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An Algorithm to End the Lines for Ice at Burning Man

UnknownSoldier Re: Agner Krarup Erlang - The telephone in 1909! (311 comments)

Yeah this is basic Computer Science -- IIRC we studied this in the Operating Systems courses.

Check-in at the airport does this too.

yesterday
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Google Changes 'To Fight Piracy' By Highlighting Legal Sites

UnknownSoldier Re:Yeah, Good Luck with That (TM) (146 comments)

Yes, the ridiculous length is indeed a problem.

The "evils" of copyright was debated back in 1841 !!

"The easiest form of parochialism to fall into is to assume that we are smarter than the past generations, that our thinking is necessarily more sophisticated. This may be true in science and technology, but not necessarily so in wisdom."
  -- "Macaulay on Copyright"

http://www.kuro5hin.org/story/...

yesterday
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Google Changes 'To Fight Piracy' By Highlighting Legal Sites

UnknownSoldier Re:Yeah, Good Luck with That (TM) (146 comments)

Correct. The dirty secret of Copyright is that it was invented by --> Publishers <-- to maintain control by preventing other publishers from making a profit !!

I've posted about this in the past ...

"The history of copyright law starts with early privileges and monopolies granted to printers of books. The British Statute of Anne 1710, full title "An Act for the Encouragement of Learning, by vesting the Copies of Printed Books in the Authors or purchasers of such Copies, during the Times therein mentioned", was the first copyright statute. Initially copyright law only applied to the copying of books."

and

"Pope Alexander VI issued a bull in 1501 against the unlicensed printing of books and in 1559 the Index Expurgatorius, or List of Prohibited Books, was issued for the first time."

and

"The first copyright privilege in England bears date 1518 and was issued to Richard Pynson, King's Printer, the successor to William Caxton. The privilege gives a monopoly for the term of two years. The date is 15 years later than that of the first privilege issued in France. Early copyright privileges were called "monopolies," ...

and

"In England the printers, known as stationers, formed a collective organization, known as the Stationers' Company. In the 16th century the Stationers' Company was given the power to require all lawfully printed books to be entered into its register. Only members of the Stationers' Company could enter books into the register. This meant that the Stationers' Company achieved a dominant position over publishing in 17th century England"

History of Copyright Law

yesterday
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Google Changes 'To Fight Piracy' By Highlighting Legal Sites

UnknownSoldier Re:Yeah, Good Luck with That (TM) (146 comments)

Incorrect.

As a kid for the longest time I couldn't see or reason how simply copying a number* was illegal.

* Where on the Apple ][ //e this number was 2 nibbles / byte * 256 bytes * 16 sectors * 34 tracks = 278, 528 hex digits.

yesterday
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Google Changes 'To Fight Piracy' By Highlighting Legal Sites

UnknownSoldier Yeah, Good Luck with That (TM) (146 comments)

When "piracy" became hijacked from meaning the naval context, copying was rampant. In the 80's as kids we couldn't afford all the games so we (illegally) shared them. Hell, I got into computers simply because it was a fun challenge to "krack" software. In the 90's In college/university we used BBS's, FSP (how many know about _that_ protocol!!), FTP with hidden directories containing control characters, IRC with XDCC, binary newsgroup with split .RARs., in 2000's we used Torrents and/or P2P such as Emule, etc. It wasn't until years later did we learn that piracy = lack of respect for the author's distribution. As adults we buy things because we want to support the author(s) to produce more. And if it is crap we vote with our wallet -- and tell others to not buy it.

What is kind of ironic and completely counter-intuitive is that those who pirate tend to spend more but that is a discussion for another day. (Part of the problem is that certain "assets" are not even available to be legally purchased, etc.)

IMHO Piracy begins AND ends with education. Futurama's Bender made fun of this "archaic philosophy" that "Sharing is illegal" by joking "You wouldn't steal X, right? Or would I !" meme along with the popular "You wouldn't download car?" Because most people are able to separate the issue from money vs freedom. i.e. Artists want to share their creations. Consumers want to share those same creations -- that is what culture does -- preserves "popular" art in whatever medium. Unfortunately the context behind those same reason's don't always sync up. You have bands like The Who who don't care about "bootlegging"; other sellout bands like Metallica that only care about the money and could care less if fans help "market" the band.

Kids these day's aren't stupid. They are questing the status quo that: "Why is illegal sharing illegal? Because of arbitrary financial reasons??" id software created the shareware model -- give part of the game away for free, customers can spend money to buy the rest. These days Humble Bundles let people pay what they want. IMHO this is the correct way to do things. Compromise between 2 conflicting ideals. Open Source or Creative Commons is another approach.

Google making it harder to find digital goods is not going to change a dam thing. Google wasn't around when we were kids and piracy was rampant. Removing a search engine will only drive the process back underground when it peaked with The Pirate Bay in the mid 2000's.

Piracy has existed since the beginning of the network. Any technological means to try to remove it is like pissing in the ocean. Yeah good luck with that !

yesterday
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Python-LMDB In a High-Performance Environment

UnknownSoldier Re:Wikipedia article deleted (98 comments)

Some of Wikipedia's rules are ass-backwards asinine. Such as Avoid Trivia

One man's trivia is another man's noise.

Oh I see, so only if it is _popular_ does the "truthiness" count.

Fuck that. I want an _inclusive_ dictionary / encyclopedia / reference, not an _exclusive_ based on some "arbitrary" rules simply because something is not popular. I am there in the first place to _learn_ about things I don't know about ! Not because some asshat decided "not enough people care about this topic."

It is not like a extra web page take up THAT much storage in the first place.

4 days ago
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Data From Windows 10 Feedback Tool Exposes Problem Areas

UnknownSoldier Re:As it is designed to do (138 comments)

Indeed. Reminds me of that old joke ...

"If builders built buildings the way programmers wrote programs, then the first woodpecker that came along would destroy civilization." -- Murphy's (Computer) Laws

While funny it is sad to see that the state of software really hasn't progressed much in the last 20+ years. Businesses still cut corner to minimize expenses. Programs still have shitty UI. Keyboard accelerators / shortcuts along with manuals have gone the way of the dodo. Help has moved to being online only -- with the help index being a complete joke lacking common search terms. We've gone from 1 MHz to 4 GHz machines which is over 3 orders of magnitudes difference and we _still_ wait. Every day we hear of yet-another-device (or company) getting hacked / p0wned / etc. Security is a complete joke at most places.

One of the few good things is that never before has so much computing power been so inexpensive.

Along the way we lost the "human element". We don't build machines for other machines for but for _people_ to use. Why do computers _still_ continue to suck? Because we doing it ass-backwards. We're forcing people to adopt to some shitty UI instead of making the computer adapt to us. But that isn't the complete picture.

There is a meta problem looming. This video seems relevant ...

https://www.youtube.com/watch?...

5 days ago
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Data From Windows 10 Feedback Tool Exposes Problem Areas

UnknownSoldier Re:Windows 7 (138 comments)

Let's analyze these "reasons" ...

* virtual desktops -- Virtual Desktops are hidden in Win7 ... gee, let's copy OSX which has had it for *years*
* a rumored tabs in explorer -- xplorer2 has supported this for years
* kernel level sandboxing that all browsers can use -- Sandboxie does it for ALL applications
* much improved power consumption -- we are talking pennies a month on a desktop .. big whoop
* directx 12 with low cpu overhead -- not a fan of forced obsolescence. Games _still_ support DX9 for crying out loud. We already went through this shit with Vista and DirectX 11.
* USB 3 support -- with what devices??

So basically $100 for features that MS should of done **years** ago that I can get elsewhere. *Yawn*.

5 days ago
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Data From Windows 10 Feedback Tool Exposes Problem Areas

UnknownSoldier Re:As it is designed to do (138 comments)

The "best" part is that Microsoft STILL can't get the Control Panel consistent !

OSX does a far better consistent job .. OSX 10.0 .. OSX 10.9.

Microsoft doesn't have a clue about good UI.

5 days ago
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Confidence Shaken In Open Source Security Idealism

UnknownSoldier Re:Open Source in commercial products (264 comments)

Your pedantry is "almost" correct. ;-)

The only program that is bug-free is the trivial one liner.

NOP // assembly no-operation

Though some would argue:

int foo = 0;

is bug free since without input, and output, whatever "calculation" you do is pointless & void.

Software runs on the _assumption_ that the hardware is

a) functioning ...
  b) ... correctly!

We have almost no way to guarantee that in software. Sure we have ECC RAM but what else? Anything more then 1 line is making these assumptions and therefore is a candidate for being buggy.

So I would revise your statement:

"All non-trivial software is buggy."

about a week ago
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How Women Became Gamers Through D&D

UnknownSoldier Re:Where is this "disdain" coming from? (238 comments)

I miss the days of playing CTF when everyone would say "GG" for good game after the match eded. The complete lack of "sportsman conduct" definitely turns a lot of us older gamers off.

That is an excellent point -- the more companies try to control the servers the less options server admins have.

The more power game devs give to the server admins the more power can be used to keep the community good.

You are spot on with consequences is the best way for people to learn. Positive Reinforcement or Negative Reinforcement. Direct feedback is a way to help the person retain and recall the option to chose differently.

about a week ago
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Confidence Shaken In Open Source Security Idealism

UnknownSoldier Re:pay them!! (264 comments)

100% agree!

If businesses were smart they all would chip in $10 say towards LibreOffice, Inkscape, Krita, FreeNAS, GimpShop, etc.

They could be free of the tyranny of proprietary vendor-lock file formats for once and for all. But yet they would rather pay to suffer ! **shrugs**

Could you image how much development could get done if open source alternatives to X could get funding!? Not say money is a silver bullet TM but it certainly would go a long way!

about a week ago
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Confidence Shaken In Open Source Security Idealism

UnknownSoldier Re:Open Source in commercial products (264 comments)

> was visible in source code for 20 years and until now nobody found it. This includes the black-hats. Not sure what this means...

As opposed to close source? That doesn't change the reality that ...

ALL software has bugs.

Now at a pragmatic level at least the open source ones are _eventually_ found -- we have no idea, or guarantee, when or If the closed source ones will ever be found !

about a week ago
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How Women Became Gamers Through D&D

UnknownSoldier Re:Where is this "disdain" coming from? (238 comments)

> The ratios are close to even in social games (including MMOs), not so much for shooter/wargames.

Can you blame them? Hell, I don't either want to listen to some 14 year old f-bomb this, f-bomb that, trash talk and whine about everything and not learn a dam thing about _teamwork_.

Thank God for private servers, and SourceMod to freeze / slay / ban the little shits.

about a week ago
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Confidence Shaken In Open Source Security Idealism

UnknownSoldier Re:I don't buy it (264 comments)

Open Source software is legally free!"
"So? On bittorrent, any software is free"
You forgot most likely illegal -- just because the "cost" appears to be zero for you, doesn't mean it is legally free.

FTFY.

about a week ago
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Flight Attendants Want Stricter Gadget Rules Reinstated

UnknownSoldier Re:That's not the reason you're being ignored. (404 comments)

Exactly.

I just bury my head in a book or solving the sudoku in this month's magazine. See, no "technology" required.

So this petition for "re-ban" will still make me ignore the instructions that I've heard before.

about a week ago

Submissions

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Quantum Levivation

UnknownSoldier UnknownSoldier writes  |  about 3 years ago

UnknownSoldier (67820) writes "Wired reports that researchers at Tel Aviv University have discovered you can "lock" a magnetic field into place with a semiconductor. They have a very cool demonstration of a frozen puck and some of the neat things you can do with it while its orientation remains locked but its location is movable. Might someday we see high speed trains that will be "impossible" to tip over or a new generation of batteries with this technology?"
Link to Original Source

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