×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

Comments

top

Ask Slashdot: Are You Apocalypse-Useful?

Whorhay Re:Some of the oldest trades become useful. (727 comments)

I watched some interesting videos a while back that really helped me understand why spears were such a common weapon in ancient warfare. I had always thought it was just because they were incredibly cheap and fast to produce relative to a sword. But watching sparring sessions between swordsmen vs. a short spear was very eye opening. The guy with the sword really couldn't get in a hit without being forcefully jabbed while still attempting his attack.

3 days ago
top

Ask Slashdot: Are You Apocalypse-Useful?

Whorhay Re:Farming (727 comments)

I don't know that electricity would really be all that rare in a post apocalyptic setting. Building a generator, or adapting an existing motor, isn't really that difficult and there are bound to be enough electrical engineers around to establish small localized setups.

What I could see being a problem would be lack of refined fuel for running modern farm equipment. However most farm equipment runs on diesel fuels. Building a biodigestor is also not that technically challenging. And while a biodigestor runs best on high starch materials you can use grass cuttings if need be just with lower fuel output. I don't think we could keep farming the way we do now but we could revert to the methods used 30 or 40 years ago pretty readily. That would mean producing less food per farmer, but in a post apocalyptic scenario there would probably be a lot less mouths to feed.

Gunpowder could be a big problem for any warlord that doesn't have far reaching avenues of trade. The Charcoal and Potassium Nitrate should be relatively easy to get into production. But obtaining elemental sulfur would be a big problem. Sulfur can still be found in natural deposits but they are usually clustered around areas of volcanic activity. Most of the worlds sulfur is now produced as a by product of petroleum product processing. You can of course make far more modern propellants but they require significantly more complicated production and materials that I'm not sure would be any more practical.

3 days ago
top

How Cochlear Implants Are Being Blamed For Killing Deaf Culture

Whorhay Re:Let it die (507 comments)

Which in my opinion is all the more reason to keep alternative "medicine" around.

about a week ago
top

Navy Debuts New Railgun That Launches Shells at Mach 7

Whorhay Re:Another railgun proposal... (630 comments)

I think the big problem with something like that would be two fold. It would have to be mammoth in size, not just huge. That is becausethe impactor would have to receive all of it's velocity before release, instead of like an ICBM that throttles up once it is in the much thinner upper atmosphere. Missiles don't throttle up until they are at significant altitude because the forces of friction would destroy them at lower altitudes. A rail gun munition would have to be big enough that it could have an effective amount of mass left after literally burning it's way through the lower atmosphere.

The other problem is how do you aim such a thing? Your loop is already going to be absurdly large so that you can gradually alter the path of the projectile to keep it going in a circle. Any point at which there is a relatively sudden change in direction is going to have to be massively reinforced and I really don't even know how you'd achieve altering the projectiles direction at these speeds without it just ripping through the sidewalls. The rail gun in the article shoots at around 5000mph, which comes out to a relatively puny 1.38 miles per second. Ballistic missles need to be going about 2.5 mi/s when they are at low earth orbit altitudes on the way up, so it'll need to be going faster than that when it leaves the launch facility. Can you imagine what it would take to change the course of what would probably have to be a multi ton projectile hurtling through a tube at speeds significantly above 2.5 mi/s? We'd probably need a "barrel" many miles long.

What might be more possible would be a launch facility with several independant guns which can shoot in say 8 differing directions. Then use a projectile that is capable of guiding it's own course, probably using solid fuels, once it has been launched.

about a week ago
top

Navy Debuts New Railgun That Launches Shells at Mach 7

Whorhay Re:Holy shit (630 comments)

I likely takes a lot more electricity than that because the rail gun isn't going to be very energy efficient. I think I saw a large bank of capacitors in the background of the indoor photo. You wouldn't need such large capacitors, or so many of them, if it was only using 7.2kWh. Also the railgun is also firing a sabot of some sort that contains the 23 pound projectile. Regardless the article already pointed out that it is far cheaper to shoot than the chemically propelled shells. What I really want to see though is impact testing, I want to see things disintegrating explosively as a result of being hit by this thing.

about a week ago
top

How much do you spend yearly on mobile apps?

Whorhay Re:WOWZA! (240 comments)

I don't personally own any devices for which I would need any of these silly "app" things. However I would expect that enough of the visitors to this site are similiar to my Father.

My Father has had a fully equiped Wood and Metal working shop for as long as I can remember. Well that isn't exactly right, I can remember helping wrestle the metal lathe into the house as a child. Any time that something broke that he could conceivably fix on his own he did it. When he got into HAM Radio he designed and built his own antennas. In the same vein it wouldn't surprise me if many people here develop their own apps and or at the very least know where to get the same level of product for free.

about two weeks ago
top

New Service Lets You Hitch a Ride With Private Planes For Cost of Tank of Gas

Whorhay Re:Having a private pilots license (269 comments)

I seem to remember reading that the Boeing 747 has a glide ratio of 1:17. Meaning it can get 17 feet of forward motion for every foot of altitude. Honestly that kind of amazes me.

about two weeks ago
top

Prototype Volvo Flywheel Tech Uses Car's Wasted Brake Energy

Whorhay Re:Waiting since the '90's (262 comments)

I'm not sure which english you are refering to but I see no such rule that defines "at wheel" as being within some internet trolls arbitrary distance requirement. Having a motor inches from the wheel attached through a very short linkage is sufficiently close enough in my book to be considered "at the wheel".

about two weeks ago
top

Prototype Volvo Flywheel Tech Uses Car's Wasted Brake Energy

Whorhay Re:Waiting since the '90's (262 comments)

Not entirely accurate. Motors in the wheels would mean more unsprung mass. Motors at the wheel could be mounted to the body and attached to the wheel through a jointed shaft or something.

Motors in wheels are actually currently used in locomotives, where unsprung weight isn't much of any issue. I read about a company some years ago that was experimenting with using very light weight versions of their electric locomotive motors as the rim for a cars wheels. I can't be sure but I seem to remember the motorized rim weighed in at under 20 pounds.

about three weeks ago
top

Prototype Volvo Flywheel Tech Uses Car's Wasted Brake Energy

Whorhay Re:Gyroscopic precession (262 comments)

That depends on the implementation. Litmotors.com is actually developing an enclosed motorcycle which utilizes a gyroscope mounted under the drivers seat in order to keep the motorcycle upright, even in the case of being hit at high speed by a full size vehicle. The gyroscope is mounted in a motorized gimbal such that when the motorcycle is turning at speed the vehicle is tilted relative to the gyroscope. This of course requires a lot more complexity and computerized controls, which could fail spectacularly.

But to answer your concern specifically the flywheel could be mounted in a free floating gimbal so that the bike can move without changing the orientation of the flywheel.

about three weeks ago
top

Why Movie Streaming Services Are Unsatisfying — and Will Stay That Way

Whorhay Re:Nothing Worth Watching! (323 comments)

And every word has been sung and every note played, blah blah blah... If nothing appeals to your tastes then I'm sorry for you as life must suck if there is nothing of interest for you. Not everything new is better and neither is all that is old.

about three weeks ago
top

Why Movie Streaming Services Are Unsatisfying — and Will Stay That Way

Whorhay Re:Explanation for missing back catalog titles? (323 comments)

When Netflix started out the entertainment industry figured it would be a tiny market and not anything to worry about but might work as good PR. So they allowed licensing a ton of stuff at very decent rates. When Netflix and similiar services showed that it was a very viable and lucrative market the media companies started demanding much higher fees, whether content was old or not. In fact given that they are in the business of producing new content all the time and selling that, they want to discourage consumers spending time and money watching the old content. If Netflix had their way you'd be able to watch everything online as it is cheaper to run than the DvD service. but they can't afford to continue licensing all that older content, plus new content and keep their prices at the trivially low level.

about three weeks ago
top

Why Movie Streaming Services Are Unsatisfying — and Will Stay That Way

Whorhay Re:netflix is doing it wrong (323 comments)

I was pretty firmly in the camp of supporting Netflix in the net nuetrality debate until recently. When you dig into the issue it is less about net nuetrality and more about Netflix always using bottom of the barrel hosting providers that aren't on an even footing with the tier 1 services. This means they are at a big disadvantage so far as peering agreements go.

about three weeks ago
top

Why Movie Streaming Services Are Unsatisfying — and Will Stay That Way

Whorhay Re:Um. WRONG. (323 comments)

Meh, once upon a time I was a downloading fiend. In recent years though as I have become more financially stable and distribution of media has improved I find that I download almost nothing. I still keep a VPN account around just in case but rarely ever use it. The only things I download now seem to be TV show episodes that I got too far behind on to catch up on through the shows website. I don't mind muting my way through commercial breaks on the official steams so as long as they I can get it through the official sites I typically do.

I started watching Breaking Bad earlier this year on Netflix. I got to the end of the available episodes and was very much looking forward to seeing the last half of the final season but it wasn't available yet. The thought occured to me that I could just go download it but the trouble of setting up the VPN and everything was just too much of a hassle when I figured the episodes would show up on Netflix sooner or later, and they did.

about three weeks ago
top

Ask Slashdot: Fastest, Cheapest Path To a Bachelor's Degree?

Whorhay Re:A printer and a template (370 comments)

My Father took a few years off of work because of a no-compete clause. It took twice as long to get hired again because no one would consider hiring a guy with 25 years of experience without a BS. He finally found work as a contractor for a large non-profit, who had refused to consider his resume because of the lack of a degree. That same company had some policy about not keeping contractors for more than a couple of years. For a decade his bosses had to go round and round with the HR drones to keep him working there because finding someone willing to write and maintain assembler code for their mainframes was nearly impossible.

about three weeks ago
top

Diablo 3 Expansion Reaper of Souls Launches

Whorhay Re:Nope. (166 comments)

Witch Doctors can definitely use some ranged weapons. I don't remember which exactly but they can use ranged weapons. Most of the ranged weapons though seem to be Demon Hunter only.

Viable class builds was definitely an issue prior to the most recent patches. But honestly you have the same problem in most games like this. There is almost always some spec that is superior to all or most others and players gravitate towards them. With the 2.0 patch they changed a lot of skills and itemization, such that now there is much more variety. That said as the community gets a better handle on what is available and what works you are again seeing a few builds dominate the playing field. Although most of the time if you look into discussions about those builds you will see that the core of a build may center around 1 spender, a few defensive/utility abilities and 1 or two passives. That leaves a good bit of room for customization depending on gear choices and play style.

about three weeks ago
top

Diablo 3 Expansion Reaper of Souls Launches

Whorhay Re:Nope. (166 comments)

I think we might have played different Diablo 2's. The Diablo 2 I played had a level cap but you definitely weren't hitting it until long after you beat all the difficulty levels. The cap was 99, but somwhere in the early 90's you stopped getting experience for anything but Hell Baal kills. It took thousands of Hell Baal kills to get to 99.

The Auction House to me was a failure in that it was too easily accesible. There was tons of trading in Diablo 2 but you had to really go out of your way to do it in a meaningful way and get big benefits out of it.

I've enjoyed the torchlight games but haven't gotten nearly the same mileage out of them that I got out of the Diablo games. I think the big design decision in the Torchlight series that I couldn't stand was that spender abilities didn't benefit from leech affects and whatnot. I don't want to rely on boring generic attacks to heal and refill mana.

about three weeks ago
top

Diablo 3 Expansion Reaper of Souls Launches

Whorhay Re:From someone who gave up on the game... (166 comments)

1 - I don't think I'm seeing any more items actually drop, in fact I'm seen a good bit of evidence to the contrary. On the upside the quality of drops is better because of the "smart loot" feature and the general revamp of items and their properties.

2 - That is the "smart loot" system which for rares has something like a 20% chance to affect an item. Legendaries seem to nearly always be smart loot drops, which in combination with the revamp of legendaries in general makes for better items.

My only complaint is the Bind on Account for all Set and Legendary drops. I don't particularily mind the loss of the AH. But not being able to trade the items that are actually very time consuming to find is very frustrating.

I can't play with clan mates and friends without looking like a jerk, because I crush the monsters in the difficulties they play on. They can't play on higher difficulty levels where I play because then they can't manage to survive by themselves for long. Neither of those is much fun. This could be solved by giving them some of the extra equipment I have stashed to bring them up closer to my level of gear, except that stuff is all BoA so no go anymore on that. I could in theory gimp myself by equiping crappier gear, but again that isn't fun for me either.

about three weeks ago
top

Diablo 3 Expansion Reaper of Souls Launches

Whorhay Re:Too Little Too Late (166 comments)

I don't really see how the height of the level cap actually matters. What I think would matter is more than just a single extra Act worth of storyline. They did some other content including a new character but it does seem pretty shallow for a $40 expansion.

about three weeks ago

Submissions

top

Ask Slashdot: VPN reviews and the new ISP six strikes Agreement

Whorhay Whorhay writes  |  about a year ago

Whorhay (1319089) writes "In view of the news that many of the major ISPs in the USA are enacting a six strike agreement this week, I have developed a keen interest in using a VPN for my home internet connection. My google foo skills though are apparently lacking as I was not able to find much in the way of reviews for VPN services that didn't appear to be marketing chaff. So I'm turning to Slashdot to ask: What VPN services do you recommend and why?"
Link to Original Source
top

DoJ asks Supreme Court to take up GPS tracking

Whorhay Whorhay writes  |  more than 2 years ago

Whorhay (1319089) writes "The DOJ has been directed by the Obama Administration to push the Supreme Court to take up the legality of Warrantless GPS Tracking. This on the heels of the a federal appeals court in Washington overturning the conviction of a man citing warrantless GPS tracking as violating his fourth ammendmant rights."
Link to Original Source

Journals

Whorhay has no journal entries.

Slashdot Account

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?

Don't worry, we never post anything without your permission.

Submission Text Formatting Tips

We support a small subset of HTML, namely these tags:

  • b
  • i
  • p
  • br
  • a
  • ol
  • ul
  • li
  • dl
  • dt
  • dd
  • em
  • strong
  • tt
  • blockquote
  • div
  • quote
  • ecode

"ecode" can be used for code snippets, for example:

<ecode>    while(1) { do_something(); } </ecode>
Sign up for Slashdot Newsletters
Create a Slashdot Account

Loading...