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Britain's GCHQ Attacked Anonymous Supporters With DDoS

Walterk Robert Peel called.. (133 comments)

and he mentioned something about ethics of policing*.

  1. To prevent crime and disorder, as an alternative to their repression by military force and severity of legal punishment.
  2. To recognise always that the power of the police to fulfil their functions and duties is dependent on public approval of their existence, actions and behaviour and on their ability to secure and maintain public respect.
  3. To recognise always that to secure and maintain the respect and approval of the public means also the securing of the willing co-operation of the public in the task of securing observance of laws.
  4. To recognise always that the extent to which the co-operation of the public can be secured diminishes proportionately the necessity of the use of physical force and compulsion for achieving police objectives.
  5. To seek and preserve public favour, not by pandering to public opinion; but by constantly demonstrating absolutely impartial service to law, in complete independence of policy, and without regard to the justice or injustice of the substance of individual laws, by ready offering of individual service and friendship to all members of the public without regard to their wealth or social standing, by ready exercise of courtesy and friendly good humour; and by ready offering of individual sacrifice in protecting and preserving life.
  6. To use physical force only when the exercise of persuasion, advice and warning is found to be insufficient to obtain public co-operation to an extent necessary to secure observance of law or to restore order, and to use only the minimum degree of physical force which is necessary on any particular occasion for achieving a police objective.
  7. To maintain at all times a relationship with the public that gives reality to the historic tradition that the police are the public and that the public are the police, the police being only members of the public who are paid to give full time attention to duties which are incumbent on every citizen in the interests of community welfare and existence.
  8. To recognise always the need for strict adherence to police-executive functions, and to refrain from even seeming to usurp the powers of the judiciary of avenging individuals or the State, and of authoritatively judging guilt and punishing the guilty.
  9. To recognise always that the test of police efficiency is the absence of crime and disorder, and not the visible evidence of police action in dealing with them.

*: I did try and warn him about the future but he said he had to rush off to do some shopping..

about 6 months ago
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Adobe's New Ebook DRM Will Leave Existing Users Out In the Cold Come July

Walterk Re:*Shrug* (304 comments)

It would be useful if there was a list of retailers that sell these DRM books, so they can go on my boycott list.

about 6 months ago
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EU Commission: Corruption Across EU Costs €120 Billion

Walterk Re:"probably" much higher? (196 comments)

It seems fairly easy to figure that out. Take the total health expenditure per capita, which for the US according to the OECD was $8508. The second in the list is Norway, with $5669. Norway isn't exactly an ill country, so that leaves $2839 per head (33.38%) unaccounted for.

If you'd compare it to a purely tax sponsored public system like Britain's NHS, that takes 3405 per capita, which would leave $5103 (or 60%) unaccounted for, somehow soaked up by the insurance industry.

Enjoy your free market!

about 6 months ago
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Fighting the Flu May Hurt Those Around You

Walterk Eschew drugs (351 comments)

As much as I like the occasional aspirin or paracetamol, when I have a cold or similar, I try to make a concious effort to raise my body temperature as much as possible to aid in the virus fighting efforts of my body. Seems to work well whenever I do it, even if it is uncomfortable at times. I try to use drugs only as a last resort.

On the other hand, if the weather gets hot, I've been known to pop an aspirin purely to lower my body temperature so I can be somewhat useful and cope.

about 6 months ago
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Africa, Clooney, and an Unlikely Space Race

Walterk Re:Wow, really? (137 comments)

My theory is that it's whooshes all the way down.

about 8 months ago
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Twitter Will Track Your Browsing To Sell Ads

Walterk Re:How does one prevent this ? (120 comments)

Use a third party application (while you can). They don't have the promoted tweets and the like. For Android I recommend TweetLanes

about 8 months ago
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Obama Praises NSA But Promises To Rein It In

Walterk Re:Thanks, dude (306 comments)

I did as otherwise my actions would have little consequences. :)

about 8 months ago
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Study: People Are Biased Against Creative Thinking

Walterk Re:Creativity often equates to "Different" (377 comments)

Replying instead of moderating..

Things like the medieval opinion that the world is flat

They never did think that, it's a modern invention, introduced as late as 1828 after Washington Irving's publication of A History of the Life and Voyages of Christopher Columbus. The ancient Greeks could show that the Earth was round already. In fact, if in the medieval ages they thought that the Earth was flat, why would Columbus (and his contemporaries) even bother sailing west in order to reach India?

You have some points but please do not perpetuate this myth.

about 8 months ago
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Obama Praises NSA But Promises To Rein It In

Walterk Taking action (306 comments)

As a European, I did the one thing I could do, cancel the server I was renting in the US. Sorry to the very nice people who ran it but your government left me with no choice.

about 8 months ago
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Is the Porsche Carrera GT Too Dangerous?

Walterk Re:Speed? (961 comments)

It's not the speed that kills, it's coming to a sudden stop against those trees.

about 8 months ago
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Google and Microsoft To Block Child-Abuse Search Terms

Walterk Re:Statistics (308 comments)

You are right, it doesn't. But it that relevant? There is a 90% chance that the child being abused knows it's victim. So why is everybody seemingly going after the 10% stranger danger?

For that 90%, it is debatable whether having accessibility to child pornography has any effect has any impact as they have direct access to the child. What do you think would attract a paedophile to a child? Pictures of a child or being in the presence of a child?

about 8 months ago
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Google and Microsoft To Block Child-Abuse Search Terms

Walterk Statistics (308 comments)

This is likely to be hugely ineffectual, as the actual numbers point to a rather different typical abuser:

In the United States, approximately 15% to 25% of women and 5% to 15% of men were sexually abused when they were children.[33][34][35][36][37] Most sexual abuse offenders are acquainted with their victims; approximately 30% are relatives of the child, most often brothers, fathers, mothers, uncles or cousins; around 60% are other acquaintances such as friends of the family, babysitters, or neighbours; strangers are the offenders in approximately 10% of child sexual abuse cases.[33] In over one-third of cases, the perpetrator is also a minor.[38]

From: Wikipedia

So what is this actually supposed to accomplish apart from censorship? What sort of "unsavoury" things are in this list of 100k search terms that are not even illegal? Snowden perhaps?

about 8 months ago
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Nokia Design Guru Urges Apple To End Cable Chaos

Walterk Re:Obligatory xkcd (791 comments)

xkcd 301

about 9 months ago
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Former Microsoft Privacy Chief Doesn't Trust Company, Uses Open Source Software

Walterk Re:Message received (199 comments)

Sounds like the Congress could use something like Parliamentary privilege principle:

it allows members of the House of Lords and House of Commons to speak freely during ordinary parliamentary proceedings without fear of legal action on the grounds of slander, contempt of court or breaching the Official Secrets Act.[1][2] It also means that members of Parliament cannot be arrested on civil matters for statements made or acts undertaken as an MP within the grounds of the Palace of Westminster, on the condition that such statements or acts occur as part of a proceeding in Parliamentâ"for example, as a question to the Prime Minister in the House of Commons. This allows Members to raise questions or debate issues which could slander an individual, interfere with an ongoing court case or threaten to reveal state secrets

about 10 months ago
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UK Cryptographers Call For UK and US To Out Weakened Products

Walterk Re:Likely outcome (105 comments)

Interesting you raise the point about the "mandate to spy on as much as possible on the off chance that it may prevent some terrorist act".

There is a very interesting article on the BBC blogs indicating just how useless MI5 has been at any sort of intelligence gathering, even the sort that's been painfully obvious over it's entire existence. It's opening gambit: "Maybe the real state secret is that spies aren't very good at their jobs and don't know very much about the world".

http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/adamcurtis/posts/BUGGER

about 10 months ago
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Nokia Insider On Why It Failed and Why Apple Could Be Next

Walterk Re:Innovation? (420 comments)

This. The Nokias I've owned before have all been great pieces of hardware. It's likely that if they launched an Android phone it would sell well. In fact, if they only put Android on one of their Lumia 925s, I'd be very tempted to ditch my Nexus 4.

about a year ago

Submissions

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Assange granted asylum in Equador

Walterk Walterk writes  |  about 2 years ago

Walterk writes "Following the threats made by the Home Office to revoke the Equadorian embassy it's sovereign status in order to arrest Julian Assange, Equador has decided to grant him asylum."
Link to Original Source

Journals

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Wow

Walterk Walterk writes  |  more than 11 years ago

Wow, I've just discovered I've got friends right here on slashdot. So what does this tell me about me social life?

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