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Torvalds: I Made Community-Building Mistakes With Linux

Vellmont Re:Why is shitload spelled sh*#load? (387 comments)

So the rest of us have to be censored because a small minority read at a library, or have infantile filtering software at work? If you, your employer, your school, or your nanny want to do that, fine. But if major sites started using real lanaugage that people use, there'd be more pressure on the infantile filtering software to allow people to view sites that use "forbidden words".

Also, there's other methods to fool the filtering software. That's even a better option. Turn it into a cat/mouse game, which would increase the costs for the filter writers.

3 days ago
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Torvalds: I Made Community-Building Mistakes With Linux

Vellmont Re:Bitch-ass whiners got their feelings hurt (387 comments)

Would Apple be where it is if Jobs wasn't an asshole?

Do you think Linux would still be a success if Linus wasn't there to keep dumbasses from accumulating more political clout than technical competence and steering it toward ruin?

Being a fuckhead like Jobs or Torvalds is ONE way of enforcing order. But it's not the only way. It's probbably the most obvious and easy though. But no, I don't agree that Jobs and Torvalds have to be shitheads for Apple and Linux to succeed.

4 days ago
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Torvalds: I Made Community-Building Mistakes With Linux

Vellmont Why is shitload spelled sh*#load? (387 comments)

We all know the word is shitload. We all know Linus is swearing, and he didn't bleep himself. This is an adult website, not a child website. So can we please have an honest depiction of what's actually said rather than some silly characters replacing the full spelling of the word like this is a cartoon? FCC rules don't apply to slashdot, that's radio and TV.

I'll never understand this weird deception people have that if you miss-spell fuck as f*ck, shit as sh-T, cocksucker as c*cksu**er, piss as p*ss, motherfucker as motherf*cker, cunt as c*nt, and tits as t*ts, you're someone "not swearing". Uhh.. yeah. (My regards to the late George Carlin)

4 days ago
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Google Finds Vulnerability In SSL 3.0 Web Encryption

Vellmont Re:How legacy is legacy? (68 comments)

Yes, it's possible for IE6 to use TLS 1.0. But it's not enabled by default. Since it's not on by default, it'll essentially be broken when users visit a site with SSL 3 disabled.

I don't have an old IE6 machine to check myself, but I've found several references that say it's not on.

https://news.ycombinator.com/i...

5 days ago
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Google Finds Vulnerability In SSL 3.0 Web Encryption

Vellmont Re:How legacy is legacy? (68 comments)

I think you missed my point. The point was about the implications of removing SSL3 from the server side. Many times you can't just simply change something on a webserver to fix one browser without breaking another.

In this case, the effects seem to be minimal, and would only break IE6. That's not a problem in 2014, but would have been a major problem if this was discovered in 2007.

5 days ago
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Google Finds Vulnerability In SSL 3.0 Web Encryption

Vellmont How legacy is legacy? (68 comments)

The last major browser that doesn't support TLS 1 was IE6. Even Microsoft doesn't support that piece of crap anymore. I'm sure there's some special cases of embedded systems out there that rely on SSL3 only, but that's a small minority.

So the question to me is, what would break if you disabled SSL3? Breaking the web for IE6 users happened a long, long time ago.

about a week ago
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Fighting the Culture of 'Worse Is Better'

Vellmont Re:Simple != worse (240 comments)

I don't know who to credit for this
.
.
.
If, therefore, I write code as clever as I possibly can - I can't effectively debug it

Based on your quote, probably (originally) Don Knuth.

“Debugging is twice as hard as writing the code in the first place. Therefore, if you write the code as cleverly as possible, you are, by definition, not smart enough to debug it.” -Don Knuth.

about a week ago
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Password Security: Why the Horse Battery Staple Is Not Correct

Vellmont Re:Every time XKCD 936 is Mentioned (546 comments)


  What theory does he reject? It's simple math that shows that Munroe's method is better for creating stronger passwords (at least for the average user)

The theory he rejects is the hidden assumption that people will actually pick random words. You've also missed that hidden assumption, and focused on the math. I tend to agree with the security researcher above that the assumption is wrong, and people won't pick random words for passwords.

Most people have a bank account and an ATM card. The ATM card has only a 4 digit pin on it. That's only 10,000 possibilities, or about 13 bits of entropy. Since most people choose dates (birthdays, anniversaries), there's really only about 400 possibilities for the average person. But yet you don't hear about mass amount of fraud when people are robbed from ATMs. Why? Because to withdraw the money, you need two things in your posession. The card, and the pin. If you get the card, you also get a small number of tries on the card before it's locked. Even at 1/400 per try it's unlikely you'll be robbed with 3 guesses.

  The larger problem is that "security people" tend to think entirely different than most everyone else, and just assume people act like them. They don't, and no amount of education or pleading will change that. So if you want real security on the web, it's time to ditch passwords as the sole means of authenticating people. You can't change human nature, and that's the root of the problem.

about a week ago
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Texas Health Worker Tests Positive For Ebola

Vellmont Re:Robots? (419 comments)


  Ebola is actually no worse than AIDS, from what I can tell from a quick search. So long as there's no bodily fluid contact, you're fine.

I agree with everything else you're saying, but this is absolutely false. AIDS is VERY difficult to get. You won't get AIDS from casual contact with saliva, urine, sputum, or feces. Ebola can be contracted by any of these coming in contact with your eye.

So they're worlds apart in terms of how transmissible each is.

about a week ago
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Ask Slashdot: Best Books On the Life and Work of Nikola Tesla?

Vellmont Why Edison is a household name and Tesla is a band (140 comments)

Other people talk about the self-promotional nature of Edison, and how Tesla wasn't as interested in that. That's true, and that's a piece of the answer. But there's another more basic difference in what they invented. Edison invented end products that people came into contact with every day, like the electric light or the phonograph. Tesla invented the infra-structure necessary for modern life like AC power generation, and the AC motor. Those are hugely important, but the average person doesn't come into contact with them directly, only the effect of it.

So it's much easier for the average person to see what Edison did for them, but harder for them to see what Tesla did for them. It shouldn't be any wonder that Tesla isn't well known.

about a week ago
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Where Intel Processors Fail At Math (Again)

Vellmont Re:Exact mathematical value isn't the ideal (238 comments)

Hello,

As a maths grad working with computers, you probably have to rely on documentation for any tool you're using, right? The article is claiming the documentation is inaccurate. If we can't rely on the documentation to be accurate, what can we rely on? Maple, Matlab, and Mathematica ALSO rely on the documentation being accurate. If they told you one precision, and you got another, might you not complain, and want that information widely spread so they're more apt to fix it?

Also, I've noticed that Math people seem to have a bias for perfect answers. That's rarely, if ever the case in science. Science is often "good enough", not perfect. If the processor gives a "good enough" answer for what you're trying to calculate, then so be it. Not everyone needs the exact answer as you might need in mathematics.

about two weeks ago
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FBI Says It Will Hire No One Who Lies About Illegal Downloading

Vellmont Re:not even wrong (576 comments)

Apparently you don't understand what I'm saying if you're talking about copyright law. I never actually mentioned that. But alas, all you can do is redirect to something you can win on.

about two weeks ago
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FBI Says It Will Hire No One Who Lies About Illegal Downloading

Vellmont Re:the right to copy (576 comments)

I see Ray. Interesting that you can't respond to my argument and have to resort to critiquing a spelling error.

about two weeks ago
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Kmart Says Its Payment System Was Hacked

Vellmont Re:social security? wtf (101 comments)

Most stores these days have their own store credit cards. To apply for them you give them your SS#.

about two weeks ago
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FBI Says It Will Hire No One Who Lies About Illegal Downloading

Vellmont Ironic. (576 comments)

The FBI doesn't want its agents to lie, or default on student loans (the latter is often simply a matter of economics, not honesty), but yet the Snowden documents reveal that the FBI commits perjury in federal court to hide the true, illegal sources of information they got from the NSA. Described here, http://www.alexaobrien.com/sec... Search for "Parallel Construction"

about two weeks ago
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FBI Says It Will Hire No One Who Lies About Illegal Downloading

Vellmont Re:yes, they people who follow the law/ rules (576 comments)

. The rule that what I create with my own hands os mine to give away, trade, or sell exists for a very good reason.

And what's that reason? Not everyone agrees about imaginary property Ray. The concept is rather new. You're free to disagree, but the world is changing and as information is so easy to copy fewer and fewer people are seeing things your way. I don't really know anyone that really thinks you're a criminal if you share a TV show with your friend for instance. TV is already valued at approximately $0, since it's been free for so long. You seem to have an attitude that laws and cultural values are set in stone rather than the amorphous and variable concepts that they actually are.

These sorts of laws are cultural ones, and the culture is changing. It's not exactly clear what's going to happen with copy written property, but a good many people don't see it your way. That tends to change laws. 30 years ago it was unimaginable that marijuana and gay marriage would become legal, but the culture changed and now it's inevitable they'll both be legal in all 50 states. Are you prepared if copy write laws are reformed in another 30 years?

about two weeks ago
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Details of iOS and Android Device Encryption

Vellmont Re:If you can't crack the password, then don't. (146 comments)

They might not use an NSL, but I wouldn't count on it. The other blunt instrument the government has at it's disposal is the
Authorized use of Military force, which doesn't even mention surveilance or data and is about military force, but which the government has cited in its warrantless wiretapping when sued by the http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/A...">ACLU. Kind of a stretch, but the government has long tried to get away with whatever they want and let the courts rule on it later.

So I have no problem beliving the US goverment wouldn't try some crazy interpretation of a statute never inteded to give them the power to do that, but which they'd hope the courts would take years to rule on.

about two weeks ago
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Details of iOS and Android Device Encryption

Vellmont If you can't crack the password, then don't. (146 comments)

Presumably, the apps on the phone have access to the encrypted data on the phone, right? So there's a simple solution. The user is happily using their iWhatever. The government sends a Nation Security letter to Apple forcing them to put a backdoor into the phone of the target, such that this app can read whatever data it wants on the phone. So when the user boots up his/her phone, and enters the password, the rougue app should be able to read all the data on the phone.

Can anyone tell me why this WOULDN'T work?

about two weeks ago
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Lennart Poettering: Open Source Community "Quite a Sick Place To Be In"

Vellmont Re:Systemd (993 comments)


Their old trading platform TradElect was based on Microsoft's .NET Framework, and was developed by Microsoft and Accenture

You missed the real problem. The last word in that sentence. Accenture. I don't love Microsoft, but I don't think they're the big problem here. Accenture is a WELL KNOWN bad company that produces shit. They make Microsoft look good. Everyone I've ever know that's worked with them has a bad story to report. The same isn't true of Microsoft. So don't blame MS for the failures of a shitty outsourcing firm.

about two weeks ago
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Lennart Poettering: Open Source Community "Quite a Sick Place To Be In"

Vellmont Re:Systemd (993 comments)


Are you aware that you're helping to reinforce one of the points two comments up?

I don't agree. Being critical of his work on a technical basis is VERY different from personal attacks. I found poettering's post to be good, and I agreed with that he has to say. I've also had shitty problems with the sound on Linux before, which I _think_ might be attributable to pulseaudio. I can't be sure, but I have no trouble beliving pulseaudio might be shit. I don't take a stand on systemd yet, but my instincts are that it's the wrong approach. But I'd never get personal with the man, after all, it's just software.

And somehow, writing software that a group of people deem as bad means that you should be met with horrible physical tortures?

Umm.. what? Where did that come from? Nobody suggested physical violence. Nobody even got personal. Please stick to what people actually said rather than pulling stuff out of nowhere.

about two weeks ago

Submissions

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Vellmont Vellmont writes  |  more than 7 years ago

Vellmont (569020) writes "I live in an apartment, and I've recently become enamored with the idea of turning my Linux server into a burglar alarm. The goal would be to provide the same features of a professional burglar alarm (motion detection, keypad de-activation and activation, and a loud alarm) plus some extra features that's easy for an internet connected computer such as paging alerts. Has anyone found hardware that can be fairly easily interfaced with Linux, as well as an open-source project that drives the alarm?"
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Vellmont Vellmont writes  |  more than 7 years ago

Vellmont (569020) writes "Xname.org, a popular provider of free DNS hosting has been taken offline do to a distributed denial of service attack. Their website now reads:
XName is temporarily closed since 08:00PM CEST yesterday evening. We were experiencing the largest DDoS we ever had on both ns0 and ns1 IP addresses, forcing our upstream providers to cut off XName servers in order to preserve their other customers. We're working hard in order to have at least one DNS server answering ASAP, and we already negociated with a premium transit provider to host one of our DNS servers shortly.
Anyone relying soley on Xname.org for DNS hosting should probbably change their domain records to point elsewhere."

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