whatsoever in any kind of objective truth. How long should you be inviting it then? How long do you pretend they deserve respect?

about a month and a half ago
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Mathematicians Solve the Topological Mystery Behind the "Brazuca" Soccer Ball

Tyler Durden Re:why new balls (144 comments)

But if there is no difference between ball designs then why do we never see shots like these anymore?

about a month and a half ago
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Neanderthals Ate Their Veggies

Tyler Durden Re:That's not what my crossfit instructor told me! (151 comments)

It turns our that most people get the Paleo diet wrong. The diets of these people would differ wildly depending on the land they occupied.

For many of the myths espoused on what the Paleo diet was see here.

about 2 months ago
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Why China Is Worried About Japan's Plutonium Stocks

Tyler Durden Re:Two-thirds of a metric *TON*?! (398 comments)

And really, 640 kg of unused plutonium ought to be enough for anybody.

about 2 months ago
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Google Engineer: We Need More Web Programming Languages

Tyler Durden No (309 comments)

We don't need more web programming languages. Just one good one.

about 3 months ago
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Aliens and the Fermi Paradox

Tyler Durden Re:Progenitors? (686 comments)

...and we are indeed the first who will learn a lot of lessons as we swarm across the galaxy once we figure out how to get off this damn rock.

You know, I've heard this attitude many times before, and I just don't get it. The Earth is beautiful. We've evolved to see it as beautiful, and yet people still aren't able to enjoy they great things they have right here. Protip: if you can't be happy here on Earth then you're incapable of finding happiness no matter where you go.

about 3 months ago
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Scientists Find Method To Reliably Teleport Data

Tyler Durden Re:This research should receive enormous funding. (202 comments)

It's true that the GP is just representing one interpretation. Just thought I'd throw out my favorite "interpretation", (objective collapse theory) as it doesn't seem to get much love. No multiple worlds. No living-dead cats.

Also, instead of thinking of things being fundamentally composed of objects that are sort of both waves and particles I find it easier to picture them all as waves that only occasionally act as particles under the right conditions. This seems counter-intuitive since most of the world we experience is a result of these interactions that make them appear as particles. But it makes it a lot easier when picturing how things work with QFT and the difference between virtual and non-virtual "particles".

about 2 months ago
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Belief In Evolution Doesn't Measure Science Literacy

Tyler Durden Re:Wait a sec (772 comments)

Actually, this experiment makes a pretty good case that special and general relativity are a demonstrated facts. Unless there's some philosophical hair-splitting in the definitions I missed.

about 3 months ago
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Become a Linux Kernel Hacker and Write Your Own Module

Tyler Durden Re:"Daunting" (143 comments)

Well then I guess I'll just have to take your word for it Mister 914043. ;)

about 3 months ago
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Become a Linux Kernel Hacker and Write Your Own Module

Tyler Durden "Daunting" (143 comments)

You know, I'd like to think there was a time when the majority of Slashdot users could cheerfully take on writing modules for the Linux kernel or *gasp* just code in C.

about 3 months ago
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Why You Shouldn't Use Spreadsheets For Important Work

Tyler Durden Re:What he's really saying is (422 comments)

I know exactly how to use spreadsheets properly. Just don't.

about 3 months ago
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Professors: US "In Denial" Over Poor Maths Standards

Tyler Durden Re:danger will robinson (688 comments)

There is nothing deep about the concepts of addition and subtraction. Tell a young kid you have two different piles of a number of objects. Combine them into a big pile and count how many are in it. Now they've mastered the concept of addition. Take a pile of a certain number of objects. Remove a certain number from the pile, how much do you have left? By gum, the concept of subtraction has been mastered. The CC processes are tricks to do the calculations more quickly. And since we have calculators that can do that anyways, who cares?

Things get more complicated with fractions. One part that trips people up is how dividing a number > 0 by a fraction > 0 and 1 leads to a number greater than what you started with? (Assuming positive numbers). Say you have a medicine of 8 oz and you must drink 1 oz each day, how many days does it take to finish it? 8 days from 8 divided by 1. Now take the same 8 ounces and you have to drink 1/8 of an ounce a day - how long? Now the correct answer matches your intuition and it makes sense that you'd come up with something larger. THAT is an example of concepts, not calculation tricks.

My favorite example of a mathematical concept, something to introduce to students after they know simple arithmetic, is the method that a young Gauss came up with to quickly add the integers from 1 to 100. It's easy to understand, clever, can be easy to show how to generalize up to any number, and it begins to show the difference between arithmetic and math.

about 3 months ago
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Professors: US "In Denial" Over Poor Maths Standards

Tyler Durden Re:danger will robinson (688 comments)

But that' a big reason why we're arguing about this in the first place. If the first exposure kids have with math (arithmetic) is taught in such a way that they're put off by the subject then they're going to lose all interest before they even get to the real math.

about 3 months ago
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Professors: US "In Denial" Over Poor Maths Standards

Tyler Durden Re:danger will robinson (688 comments)

More important than breaking things up is getting an intuitive understanding of what you're doing in the first place. If you can do something fairly simply in a subject intuitively, but it's taught in a way that introduces many more steps that remove you from the intuition then your interest-level is going to go from 60 to "why bother" in five seconds. The old method has less steps to clutter things up. Want to be able to do arithmetic quickly? Use a calculator; it's what we invented them for. Math is far more interesting than arithmetic anyways.

To go slightly off-topic, I'd love to know if they have a method to evaluate whether or not their curriculum actually works on the student body at large. Schools spend a lot of effort evaluating teachers, but isn't the curriculum you tell the teachers to use at least as important as the teachers themselves? I don't know if there is any amount of evidence that could convince them if the curriculum was deficient. "Oh look, we completely changed how everything is taught and the scores are going down. Obviously the problem is the teachers! "

about 3 months ago

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