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Comments

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Steve Jobs Dead At 56

VJ42 Re:http://www.apple.com/stevejobs/ (1613 comments)

His final will stated that he be buried in a glossy white coffin with no visible hinges or latches. RIP Steve.

Not just dead but iDead - a new more stylish type of dead, released just in time for Christmas...

RIP Steve

more than 2 years ago
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CERN Experiment Indicates Faster-Than-Light Neutrinos

VJ42 Re:Einstein replied "Check your measurements, son" (1088 comments)

It's OK I'll - licence the tech and copy Apples, Amazons, MSs, Googles, Nokias, Samsungs and IBMs patents so I can patent troll them by filing before them... ;p

more than 2 years ago
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CERN Experiment Indicates Faster-Than-Light Neutrinos

VJ42 Re:Why is this impossible? (1088 comments)

Not only did they have the shape of the world sorted out,

You don't actually need any eqipment or even maths to work this out - you just need to look out to sea when a ship is arriving on a clear day. The mast & sails come into view over the horizon before the bow & then the rest of the hull. All of which slowly come into view. It's not rocket science to work out that it appears to be comeing over a curved surface.

more than 2 years ago
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CERN Experiment Indicates Faster-Than-Light Neutrinos

VJ42 Re:Einstein replied "Check your measurements, son" (1088 comments)

Oh c'mon. Next thing you're going to say is that there's no Santa.

This is as close as it comes for a geek, anyway. I'm going to bet on a physics revolution overthrowing the Standard Model just because it's long overdue, and because it would be fun, and because maybe now we can get a spare few billion for more research (but then, if true, we sure are going to need them!).

This is the great thing about science & scientists - I'll bet the majority of us want those neutrinos to be going faster than light, even the ones who are trying to find mistakes, because wholesale revolution of scientific consus is *fun* - specially in physics. Just think of the possibilities if we have inadvertantly found a way of FTL communication; good times...

more than 2 years ago
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First Observational Test of the "Multiverse"

VJ42 Re:BS (258 comments)

I bet you personally aren't paying for shit, but receiving some government subsidy one way or another and just want others to pay for everything.

I'm gainfully employed and pay my taxes; I'm happy for a portion of those taxes to fund this project - what more do you expect from me?

As to my comments, they are general in nature,

As were mine; I'm quite happy for my taxes to fund fundamental scientific research that has no commercial merit, but expands our understanding of the way the universe works as the private sector has no incentive to do so. Another good example of this type of research is the LHC at CERN. Indeed, I would like a higher proportion of my taxes to go towards scientific endeavour, and less towards things like (for example) over-budget, under performing government IT systems.

more than 2 years ago
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FAA Taking a Look At News Corp's Use of Drone

VJ42 Re:FAA Shutdown (252 comments)

Would you really be comfortable walking away from your job just because the pay stopped temporarily? Don't pretend that wouldn't be held against you...

I'd sue for Constructive dismissal, but then I live in the UK where we actually have some employment rights.

more than 2 years ago
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First Observational Test of the "Multiverse"

VJ42 Re:BS (258 comments)

What I accept with much less enthusiasm is government spending on it or anything, actually.

From your other posts, I assume you're in the US, so it's not your government spending the money - it's mine. Thanks for your concern, but I'm happy for them to do so as I think fundemental science research, such as this, is an area that government should fund due to the lack of economic incentive.

more than 2 years ago
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Ripping CDs Set To Be Legalized In UK

VJ42 Re:Copy protection (156 comments)

"This is just catching up to the state of the art of the mid 90s, when people started (perfectly reasonably) ripping unencrypted cds to their hard drives. These people are now no longer criminals."

Just to nit pick. They are making the action legal in the future. However all of us that have done so in the past and might well do so again before the law comes into effect are still filthy criminals. We broke the law and we could technically still be arrested and prosecuted for it even after the law comes into effect.

Not really, this is a civil matter so you'd have to be sued by the BPI (UK equivilent of RIAA) - and even they think that format shifting should be legal: http://www.telegraph.co.uk/technology/apple/7299505/Millions-of-iPod-fans-breaking-law-by-copying-CDs.html
Note the last paragraph " we have never taken any action against consumers who rip CDs to computers or portable music players. Nonetheless, we do believe it would be better for personal CD ripping to be legal and the industry has made proposals to Government to achieve that." As they want to legalise format shifting as well, I don't think they're about to sue you for it.

more than 2 years ago
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Ripping CDs Set To Be Legalized In UK

VJ42 Re:Kudos (156 comments)

I am not trying to be a pessimist here, but I would think there is some small loophole in the new law, that would give the British equivalent of RIAA or MPAA some leverage. Anyone knows anything about this ?

I would doubt it. If its currently illegal, they would have sued 90% of the UK population by now for breaking it. Anyone who owns an MP3 player would almost certainly be guilty.

Yeah, even the BPI realises that format shifting being against the law is stupid:

"In practice, we have never taken any action against consumers who rip CDs to computers or portable music players. Nonetheless, we do believe it would be better for personal CD ripping to be legal and the industry has made proposals to Government to achieve that.”

source: http://www.telegraph.co.uk/technology/apple/7299505/Millions-of-iPod-fans-breaking-law-by-copying-CDs.html

more than 2 years ago
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Anonymous To Release Sun, News of the World Emails

VJ42 Re:You know you have a PR problem (363 comments)

day one of a scandal

It most certainly wasn't day one when NoTW closed - this scandal has literally been going on years - an NoTW employee & a private investigator were jailed a couple of years back because of it. No one was paying much attention until it was found they had been hacking a dead girl's phone; at that point there was a lot of public pressure on advertisers who then started to pull out of the NoTW one by one at which point News International decided to call it quits as they had wanted to turn the sun into a 7 day operation anyway...

about 3 years ago
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Give The Onion a Pulitzer Campaign Gaining Steam

VJ42 Re:Why Not? (110 comments)

they have no credibility as a news source since they never say "This is the news, this is actually happening." They have never made any -false- statements about the current events, but they haven't made any true statements about current events either. If they have any credibility as a news source for that,

They have credibility because they at least admit they're making stuff up. It's like art, they reveal a larger truth by showing falsehoods. That's why they have credibility. Other news organisations just make stuff up and pretend it's some how newsworthy.

more than 3 years ago
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Man Robs Bank of $1 To Get Health Care In Jail

VJ42 Re:Sad, but I can see doing it too (950 comments)

In contrast to not knowing what I'm paying for, I know the the NHS has given me access to some of the best doctors in the world - that's not hyperbole, either. I've been epileptic since age 9 - around age 15 I had brain surgery at Great Ormond St. Children's Hospital - the surgeon told me they do about twelve of the type of operation he performed per year. Ultimately, I continued having fits but I recently saw that surgeon being interviewed on a TV documentary about the Human brain after he'd performed complex surgery on a newborn baby. These are the calibre of people employed by the NHS

Whatever's wrong with my genetics has also given me other (possibly, possibly not related) conditions - I have the doctors stumped, the folks at the National Hospital for Neurology & Neurosurgery are currently using cutting-edge techniques to analyse my mitochondrial DNA (from blood samples); the consultant jokingly told me not to tell anyone they were doing this because the research is so new (I'm still waiting on results). Wealthy Sheiks pay hundred's of thousands of pounds to get in to these hospitals as private patients (seriously, they take private patients in the very same Hospitals, with the same doctors!) - I get it through just paying my taxes. I don't think any realistic level of insurance in the USA would give me the care I've received on the NHS.

more than 3 years ago
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Man Robs Bank of $1 To Get Health Care In Jail

VJ42 Re:Sad, but I can see doing it too (950 comments)

You wouldn't have to.
For the same amount of money your government is already spending, you could have a universal health care system and still have private insurance available to anyone who who wishes it - that's the system here in the UK, and from looking at people quoting health insurance prices,it seems even our private health insurance is cheaper than yours...

more than 3 years ago
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Man Robs Bank of $1 To Get Health Care In Jail

VJ42 Re:Sad, but I can see doing it too (950 comments)

So again, where is this money going to come from?

The USA already spends more money per capita on health care than other western with universal coverage systems - no extra money is needed, just reallocation of existing funds; a quick google throws up this bar chart.

more than 3 years ago
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Man Robs Bank of $1 To Get Health Care In Jail

VJ42 Re:Sad, but I can see doing it too (950 comments)

WTF? I live in the UK, basic private health insurance is cheaper than that here even though almost no one buys it. ~£250/month is stupid money; are you paying for gold plated toilets or something?

The funniest thing about private vs public health care is that the same doctors work in both. When I was a kid, my dad had private health insurance through his job. The doctor that saw me and surgeon that removed my adenoids split their time between the private hospital that I was in, and the NHS Hospital that was literally over the road. The only benefit of the BUPA hospital was the luxurious hotel room instead of the ward I'd have been in in the NHS hospital - the doctors would have been exactly the same. Many senior doctors do this and a lot of private hospitals are built near NHS ones for this very reason.

more than 3 years ago
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Man Robs Bank of $1 To Get Health Care In Jail

VJ42 Re:Sad, but I can see doing it too (950 comments)

They would be obligated to get rid of the monarchy, though; the federal constitution requires that all states have a republican form of government, iirc.

Really? I always thought of her as the state governor...

more than 3 years ago
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ICANN Domain Expansion Could Increase Phishing

VJ42 Re:Trademarked Domains (142 comments)

No more than I will click on a link ending in .ly -- I have no idea of what it is, and I have no trust in the domain.

.ly is just the ccTLD for Libya, nothing particularly sinister about it any more than .us, .uk, .au, .ie, .nl, .de, .it, .in, .cn, and so on.

more than 3 years ago
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Nintendo Chief: Consumers Don't Understand 3DS Yet

VJ42 Re:It's the other way around (215 comments)

This. Personally, I'm waiting for the promised ability to transfer my DSiWare to the 3DS before buying one. I don't think I'm the only one doing that; and I know that other people have expressed other reasons for not getting one in other comments here. I'm afraid, the big N is in the wrong this time, not consumers.

more than 3 years ago
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Wal-Mart Tests Online Grocery Delivery

VJ42 Re:I object to delivery charges... (229 comments)

Domino's charges about half as much if you pick up the pizza yourself, yet still claims delivery is free...

Is this only if you go in the store? On their website, delivery and collection is the same price.

You get buy one get one free on collection, but not on delivery round here.

Strange. In the UK the delivery and collection is the same price, but you get buy one get one free on Tuesday. Weird.

I'm in the UK! Our local Dominoes seems to have a perpetual buy one get one free offer on (on collection); not just Tuesdays. It must be something they leave up to the individual Franchisees

more than 3 years ago
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Wal-Mart Tests Online Grocery Delivery

VJ42 Re:I object to delivery charges... (229 comments)

Domino's charges about half as much if you pick up the pizza yourself, yet still claims delivery is free...

Is this only if you go in the store? On their website, delivery and collection is the same price.

You get buy one get one free on collection, but not on delivery round here.

more than 3 years ago

Submissions

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The 2010 Election Manifesto of the Pirate Party UK

VJ42 VJ42 writes  |  more than 4 years ago

VJ42 (860241) writes "PRESS RELEASE

The 2010 Election Manifesto of the Pirate Party UK

The Pirate Party is a new type of political party.
A party that talks about issues the other parties ignore.
A party free from corruption and expenses scandals, free from lobbyists and party whips.
A party that is not left wing or right wing.
A party that admits it doesn't always have all the answers, and is willing to listen.
A party that wants to give you more rights not burden you with any more taxes.

Our manifesto covers 3 main areas: copyright and patent law; privacy law; and freedom of speech.

Copyright and Patents

Our copyright law is hopelessly out of date. The Pirate Party wants a fair and balanced copyright law that is suitable for the 21st century.
Copyright should give artists the right to be the only people making money from their work, but that needs to be balanced with 'fair use' rights for the public. We will legalise use of copyright works where no money changes hands, which will give the public new rights;

A new right to format shift (for example, buy a CD then copy it to an iPod — which is currently illegal);
A new right to time shift (record a TV programme for watching later) and
A new right to share files (which provides free advertising that is essential for less-well-known artists).
Counterfeiting, and profiting directly from other people's work without paying them, will remain illegal.

When copyright was first introduced, the government decided it should protect new works for 14 years. Ever since then, lobbyists have spent huge sums of money buying longer and longer extensions to copyright. Currently copyright carries on for more than 70 years after the author of a work dies. We want to speak up for the majority of people who believe that taking money from lobbyists in return for biased laws is wrong. We believe that in this fast moving world, 10 years of copyright protection is long enough. Shorter copyright will encourage artists to keep on creating new work, will allow new art forms (such as mash-ups) and will stop big businesses from constantly reselling content we have already paid for. Our 10 year copyright length will include a renewal after 5 years (allowing works that the creator is no longer interested in to fall into the public domain after 5 years). An exception will be made for software, where a 5 year term will apply to closed source software, and a 10 year term to open source, in recognition of the extra rights given to the public by open source licences. We will remove the loophole in copyright law that allows 'restarting the clock' by simply moving content to a new format, or making a small change to it.

We also recognise the need to warn the public about Digital Restrictions Management (DRM) technology. We believe the public needs to be protected from products that can be remotely turned off by the manufacturer, or products that 'phone home' and would therefore stop working if the manufacturer went bankrupt, or that are 'region coded'. We will therefore introduce a mandatory warning label on products that include DRM which will warn purchasers of the defects built into these products. We also pledge not to introduce any new blank media taxes.

We believe that patents exist to reward the inventors of truly outstanding ideas, not to allow big businesses to stifle competition with an ever-growing tide of trivial, incomprehensible, overreaching patents. We will stop the abuse of patent law by raising the bar on how innovative an idea has to be before it can be patented, and by prohibiting patents on software, business methods, concepts, colours and smells. We will require a working model to be provided to the patent office before a patent is granted, and we will strictly enforce the current rule that patents are invalid if they are "obvious to someone skilled in the art". We will allow more competition in the manufacturing of patented devices by introducing a system of compulsory patent licensing, and we will provide exemptions to patent law for non-commercial use, personal study and academic research.

Pharmaceutical patents are a major problem for the world. We need to strike a better balance between the need to pay for drug research, and the need to end the postcode lottery that UK citizens suffer when patented drugs are too expensive for the NHS. We need to tackle the problem of preventable deaths in the third world caused by high price of patented drugs. We will achieve this by abolishing drug patents, which will reduce drug costs drastically, since all drugs will become generic. This will save the NHS a massive amount of money, and part of that saving will be used to subsidise drug research. The pharmaceutical industry currently spends around 15% of its patent drug income on research; we will replace that with subsidies to the value of 20%, increasing research budgets, while still saving the NHS money. This policy of making all drugs generic will create a massive opportunity for industry to make profits, employ more people, and save lives by encouraging the manufacturing newly generic drugs in this country for sale to the third world.

Government copyrights are increasingly becoming a problem for society, with data such as maps and postcodes being jealously protected by government departments. We will introduce a new right of access to government funded data, requiring the release of all maps, statistics and so on that have been paid for by the taxpayer in open formats, under a Creative Commons or similar licence, giving the public access to research that they have already paid for. An exception will be made for cases that genuinely have national security or privacy concerns. This will include the output of the BBC, which is funded by the licence paying public and should therefore belong to the licence paying public. We will amend the BBC's charter to prevent the BBC from using DRM technology, and to require the BBC to release all their content under a Creative Commons licence. We pledge to maintain and expand the current list of important national events that cannot be exclusively broadcast pay TV services, and we pledge to put into action the government's existing but widely ignored Open Source Action Plan, which would encourage the use of free software in the public sector, saving money, and making the UK less reliant on foreign software suppliers.

Privacy

We believe privacy of the individual should be upheld at all times. We feel citizens should have the right to private and confidential communication; and therefore we will forbid third parties from intercepting or monitoring communication traffic (i.e. telephone calls, post, internet traffic, emails), and require specific warrants to be issued by a court before the police are allowed to monitor traffic. We will give the public a new right to encrypt their private data.

We strongly oppose compulsory ID cards, and pledge that we will never introduce them. The proposed National Identity Register will be regulated so that it can only contain trivial information, and data required by a particular government department must be held by that department only. We will introduce a new right to compensation for people affected by government data loss.

We will introduce stronger data protection laws, requiring companies that hold personal information to give consumers more information about their rights, to apply a reasonable level of security to data, and to be clear about their policies on data retention and amendment. We will introduce a new right to apply to a court for compensation where data protection laws have been broken. We will increase the penalties for any breaches of data protection laws, and we will allow the courts to apply these penalties to both the individuals and companies responsible.

We pledge a full review of the Regulation of Investigatory Powers Act (RIPA) 2000. We will introduce strong new laws prohibiting the abuse of RIPA powers, and introduce criminal liability for breaking them. We will insist that searches of personal property should only be done with reasonable suspicion of a serious, criminal offence, and that any non-trivial, targeted surveillance requires a warrant.

We will introduce laws on the acceptable use of CCTV. While we recognise the benefits of CCTV, it should not be considered a replacement for police officers on the beat, and it must not be used as an excuse for unrestricted spying on the public. We will introduce a public database, maintained by the Information Commissioner, listing the location and number of cameras, and the contact details for the relevant data controller, and we will ensure camera systems are visible to the people they are watching.

We want clearer guidelines and restrictions on the use of DNA records by authorities, to ensure samples are only be taken voluntarily or when there are reasonable grounds to suspect the individual of having committed a serious offence, to ensure they are promptly destroyed if the individual is acquitted or not charged with a criminal offence, to ensure samples are only held for the length of time where there is a reasonable suspicion that the suspect has committed a crime, and to ensure we follow European law on removal of DNA records.

We pledge increased government transparency and accountability. We will introduce a new right for constituents to force a by-election in the event of a loss of confidence in their MP. We will require minutes of all meetings of officials on government business to be accessible through freedom of information requests, that all international treaties be passed through the UK parliament as a standard bill, requiring the full approval of both houses, and that all available information that could be released through a freedom of information request should be made public by default.

We believe that MPs must be held to a higher standard of accountability than unelected citizens. To prevent abuses of their position, such as the redaction of expenses information, their right to privacy will be secondary to the public right to hold them to account for their actions.

Freedom of Speech

We believe that the Internet is instrumental to freedom of speech. We pledge to legislate in favour of net neutrality. We pledge that we will not allow government censorship of the internet for anything but the most extreme reasons (such as military secrets or images of child abuse).

We will solve the problem of false and misleading advertising of internet speeds by giving customers a new right to pay only for the fraction of the claimed broadband speed that the provider actually delivers, so if you sign up for an 8Mb/s connection and only receive 2Mb/s, you would only have to pay a quarter of the agreed price. We will ensure the provision of rural broadband by extending the current universal service provision requirement for telephones to include broadband access.

We will ensure that the UK has as a foreign policy objective the human right of freedom to communicate, and will encourage wider adoption of the encryption and anonymisation technologies that ensure this right.

We recognise the value of whistleblowers to society, and we will defend the right of citizens to expose illegal practices in the workplace and elsewhere, and we will introduce a new legal right to be a whistleblower that will ensure that exposing corrupt or illegal activities will take precedence over contract law and copyright law.

We believe the right to photograph events and buildings in public is important to prevent our society becoming a police state. We will enshrine in law a new right for photographers and filmmakers to go about their business without persecution under anti-terror laws.

We will encourage libraries and museums to digitise their content, and make it available online wherever possible. This applies especially to unique items (for example if a library has the only known copy of a book).

We want better computing education in schools. We will encourage the adoption of open source software in schools, so that children won't be reliant in the future on buying a particular software package from a particular company. Schools should emphasize understanding of computers, including programming for those pupils with an interest or aptitude for it, and they should provide lessons for pupils on the safe use of the internet.

We believe libel law should not be used to smother free speech. We pledge to reform libel law so it serves its intended purpose, by implementing the recommendations of the Libel Reform Campaign

We will promote the inclusion of accessibility features, subtitles, audio descriptions etc for the disabled, by clarifying the current legal position on accessibility with respect to broadcast material, websites, and material available on the internet, to as far as reasonably possible, make content accessible for disabled people, which is especially important in the public sector. We will also introduce a new right for disabled people to demand an unrestricted version of DRM protected content where that is necessary to allow them to access it.

In all other political matters, Pirate Party Candidates are encouraged to listen to their constituents, and make their own minds up, without the intervention of party whips, or political lobbyists."

Link to Original Source
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UK Law firm's piracy hunt condemned

VJ42 VJ42 writes  |  more than 4 years ago

VJ42 (860241) writes "Music industry representative the BPI has criticised the approach used by a UK law firm in chasing file-sharers.
Law firm ACS:Law has sent thousands of letters to people it claims have downloaded illegal content.
The BPI said it did not condone the approach of mass-mailing alleged internet pirates.
A law firm that represents some of those sent letters has called on the Information Commissioner to investigate the matter.
The BPI said it would not be adopting the same approach as ACS: Law if UK legislation on the issue of illegal file-sharing comes into force."

Link to Original Source
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Science ponders zombie attack

VJ42 VJ42 writes  |  more than 4 years ago

VJ42 (860241) writes "If zombies actually existed, an attack by them would lead to the collapse of civilisation unless dealt with quickly and aggressively. That is the conclusion of a mathematical exercise carried out by researchers in Canada.
But there is a serious side to the work. In some respects, a zombie "plague" resembles a lethal rapidly-spreading infection.
In their study, the researchers from the University of Ottawa and Carleton University posed a question: If there was to be a battle between zombies and the living, who would win?
The study has been welcomed by one of the world's leading disease specialists, Professor Neil Ferguson, who is one of the UK government's chief advisors on controlling the spread of swine flu. However he thinks that some of the assumptions made in the paper might be unduly alarmist. "My understanding of zombie biology is that if you manage to decapitate a zombie then it's dead forever. So perhaps they are being a little over-pessimistic when they conclude that zombies might take over a city in three or four days," he said."
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Phorm given warning

VJ42 VJ42 writes  |  more than 6 years ago

VJ42 (860241) writes "The BBC is reporting that the Information Commissioner's Office (ICO) has warned that Phorm should be opt-in and not opt-out; the ICO said European laws demand that users must consent to their traffic data being used for "value added services".
Before now Phorm has been expecting to operate on an "opt out" basis where every customer of ISPs that have signed up is enrolled unless they explicitly refuse to use it.

Responding to the ICO statement, Kent Ertugrul, chief executive of Phorm, said "We now have a statement from the Home Office and the Information Commissioner saying not only is there no privacy issue but there is no interception issue either."
He said that the warnings Phorm will give to those enrolled in it would "exceed substantially" the "valid and informed consent" demanded by European regulations.
"The more people understand what we are doing the more comfortable they get with it,"."

Link to Original Source
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VJ42 VJ42 writes  |  more than 7 years ago

VJ42 (860241) writes "An Apple iBook owner suspected his cat had hacked into his password-protected notebook. It turned out he was right — the system was missing a very old security patch, which meant his cat, which liked sleeping on his keyboard, managed to automatically bypass the computer's security.

Fortunately now he's patched his system the cat can only turn on the Caps Lock light; just goes to show, even Mac users should remember to update."
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VJ42 VJ42 writes  |  more than 7 years ago

VJ42 (860241) writes "I recently signed a online petition on software patents, but instead of dismissing it the UK government sent me a reply confirming it's position against software patents.

The Government remains committed to its policy that no patents should exist for inventions which make advances lying solely in the field of software. Although certain jurisdictions, such as the US, allow more liberal patenting of software-based inventions, these patents cannot be enforced in the UK.
They also remain committed to implementing the Gowers Review of Intellectual Property which means that

The Government will implement those recommendations for which it is responsible, and will therefore continue to exclude patents from areas where they may hinder innovation: including patents which are too broad, speculative, or obvious, or where the advance they make lies in an excluded area such as software.
After all the bad press they've had, this is a welcome bit of good news for us techies."
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VJ42 VJ42 writes  |  more than 7 years ago

VJ42 (860241) writes "This morning the new BBC trust reached provisional conclusions on BBC on-demand proposals. The headline is that they are giving the go ahead for on demand services, but buried further down in the document is this:

The Trust will require the BBC Executive to adopt a platform-agnostic approach within a reasonable timeframe. This requires the BBC to develop an alternative DRM framework to enable users of other technology, for example, Apple and Linux, to access the on-demand services.
The good news is that these proposals are still open for consultation. Take particular note of question 5

Question 5
How important is it that the proposed seven-day catch-up service over the internet is available to consumers who are not using Microsoft software?
If the Beeb don't develop a "Linux DRM" will they just not support Linux users at all, and if they do how long until it's cracked?"
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VJ42 VJ42 writes  |  more than 7 years ago

VJ42 (860241) writes "Sony Australia's Michael Ephraim has questioned the price point of rival next-gen hardware, stating the Wii is "a lot to fork out" for the intended family audience, while branding the Xbox 360 as "pricey". The comment was made whilst speaking to The Age newsapaper where he also discusses the 360 and late launch date of the PS3 in Europe and Australia.
"My only question for this Christmas on Wii is the price point. Even though it's affordable, at $400 plus whatever you need to buy accessories-wise, I'm guessing you need to spend about $500 to take home a Wii and enjoy it. I can't judge the product because I haven't played it but I've heard good things about it. For this Christmas, I think that price point is still not family entertainment because $500 is a lot to fork out"

If you look at what's happening in retail, 360 has done fairly well at launch but since then it has struggled to kick up a gear to the next level of sales. I think their product offering is still not broad enough.

How much will PS3's delay hurt Australian sales in the long term?
Talking to our retailers I would have to say none.
"
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VJ42 VJ42 writes  |  more than 7 years ago

VJ42 (860241) writes "Tesco, The UKs Biggest retailer has moved into the software market. Tesco has promised to release six packages, including office software, security systems and a photo editing tool.
Britain's biggest retailer said each title would cost less than £20, challenging what it described as the current "high" price of PC software.
Can they successfully move from groceries to challange Microsoft, Adobe and Symantec?
In related news Tesco has made £1.1bn profit in the last 6 months"

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