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Comments

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Programming Languages You'll Need Next Year (and Beyond)

UnknowingFool Re:Swift Popular? (260 comments)

How do we even know it's going to be popular in the first place? Does it solve any problem I can't do with C# or Python and/or on more platforms?

Considering that you can't really use C# or Python for iOS or OS X development, I would say that's one major thing you can't do.

It'll be a language for little hipsters who hope to be the next Steve Jobs by releasing yet another crappy useless iOS app. I don't know anyone who still bothers with iOS apps.

Then you must not know anyone who uses an iPhone meaning you live in a rather small world.

yesterday
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Programming Languages You'll Need Next Year (and Beyond)

UnknowingFool Re:We'll "need" Swift? (260 comments)

Need? No. You can still use Objective C if you want to code iOS/OS X. Want? Yes.

And while the rest of the featured languages are no-brainers with regard to popularity, it's an open question how long it might take Swift to become popular, given how hard Apple will push it as the language for developing on iOS.

Apple does not have to push very hard. After looking at it and Objective C, it doesn't take a genius to see why programmers would prefer it over Objective C.

yesterday
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Mac OS X Yosemite Beta Opens

UnknowingFool Re:Flat UI Design (165 comments)

Less CPU is a bonus for underpowered systems like mobile phones. I see it as less priority for a desktop/laptop. It may be part of a longer strategy to use more ARM processors in the future.

5 days ago
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Mac OS X Yosemite Beta Opens

UnknowingFool Re:Why does Apple charge for Mac OSX? (165 comments)

"identically specced" Only for very liberal interpretations for "identically specced". The problem is that when you actually try to build one identically-specced, in some cases, you'd find you spend more money on a PC than a Mac. There are specs you may not care about: small form factor, workstation processors, etc which may drive the price down. However ignoring them means you don't have an identically specced machine.

Take for example the cost of the video chips in the Mac Pro. It is actually cheaper to buy a Mac Pro upgrades than discrete cards. The D300 cards are roughly equivalent to the FirePro W7000 (~$750) while the D500 is almost equivalent to the W8000(~$1250). The D700 is roughly equivalent to a W9000 (~$3200). The prices are newegg prices. To upgrade from D300 to D500 is $400 on Apple. If you had two W7000 discrete cards, the upgrade price to dual W8000 would be $800. To upgrade to D700s would be $1000. To upgrade from dual W7000 to dual W9000 is $5500.

Now you make say you don't need workstation level cards, but that's the problem with your argument. Using a consumer level card would be cheaper; however, a Mac Pro is not designed for consumers. It's designed for professionals.

5 days ago
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Mac OS X Yosemite Beta Opens

UnknowingFool Re:Why does Apple charge for Mac OSX? (165 comments)

Apple hasn't charged for OS X since Mavericks. Then they charged before Mavericks:

  • 10.0 "Cheetah": $0
    I don't think there was a price as it was the first OS X to be installed on new machines.
  • 10.1 "Puma": $129
  • 10.2 "Jaguar": $129
  • 10.3 "Panther": $129
  • 10.4 "Tiger": $129
  • 10.5 "Leopard": $129
  • 10.6 "Snow Leopard": $29
  • 10.7 "Lion": $29
  • 10.8 "Mountain Lion": $19
  • 10.9 "Mavericks": $0
  • 10.10 "Yosemite": $0

5 days ago
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Mac OS X Yosemite Beta Opens

UnknowingFool Re:Flat UI Design (165 comments)

Nope. While I agree that skeumorphism may have gone too far in previous designs, the shift to flat UI takes away from functionality sometimes. I want to clearly tell if something is touchable/clickable as opposed to nonfunctional text/graphics. All I can say is that it's not quite as bad as Metro/Modern. But that's not saying much.

5 days ago
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Microsoft FY2014 Q4 Earnings: Revenues Up, Profits Down Slightly

UnknowingFool Re:This must be confusing to y'all (66 comments)

Getting stronger is subjective. If you analyze their performance, here's what you see: two divisions make up the majority of their revenue and profit. It appears to be Windows and Office. That is the same as 20 years ago.

  • Division Gross Margin (% or revenue)
  • Devices and Consumer Licensing: 93.8%
  • Computing and Gaming Hardware: 1.25%
  • Phone Hardware: 2.72%
  • Devices and Consumer Other: 23:72%
  • Commercial Licensing: 91.75%
  • Commercial Other: 30.54%

However when it comes to hardware, MS barely makes any profit.

about a week ago
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NASA Names Building For Neil Armstrong

UnknowingFool Re:Surprising (52 comments)

More importantly, the size and scale of the conspiracy would have to be massive. Tens of thousands of people worked on the program would have to be fooled. How many hundreds of thousands of people would have to work to keep ten thousand people fooled or not divulging? Neil deGrasse Tyson said it best in that only 3 people knew about Bill Clinton's sex scandal yet it got out. Also it would have cost the US government more money to create a hoax than it would to actually go to the moon. And they would have done such a piss poor job at it anyway.

Also they tend to fixate on a few things that seem to be the smoking gun; however, when looked in detail are not as definitive as they seem. For example photos from NASA show that shadows are not parallel. According to conspiracies, this must have been because more than one light source was present, ergo, it was staged. This however does not take into account that the surface of the moon is not flat. Mythbusters verified this.

Another one is the crosses (+) in the photos appear sometimes behind the subject instead of in front. This can only be because the crosses were added later to photos and not originally taken with the "moon" camera. Anyone with sufficient expertise photography knows that can be caused by overexposure. Overexposure was necessary for some photos in order to get a decent image. And the list goes on.

about a week ago
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X.Org Server 1.16 Brings XWayland, GLAMOR, Systemd Integration

UnknowingFool Re:Systemd? Not on my system... (225 comments)

And it hasn't been maintained in 12 years or so.

about two weeks ago
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X.Org Server 1.16 Brings XWayland, GLAMOR, Systemd Integration

UnknowingFool Re:Systemd? Not on my system... (225 comments)

I would have to disagree with the analogy of embrace and extend as systemd is open source whereas MS products were not. And you can use alternatives but it may be more work to maintain them.

about two weeks ago
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X.Org Server 1.16 Brings XWayland, GLAMOR, Systemd Integration

UnknowingFool Re:So... (225 comments)

Well init in my opinion is as the poster stated init is an excellent chef's knife. The problem is in the modern age, sometimes you need a screwdriver and sometimes you need scissors. Systemd can do all those things but it's not great at doing so. It's enough to get by.

about two weeks ago
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X.Org Server 1.16 Brings XWayland, GLAMOR, Systemd Integration

UnknowingFool Re:Systemd? Not on my system... (225 comments)

Well there are advantages to systemd whether you personally like it or not. Like automatic dependency handling, parallel service starts, monitoring built-in. And there are disadvantages too.

about two weeks ago
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X.Org Server 1.16 Brings XWayland, GLAMOR, Systemd Integration

UnknowingFool Re:Systemd? Not on my system... (225 comments)

Systemd vs init: It's the new emacs vs vi debate for the 21st century. :P

about two weeks ago
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Nearly 25 Years Ago, IBM Helped Save Macintosh

UnknowingFool Re:PPC macs were awful (236 comments)

Compared to Windows 95 it was worlds ahead. But that's not saying much. :P

about two weeks ago
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Climate Change Skeptic Group Must Pay Damages To UVA, Michael Mann

UnknowingFool Re:"Thus ends "Climategate." Hopefully." (497 comments)

You should really read the paper and not just the press release. This line in the press release hides a dirty little secret:

I have and there is no secret. The press release does a good job of summarizing the results.

Of the over 10,000 scientists contacted and the over 3,000 that replied they narrowed down the "climatologists who are active in research" to 79 individuals. The 97% figure represents just 77 people out of those 79.

Now that is a gross mischaracterization of the data. 10,000 scientists were contacted. Their expertise ranged from many disciplines. 3,146 responded. The two questions were asked with 90% and 82% voting "Yes" respectively (2831 and 2579). Out of the 3146, then the list was narrowed down to scientists who were actively publishing and more than 50% of their papers in climate science. That eliminated most of the respondents down to 79 which are basically the experts in the field.

Even if you discard the 97% number, the 90% and 82% are hard to ignore.

I'm amazed that anyone would answer no to either, particularly a "climatologist active in research".

Yet two experts did. There are biology professors like Michael Behe who argue for Intelligent Design instead of evolution based on very little evidence. Thankfully there are in the minority.

about two weeks ago
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Nearly 25 Years Ago, IBM Helped Save Macintosh

UnknowingFool Re:PPC macs were awful (236 comments)

Macs didn't "make USB", they forced it on their users while giving a big "fuck you" to all of their old customers running anything else. It's not like the old stuff was horrible either (ADB, SCSI).

The move to USB was a practical matter. One interface for low bandwidth connections: USB. One for high bandwidth ones: FireWire. It was about future proofing than legacy. And it had the effect that it brought down costs when you could use the same peripherals for Mac and PC if the drivers were there.

In the meantime, USB was everywhere on PCs. It just wasn't forced down everyone's throats. Even recent systems with USB3 quietly included will still include interfaces from the :"dark ages".

It also wasn't well supported until way after Apple made their change. Oh it was there. But adoption was poor. Drivers were non-existent or poor. Even Windows didn't have proper USB support til Windows 98. As for the dark ages, yes you can still get MBs with PS/2. I haven't used that port in a decade or more like I haven't used a serial or parallel port. I don't have a need.

about two weeks ago
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Nearly 25 Years Ago, IBM Helped Save Macintosh

UnknowingFool Re:Intel (236 comments)

At the time, PowerPC chips were more powerful than x86 in terms of raw computing power. I believe that the G5 Mac was technically classified as a supercomputer based on an old standard of flops and could not be exported until the US government updated the definitions.

The reason for the switchover to x86 had to do more with power efficiency, customization, and logistics. While the PowerPC architecture did lend itself to better overall computing performance, it was lacking in power efficiency and heat. For a desktop that's not a major problem, but it is a problem for laptops. It's a problem that IBM never really solved as they never released a mobile G5 and Apple was stuck with mobile G4s until the Intel switchover. Here is one area where Intel was way ahead.

The two other related issues have to do with Apple's needs and IBM and Motorola's manufacturing logistics. Apple despite ordering millions of chips a year was always going to be a small customer in terms of volume. However Apple was going to need a heavily customized consumer PowerPC chip that required to be updated almost every year. Meanwhile most other PowerPC customers would want server/workstation chips that IBM used in their own products. Now these can be done but these factors cost time and money. I can see why Motorola and IBM (and also Apple) would be less likely to invest into new chips.

On the flipside, the Xbox 360's Xenon processor would be more the model of what IBM/Motorola wanted. Although it was heavily customized, the basic design has not changed in 8 years when the Xbox One was launched with estimated sales of 40+ million. This gave IBM enough time to do a die shrink to cut costs.

The change to Intel gave Apple many advantages. First of all, faster and more efficient mobile processors were available. Second, most of the features that Apple wanted were already in the x86 design as they were designed for consumer PCs. Third, any customization Apple requested from Intel, Intel could sell to competitors like Dell. For example, the first MacBook Airs used customized Intel Core processors in which the chip package had been shrunk 40%. Intel didn't mind investing the money for this customization as they sold them immediately to other customers. Many of the features that Intel got in the collaboration became part of the Ultrabook specification.

about two weeks ago
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Climate Change Skeptic Group Must Pay Damages To UVA, Michael Mann

UnknowingFool Re:"Thus ends "Climategate." Hopefully." (497 comments)

OK, that was funny. But the 97% number is nonsense, just for the record. Skepticism about AGW catastrophism is rampant among the world's scientists at large (physicists, biologists, etc.), and many climate scientists have been cautiously coming out of the closet and poking sticks at the shaky foundations as well.

[Citation Needed]
This is the original press release about the 97%. By the way, the correct citation is "In analyzing responses by sub-groups, Doran found that climatologists who are active in research showed the strongest consensus on the causes of global warming, with 97 percent agreeing humans play a role. "

Basically the survey found that the experts in the field have 97% consensus. For overall numbers of scientists:

Two questions were key: have mean global temperatures risen compared to pre-1800s levels, and has human activity been a significant factor in changing mean global temperatures.
About 90 percent of the scientists agreed with the first question and 82 percent the second.

Ordinary people hear "supercomputer driven model simulation" and they think "oooh, it must be really accurate and able to predict the future".

No I think computer models are really the only thing we have as we don't have a spare planet to experiment upon and god-like powers. But with all models, I don't assume that they are all 100% accurate. But I think they can be constructed to be close enough to determine a reasonable outcome.

Anybody who understands statistics and the banal realities of computation knows the good old GIGO principle. Not to mention the reality that nobody has ever successfully predicted long term climate changes, so throwing a supercomputer at an impossible problem doesn't magically add credibility. *sigh*

No one has ever said that these models are 100% for all future predictions. Like most of science, theories (and models) that best fit observable data are used. And like most of science these are tested. I don't know if this is some sort of delusion or lack of understanding of how science works. Just because a scientist proposes something or releases a paper, it is not automatically accepted without challenge. Data is challenged. Conclusions are challenged.

All science is challenged. Consensus is reached after enough data and evidence is presented that favors the conclusions. Einstein's General Theory of Relativity wasn't accepted because Einstein proposed it. It took a solar eclipse before many physicists began to accept that it might be the best theory. Now by today's standards, the results of solar eclipse experiment would not have been enough.

about three weeks ago
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Windows 9 To Win Over Windows 7 Users, Disables Start Screen For Desktop

UnknowingFool Re:Why didn't they just listen to users? (681 comments)

The problem with the "features" that MS touted were they weren't really features. Squirting could have been neat if it hadn't been so crippled. Compared to other MP3 players that played PlaysForSure v1, the Zune didn't offer anything that extraordinary over the iPod ecosystem. Both only operated with 1 device family. These days that doesn't matter as much as DRM has largely been removed. At best the Zune was slightly better than other MP3 players but not as good as the iPod Touch.

about a month ago
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Windows 9 To Win Over Windows 7 Users, Disables Start Screen For Desktop

UnknowingFool Re:Why didn't they just listen to users? (681 comments)

Win 8 was about forcing users to use Metro so MS could catch up in tablets and hybrids by leveraging the desktop. MS was behind Apple and Google on tablets even though they had a decade head start. But rather than allow users to pick Metro, MS probably feared that consumers would adopt it as much as they adopted the Zune. The Zune wasn't a bad product besides the poor color choice of brown. Sure the Zune beat out an iPod Classic, but it was not a "wow" product that offered anything significant over the iPod Touch. Thus it never got much traction. If MS had released a different UI for Win 8, a consumer would never pick Metro for their desktops. Thus they would be unfamiliar with it when it came to tablets and hybrids.

about a month ago

Submissions

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Supreme Court rules for and against EPA on greenhouse gases

UnknowingFool UnknowingFool writes  |  about a month ago

UnknowingFool (672806) writes "In Utility Air Regulatory Group v. EPA, the Supreme Court ruled against the EPA on some limits to greenhouse gases but also upheld other limits. In a 5-4 partial decision, the high court ruled that EPA overstepped their authority in requiring permits only for greenhouse gases for new and modified facilities using the Clean Air act. Such regulatory action can only be granted by Congress. But in the same case on a 7-2 decision, the court also ruled that the EPA can enforce greenhouse gas limits on facilities that already require permits for other air pollutants. This leaves intact the most of the new regulations proposed by the Obama administration earlier this month as many coal plants produce other air pollutants that can be regulated by the EPA."
Link to Original Source
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MS to sell Xbox One without Kinect and separate Apps from Live Gold

UnknowingFool UnknowingFool writes  |  about 3 months ago

UnknowingFool (672806) writes "Starting June 9, MS will offer a $399 Xbox One that will not be come with a Kinect peripheral. Many fans wanted the Kinect optional as they did not feel the need for it. Additionally streaming apps like Netflix, Hulu Plus, YouTube and HBO Go will no longer require a Live Gold subscription. There are some apps like Game DVR that will require Live Gold."
Link to Original Source
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Supreme Court makes it easier to get lawyers fees in patent cases

UnknowingFool UnknowingFool writes  |  about 2 months ago

UnknowingFool (672806) writes "In a pair of unanimous rulings yesterday, the Supreme Court made it easier for defendants in patent cases to collect attorneys fees if the litigation was frivolous. In the first case, Octane Fitness v. Icon Health & Fitness , the court ruled that a standard used by lower courts to award attorney's fees was impossible to meet. The original standard under Brooks Furniture Mfg., Inc. v. Dutailier Int’l, Inc. had ruled that a claim had to be both “objectively baseless” and “brought in subjective bad faith” before fees could be awarded. The high court ruled that fees should be awarded merely when the case is “exceptional” and not when the defendant must prove there was zero merit.

In the second case, Highmark v. Allcare Health Management , the Supreme Court also noted the “exceptional” standard in reversing the appellate court's decision but specifically ruled that appellate courts should give more deference to the lower courts on rulings of fact. In Highmark, the district court found that Allcare had engaged in a pattern of “vexatious” and “deceitful” conduct throughout the litigation and awarded fees. The appellate court while agreeing with the lower court about part of the case reversed the fees in their de novo review of the case. In de novo reviews, the court case is essentially retried with the higher court. The Supreme Court iterated that de novo reviews should be done typically for “questions of law” and reviews on “questions of fact” are done if there are clear errors with decisions on matters of discretion “reviewable for ‘abuse of discretion.’” In other words, the appellate courts can review a case if a lower court has not correctly interpreted law; however, they should not retry a lower case on facts unless the lower court made a clear error. Also unless the lower court abused their power in some way, the appellate court should not review their final decisions.

For example, if a person is tried for murder, an appellate court could rule that a district court misinterpreted a statute about sentencing if the person if found guilty. The appellate court should not retry the facts of the case unless the lower court had made a clear error like ruling that there was a DNA match when there was not. Also an appellate court should not reverse the lower court if they sentenced the person to a reasonable time. Now if the district court sentenced the person to 400 years for one murder, then the appellate court should intervene.

In effect the two rulings make it easier for companies to recover money should they be sued in frivolous patent lawsuits. This would make the risks greater for those who sue."

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GM announces first female CEO Mary Barra

UnknowingFool UnknowingFool writes  |  about 8 months ago

UnknowingFool (672806) writes "Right after the US Treasury Department sold off its last stake in GM, two surprises followed . First, CEO Dan Akerson announced his retirement, and the board chose long-time employee Mary Barra as his replacement as GM's first female CEO. While there will be comparisons to Carly Fiorina because of gender, there are major differences between the two situations. Barra has been with GM for 33 years and started working as a university co-op student while Fiorina was hired from Lucent. Barra started out as a plant engineer before completing her MBA and rising through the ranks to varied positions like plant manager, head of HR, and senior vice president of global product development while Fiorina was always in management."
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SCOTUS agrees to hear case to clarify software patents

UnknowingFool UnknowingFool writes  |  about 8 months ago

UnknowingFool (672806) writes "The Supreme Court agreed today to hear the case of Alice Corporation Pty. Ltd. v. CLS Bank International to help establish clearer guidelines on what may be patented in software. The case involves Alice Corporation who holds four patents originating in the 1990s of which was for "a computerized system for creating and exchanging financial instruments such as derivatives." These patents were challenged by CLS Bank International in 2007. The district court ruled summarily for CLS in that none of patents were valid. The Federal Circuit initially reversed the lower court; however, the full panel (en banc) voted (7 out of 10) to affirm the district court but also issued 5 separate concurring and dissenting opinions.

This confusion was noted by the Electronic Frontier Foundation in its amicus brief:

" . . . the Federal Circuit has failed to implement a workable standard—or, frankly, any standard at all—as to what computer- and Internet-implemented inventions are patentable. The resulting legal instability has driven up the already-ballooning costs of patent litigation . . ."

In my opinion, it appears that main patent simply added "on the computer" to an existing process, namely in an business transaction between two parties, there is a third party that ensures that payment is made and is facilitated. The computer made the transaction faster and more automated as noted by Judge Lourie in his opinion.

“simply appending generic computer functionality to lend speed or efficiency to the performance of an otherwise abstract concept does not meaningfully limit claim scope for purposes of patent eligibility.

"

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US FDA moves to ban trans fat

UnknowingFool UnknowingFool writes  |  about 9 months ago

UnknowingFool (672806) writes "Citing growing health concerns about trans fat, the FDA today proposed measures to eliminate it from the US food supply. While trans fat can still be used, the new measures now place the burden on food processors to justify the inclusion of it in a food product as experts have maintained that there is no safe level of consumption and no health benefits. Since 2006, the amount of trans far eaten by the average American has declined from 4.5g per serving to less than 1g as restaurants and the food industry have reduced their use of it. There will be a 60 day public comment period for the new proposal."
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Blockbuster to close remaining US locations

UnknowingFool UnknowingFool writes  |  about 9 months ago

UnknowingFool (672806) writes "Blockbuster announced that it will close its remaining 300 US locations by January and discontinue the DVD by mail service. Before being bought out by Dish, the chain was slowly closing locations. From an all time high of 9,000 locations in 2004, the chain has fallen on hard times and had emerged from bankruptcy in 2011."
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Blackberry ends attempts to sell itself, will replace CEO

UnknowingFool UnknowingFool writes  |  about 9 months ago

UnknowingFool (672806) writes "Blackberry has announced it will no longer sell itself and will attempt to raise $1B from investors and shareholders. Also CEO Thorston Heins will leave in two weeks, replaced by John Chen, former CEO of Sybase. This is the second change in leadership in the last two years as Blackerry's finances have struggled against the rise of Apple and Android smartphones."
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Windows 8.1 for RT update pulled from Windows store

UnknowingFool UnknowingFool writes  |  about 9 months ago

UnknowingFool (672806) writes "After reports of update problems including bricking of some devices, Microsoft has pulled the 8.1 update for RT from their store while they investigate.



"Microsoft is investigating a situation affecting a limited number of users updating their Windows RT devices to Windows RT 8.1. As a result, we have temporarily removed the Windows RT 8.1 update from the Windows Store. We are working to resolve the situation as quickly as possible and apologize for any inconvenience. We will provide updates as they become available"

While update problems are not new to software, could this be a consequence of MS not releasing 8.1 RTM to developers? Developers may have experienced problems earlier and alerted MS before it went live."
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Yale "Freakonomics" professor: Bing is not preferred 2:1 as Microsoft claims

UnknowingFool UnknowingFool writes  |  about 10 months ago

UnknowingFool (672806) writes "In 2009, Microsoft launched a national TV and print advertising campaign for Bing claiming that their study showed that it was preferred 2 to 1 over Google in search results in a head-to-head challenge reminiscent of the Pepsi challenges from the 1980s. MS then invited consumers to take their own test at www.bingiton.com.

Yale law professor Ian Ayres (of Freakonomics fame) and his law students published a paper On their study that found that Google was preferred over Bing 53% to 41% with 6% ties. This was far from the 2:1 ratio MS claimed. Professor Ayres matched the small sample size (1000 people). Although the commercials gives the impression that the results of the MS was a head-to-head street challenge, the results came from a online study MS commissioned through Answer Research.

Noted differences between the two studies was that the Yale study randomly assigned the user one of three different sets of searches: 1) Bing supplied searches, 2) top 25 web searches, or 3) user defined searches. One Bing searches the results were almost the same but users preferred Google in the other two sets. Another main difference is that MS has not published the methodology used or tracked individual user responses.

Legally, one conclusion of the study was that Google might have a deceptive advertising suit against Microsoft."

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Surface Pro 2 and Surface 2: With new kickstand!

UnknowingFool UnknowingFool writes  |  about a year ago

UnknowingFool (672806) writes "For consumers who had hoped that Microsoft would greatly upgrade their recent entries into the tablet market, leaks and rumors have said that both machines will receive modest hardware changes. Surface Pro 2 will sport new Haswell processors which will increase battery life to 7 hours. RAM is expected to increase from 4GB to 8GB. Surface (formerly RT) will get Tegra 4 processors. The only other confirmed change will be new kickstands that have 2 positions instead of one."
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Parallels for iPad: Game Changer for Productivity?

UnknowingFool UnknowingFool writes  |  about a year ago

UnknowingFool (672806) writes "While the iPad has been a tranformative tool for consumers and businesses, it suffers in productivity due to the focus of the device more on the consumption side than the productivity side. This gap may be bridged with a new app by virtualization software maker Parallels, Inc. called Parallels for iPad. Unlike Parallels for Mac, this program does not simply add hardware virtualization to run other OSs like Windows, Linux, etc. Instead this software installed on a desktop and iPad will act a server/client to an iPad so that the iPad can run "applified" versions of desktop software like Word, Excel, etc.

What this means is that users can now run productivity software from their desktops on their iPads. While the effectiveness using a touch GUI with applications not designed for touch has not been demonstrated, Parallels says that Parallels with translate the touch UI interactions into desktop ones. Some writers say this spells bad news for Microsoft and others. Users will not need to buy mobile app versions of their software. These are downsides to the app. First the $79.99/yr price tag. Second it requires a constant Internet connection so airplane mode is not likely possible."

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Xbox One launch delayed in 8 countries

UnknowingFool UnknowingFool writes  |  about a year ago

UnknowingFool (672806) writes "At E3, Microsoft announced plans to launch the Xbox One in 21 countries in November. Now MS has announced that launch in Belgium, Denmark, Finland, Netherlands, Norway, Russia, Sweden, Switzerland will be delayed to 2014. Countries that are still scheduled for November release are Australia, Austria, Brazil, Canada, France, Germany, Ireland, Italy, Mexico, Spain, United Kingdom, United States and New Zealand. MS has not announced a new launch date only that it would be available "as soon as possible". It seems to me that consumers in Denmark, Belgium, Netherlands, and Switzerland can just cross the border into a neighboring country and get the Xbox One if they wanted."
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Microsoft: Xbox One will no longer require Kinect to function

UnknowingFool UnknowingFool writes  |  about a year ago

UnknowingFool (672806) writes "Microsoft has reversed course on another aspect of the Xbox One. Though the console will come bundled with a Kinect sensor, the console will work without it. Critics were had suggested that an always-on video and audio sensor could be used to spy on users. This is the latest reversal from Microsoft since the E3 unveil."
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Windows 8.1 To Be Relased Mid-October

UnknowingFool UnknowingFool writes  |  about a year ago

UnknowingFool (672806) writes "According to sources, Microsoft will release 8.1 to the public in mid-October. For those that don't know 8.1 will attempt to correct many of the issues with Windows 8. Some issues like the Start button have not been really addressed in the minds of many here on Slashdot. The release puts Windows 8.1 in time for the holiday season."
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Latest SCO Claim: Novell decision "has no bearing" on remaining case

UnknowingFool UnknowingFool writes  |  about a year ago

UnknowingFool (672806) writes "In June 2013, Judge David Nuffer allowed SCO v IBM to continue after a long delay due to SCO's bankruptcy proceedings. He asked that SCO to file a brief on which claims were closed by the Novell judgement where Novell was found to be the owner of UNIX and UNIX copyrights. SCO filed its brief titled: "Proposed Judgment Dismissing SCO's Claims Mooted by the Final Judgment in SCO v. Novell" where they listed three claims where the Novell decision "has no bearing":
  • VI: Unfair Competition where IBM is accused to undermining and destroying UNIX and harming SCO in Project Monterrey by giving to Linux "SCO’s valuable [UNIX] source code"
  • VII: Interference with Contract where IBM supposedly encouraged others to develop Linux by reverse engineering, modifying, and creating derivative works of UNIX
  • IX: Interference with Business Relationships where IBM discouraged others from doing business with SCO. (I believe SCO suing everyone did that).

IBM not only responded that there were no claims left, they objected to the term "mooted" as IBM points out: "The claims are not moot; they are barred under principles of issue preclusion (or collateral estoppel)." From my understanding, "moot" means unsettled but unimportant which IBM points out that the claims were decided and SCO cannot re-litigate them again. IBM also points out in that Project Monterrey in VI was not a "joint venture" as SCO describes it."
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NVidia CEO: We are working on next generation Surface

UnknowingFool UnknowingFool writes  |  about a year ago

UnknowingFool (672806) writes "CEO Jen-Hsun Huang has told CNET that NVidia is working with Microsoft on the next generation of Surface tablets. While sales of the first generation have been poor, Huang believes the second generation will be more successful with the inclusion of Outlook."
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Descendants of Henrietta Lacks grants consent to her genomic data

UnknowingFool UnknowingFool writes  |  about a year ago

UnknowingFool (672806) writes "In an agreement with the NIH, the descendants of Henrietta Lacks agreed to allow her genome to be used for research under certain conditions. Use of the data will require approval of a special group which two of her descendants are members.

The story is chronicle in the book, The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks: In 1951, Henrietta Lacks, a poor mother of five died of cervical cancer. Tumor cells were harvested before her death without her consent. Later researchers discovered that the cells thrived in the lab, one of the first ones to do so. Also the cells did not die after a few divisions (immortal). These desirable characteristics made them sought after for medical research. Named the HeLa line, it became the basis of an estimated 74,000 studies over the next 62 years including Salk's work on the polio vaccine.

The ethical problem however was that she never consented, and until the 1970s, her family did not know about their use. Also many lucrative medical advances were made that used her cells while she died too poor to afford a headstone. More recently different groups have tried publishing her entire genome to the protest of her family which seemed like another injustice."

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Best Buy to add Microsoft stores within their stores

UnknowingFool UnknowingFool writes  |  about a year ago

UnknowingFool (672806) writes "Best Buy and Microsoft will launch 600 Microsoft stores within Best Buy retail locations in a store within a store concept. The Microsoft stores will occupy 1500-2000 sq ft within each location. The terms of the deal are not announced but I assume it benefits both as Best Buy would likely charge rent to help with declining revenue. For Microsoft, they may get cheaper facilities than building their own stores. The last I heard MS had a very ambitious plan to launch hundreds of stores a year.

I have doubts about the success of this venture considering anecdotally almost every MS store I've seen in my travels was nearly empty. Since they all were located near Apple stores the stark difference in foot traffic was apparent. The only exception was the MS store near Redmond which had a decent crowd."

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Blackberry CEO: Tablets will be dead in 5 years

UnknowingFool UnknowingFool writes  |  about a year ago

UnknowingFool (672806) writes ""In five years I donâ(TM)t think thereâ(TM)ll be a reason to have a tablet anymore," Blackberry CEO Thoratein said in an interview with Bloomberg. This is opposite to the growth that analysts like have speculated. It might be comparable to PDAs where smartphones have largely replaced them. Certainly the tablet is an in-between devices but it's not clear what will replace it in this role. It may be a case of sour grapes as Blackberry's PlayBook has failed to capture any significant market share."
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