Beta
×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

Comments

top

Ask Slashdot: Corporate Open Source Policy?

Vellmont Waaaay too general. (57 comments)

Your question is far too generalized. You don't mention what your product is, what your firm does, or what the risks you're trying to protect from. Nobody can give you any meaninful advice unless you provide real details. What is it you're afraid of exposing? What's the IP you're afraid of diluting? Is your company a 100 person shop, or a 10,000 person shop? It matters.

Those risks may be illusory, depending on what this code is. I've had a few project I'd like to release as OSS, but there's zero IP dilution and zero risk of exposing anything. Despite what people tend to think, code isn't a commodity. The specifics matter quite a bit. The only answers you're going to get with the information you provided are very generalized useless ones.

about a week ago
top

Oracle Hasn't Killed Java -- But There's Still Time

Vellmont Re:C is replaced (371 comments)

C has been replaced with C++, C# and Java.

In some cases, yes. But that doesn't mean C is dead or dying. It's just not as dominant as it once was. Languages are like living things, they compete with other languages for space. There's still a TON of applications written in C. The linux kernel is a major example. C isn't as dominant as it once was, but that's a natural development of diversity. Greater diversity doesn't mean the death of what was once dominant, only that what was once dominant fills a smaller niche.

about two weeks ago
top

Oracle Hasn't Killed Java -- But There's Still Time

Vellmont Re:Oh noes! (371 comments)

You just listed 3 buzzwords. None of them are "big ideas", they're vague concepts, of which a subset of the vague concepts are good ideas.

Java is a programming language. Can you expound on what exactly Java is missing to embrace whatever it is you think is good about them?

about two weeks ago
top

Oracle Hasn't Killed Java -- But There's Still Time

Vellmont Re:Oh noes! (371 comments)


Java is becoming the new COBOL.

I'd like to be the first to say... huh? I'm sure Java will become a legacy language some day, but hipsters don't really define much of anything. Hipsters are against anything that's popular (because popularity by definition isn't hip), and go for the obscure things. That's why PBR became popular. It's not good, but among the younger set microbrews are very popular, so a hipster has to go for something unpopular to distinguish themselves from what's popular.

20 years ago people used to say that about C. C is dying, C is going to be replaced, etc, etc. Didn't happen. By popularity C has a lot more competition, but it's alive and well and not going away. People hate COBOL because it was a badly designed language. If anything is the new COBOL, it's PHP. I've known several PHP programmers, and many of them have switched to another language not because of a lack of jobs, but because they hate the language. I'm not old enough to have been around for the COBOL era, but I'd guess it was the same then.

The death of a language starts when developers leave it in droves for something else. I don't see that happeneing for Java. Do you?

about two weeks ago
top

Ask Slashdot: What To Do About the Sorry State of FOSS Documentation?

Vellmont Re:Terrible coding standards (430 comments)

Sure, you're probbably right that documenting skills and coding skills are mostly orthogonal to one another. But my point is more that the documenting at the very end is the wrong approach. Producing documentation should be integral into the process, not an afterthought. That doesn't mean it has to be done by the same person, only that it's not the last thing you do, and has to be overcome with people feeling like they're asking "dumb questions"

about two weeks ago
top

Ask Slashdot: "Real" Computer Scientists vs. Modern Curriculum?

Vellmont Narrow scope. (637 comments)

The programmer you're referring to has a very narrow scope. Software development is big, and we don't all have the same problems. People are often very narrow in their view of the world, and assume THEIR view of the world and their problems are the only one that exists. Thus the C programmer who thinks that Java programmers are inferrior because they don't have to deal with memory management. (i.e. you don't feel our pain, so you're not one of us).

I can equally tell you that C programmers don't understand OO principles. If you don't do OO, that's fine. Just like if you don't need to deal with all the memory management issues, that's fine too.

Your programmer is just doing the same cultural bullshit that's been going on for decades "These kids these days aren't any good because they have/didn't-have BLAH-1. Back in MY day we had BLAH-2". 40 years ago (and outside of the software world) it was that doggone rock music.... "back in my day we appreciated Henry Miller, not these blasted Beatles and their long hair!"

People become attached to their view of the world and can't imagine it without it. This is the pitfall of age and experience.

about two weeks ago
top

PayPal's Two-Factor Authentication Can Be Bypassed Using eBay Bug

Vellmont Bug bounty isn't enough. (33 comments)

The article says he won' be eligible for $2500-$3000. It's hardly worth it. Getting worldwide attention, and a good reputation for finding a major security vulnerability in a major website is worth a LOT more than $3000, especially when you've waited 60 days after disclosing it.

I'd say the bounty should be about 10x for major problems like this that are easily reproducible, and have a high impact.

about two weeks ago
top

Ask Slashdot: What To Do About the Sorry State of FOSS Documentation?

Vellmont Re:Terrible coding standards (430 comments)

Coders are too busy writing code and making changes to what they write to give time for accurate documentation to be written....
  In the age of using github as a distribution and code changes between today and tomorrow, the documentation is suddenly invalid before it's written. Even then, it requires a lot of stupid questions asked by the documentation staff to coders who think they have better things to do.

You've just described an extremely flawed development model. For some reason you can still get away with this with documentation since it's still thought of as not all that important and can be done last. People used to think of security in the same way (and some people still do this), but 20 years of people saying you have to bake security in at the start has resulted in nobody seriously considering doing that as a last step. But yet we still think of documentation this way, by and large.

The point being, if you want documentation, it needs to be part of the process, and part of the job. If a developer changes a major part of how people interact with the software, everyone in the project should know about that and it shouldn't just be this big surprise at the end.

about three weeks ago
top

Nasty Business: How To Drain Competitors' Google AdWords Budgets

Vellmont Re:Advertised on YouTube? (97 comments)

I think what you've discovered is that you can't put up ads for something similar to what people are searching for, thinking they'll consider buying your product instead. Searching for somethng is a very narrow task. "Is THAT what I want?... no. Is THAAAT what I want?". It's not really a time when people are open to new ideas.

So I don't think Google adswords is a "scam". If it was, Google would have been out of business long ago. What you need to realize about marketing is you need to get the consumer at the right TIME. There's periods of time when people are far more open to something new and interesting. But it's most certainly not when they're looking for something specific.

about three weeks ago
top

Nasty Business: How To Drain Competitors' Google AdWords Budgets

Vellmont Re:Do It Yourself (97 comments)

Shit, if people actually DO that, I'd put out ads specifically so competitors would go try to click on them. Why? Because every minute they spend clicking on ads is a minute they aren't doing any work trying to compete with me.

about three weeks ago
top

Nasty Business: How To Drain Competitors' Google AdWords Budgets

Vellmont Re:Hm (97 comments)

1) This service will survive for all of two weeks tops - it's him against the collective power of Google. I put my money on Google.

And if that were the matchup, I'd agree. But remember Google is an enormous company, with many problems. This is a minor little annoying fly buzzing around the office. If the fly lies low, it can survive for quite a while. If it bites the wrong person, or becomes too annoying, it's going to get swatted rather quickly.

So far it looks like the fly has managed to lie low enough to not be much of a concern (The article mentions the service has been around for 2 1/2 years).

about three weeks ago
top

Linus Torvalds: "GCC 4.9.0 Seems To Be Terminally Broken"

Vellmont Re:I know you're trying to be funny, but... (739 comments)

>("Getting the job done" does not, and has never required being abusive to others. Getting the job done while being abusive is not proof that being abusive is required or even was part of, "getting the job done.")

Hmmm.. I'm going to disagree here. Being verbally abusive is a technique to demand change in an organization. We all like to think leaders all command respect and everyone just follows them because they're the leader. Bullshit. One technique, employed by MANY leaders is being a total fucking asshole, at least part of the time. You think anyone would be talking about this GCC bullshit (and if what Torvalds says is right, it's really completely fucked up, and not excusable) if Linus just put a nice, politely worded request to just fix shit? I don't think so. But even if he was nice and polite, and got the thing fixed, there's little or no consequence for the fuckup, so it can happen again. If you're coding GCC, maybe you might at least sub-consciously think "boy, I better not release utter shit, or I'll catch some serious shit from that asshole Linus Torvalds... what a cock gobbling asshole that Torvalds is".

This idea you have that everything can work in a nice polite society where everyone has mutual respect for each other can work sometimes, in limited capacities. But the norm is for assholes like Linus to sometimes throw shit-fits, and others to work in fear of having a shit-fit thrown at them sometimes.

Is that the ONLY way to run an organization? Probably not, but as another thread points out, it's a common pattern of effective leaders.

about three weeks ago
top

The Daily Harassment of Women In the Game Industry

Vellmont Re:Pft (962 comments)

The post was about comparing a woman looking at a mans strength, to a man looking at a linebackers strength. It wasn't about men being stronger than women, which is obvious.

The claim, at least as someone else could find out, was totally false. So yes, I think scrutinizing peoples claims is extremely important.

about a month ago
top

The Daily Harassment of Women In the Game Industry

Vellmont Re:Pft (962 comments)

Can you please post those stats, and a source? When people make claims like this, it's important to back them up and they be scrutinized.

And if you're reply is "look them up yourself", well, I'm not the one making the claim. It's your responsibility to provide evidence.

about a month ago
top

Ask Slashdot: Linux Login and Resource Management In a Computer Lab?

Vellmont Re:Technical solution to a social problem. (98 comments)

Ha. You make me laugh. People such as yourself have bad memories, or lived in some kind of sheltered environment. Every generation is convinced that the generation after them are the spawn of satan, and when THEY were that age they were all just perfect angels, or at the very least a HELL of a lot better than the current lot of miscreants. The attitude you're projecting has been common for at least the last 60 years.

Uhh.. when _I_ was that age about 20 years ago people were hacking into the computer science workstations, sniffing passwords, hacking root, running a bazillion processes on the box, etc. The only thing that's changed is now it's Linux machines, not SunOS machines.

about a month ago
top

Ask Slashdot: Linux Login and Resource Management In a Computer Lab?

Vellmont Technical solution to a social problem. (98 comments)

If your users can't play nice together, the solution isn't to treat the place like a prison with automated systems enforcing a hard and fast set of rules.

The solution is for users to create their own enforcement. If some guy tries to take all the resources across your network with distcc, then the people affected should be able to notice that and tell the guy to knock that the fuck off.

In other words, give the users the freedom to break stuff, but also the knowledge to find out who'd breaking their stuff. It'll serve them far better than creating a walled garden where someone else has the responsibility to enforce social rules.

Slashdot and reddit work this way. Neither go around trying to enforce how people behave, they give the users the power to do that themself.

about a month ago
top

Selectively Reusing Bad Passwords Is Not a Bad Idea, Researchers Say

Vellmont Re:This makes sense. (280 comments)


Many of them, however, have to follow outdated and impractical guides forced upon them by government standards in order to comply with HIPA, SOX, or PCI.

Don't blame the goverment for that. SOX doesn't specify passwords, it's an accounting standard that leaves that to the accounting industry. PCI is a credit card processing standard, and isn't set by the goverment.

Your instincts are simply incorrect. You think bad standards==government. Pure BS. Bad standards are bad standards and they're set all the time by large organizations. Much of what you're complaining about are bad standards set by accountants who really have no business setting these standards. It's the IT industry that needs to push on these people to change.

about a month ago
top

Ask Slashdot: Unattended Maintenance Windows?

Vellmont Re:Murphy says no. (265 comments)

I don't believe I mentioned the number of people, merely that upgrading when nobody was using the system creates another risk that you won't know about till much later.

People in IT seem to want the "perfect" solution, which doesn't exist, or at the very least a black/white kind of thinking. Everything is tradeoffs and it's important to understand what those tradeoffs are. I've also seen people seem to think all situations and organizations are the same. (Obviously very, very wrong).

But I will say this. In some cases the best solution might be to upgrade the system when people are still using it that it can be switched back quickly.

about a month ago
top

Ask Slashdot: Unattended Maintenance Windows?

Vellmont Re:Murphy says no. (265 comments)


  say the patch unexpectedly breaks another critical function of the server. It happens, if you have been in IT any time you have seen it happen

Yes, this happens all the time. And really it's a case for doing the upgrade when people are actually using the system. If the patch happens at 2am (chosen because nobody is using it at 2am), nobody is going to notice it until the morning. The morning, when the guy who put in the patch is still trying to recover from having to work at 2am. At the very least groggy, and not performing at his/her best.

about a month and a half ago
top

Avast Buys 20 Used Phones, Recovers 40,000 Deleted Photos

Vellmont Re:Can't we just say people took naked pics? (231 comments)


All those erase cycles would wear out the flash memory much faster.

The wear limits, and wear leveling on flash memory are such that even with heavy usage you'd still outlive the lifetime of the phone by an order of magnitude at least. (on the order of 1,000,000 erases). A phone is never even going to approach heavy usage. So I reject the idea that we can't erase because it'll wear out the flash memory prematurely.

about a month and a half ago

Submissions

top

Vellmont Vellmont writes  |  more than 7 years ago

Vellmont (569020) writes "I live in an apartment, and I've recently become enamored with the idea of turning my Linux server into a burglar alarm. The goal would be to provide the same features of a professional burglar alarm (motion detection, keypad de-activation and activation, and a loud alarm) plus some extra features that's easy for an internet connected computer such as paging alerts. Has anyone found hardware that can be fairly easily interfaced with Linux, as well as an open-source project that drives the alarm?"
top

Vellmont Vellmont writes  |  more than 7 years ago

Vellmont (569020) writes "Xname.org, a popular provider of free DNS hosting has been taken offline do to a distributed denial of service attack. Their website now reads:
XName is temporarily closed since 08:00PM CEST yesterday evening. We were experiencing the largest DDoS we ever had on both ns0 and ns1 IP addresses, forcing our upstream providers to cut off XName servers in order to preserve their other customers. We're working hard in order to have at least one DNS server answering ASAP, and we already negociated with a premium transit provider to host one of our DNS servers shortly.
Anyone relying soley on Xname.org for DNS hosting should probbably change their domain records to point elsewhere."

Journals

Vellmont has no journal entries.

Slashdot Login

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?

Submission Text Formatting Tips

We support a small subset of HTML, namely these tags:

  • b
  • i
  • p
  • br
  • a
  • ol
  • ul
  • li
  • dl
  • dt
  • dd
  • em
  • strong
  • tt
  • blockquote
  • div
  • quote
  • ecode

"ecode" can be used for code snippets, for example:

<ecode>    while(1) { do_something(); } </ecode>