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Why Screen Lockers On X11 Cannot Be Secure

Wrath0fb0b Re:physical access (133 comments)

Comparing this to Windows is silly, because Windows doesn't have anything like the X11 protocol. On Windows, running code can disable the screen saver in other ways: patching or replacing DLLs, changing system configuration, etc. No difference from a security point of view.

I'm no Windows fanboy, but this is just factually incorrect.

(1) All those operations require elevation, so unless the user has lowered UAC from the default, they will require authentication. I suppose a malicious installer could do that, but it is emphatically incorrect that any running code can effect that change.

(2) Since 7, when Windows elevates it completely suspends the old 'Desktop' and creates a brand new one for the elevation prompt. If you look closely, you'll realize that all the other 'windows' are actually just a static screenshot of what happened on the unprivileged desktop at the point where the elevation prompt was created.

So "from a security point of view", on Windows you have a specific privilege required to change the SS that is mediated through a privileged interface where it cannot be snooped/intercepted by unprivileged processes.

[ Of course, this comparison is also patently unfair -- Windows 7 was written in the 2000s, X11 was written in the 1980s. Expecting them to be comparable in terms of security is pretty ridiculous. ]

1 hour ago
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Calif. DMV Back-Pedals On Commercial-Plate Mandate For Ride-Share Drivers

Wrath0fb0b Re:Why should the requirements be onerous?? (208 comments)

Reading posts in context is pretty key. For instance, I was replying to a post with the claim:

you simply check off a different box on the registration form when you register it

When now (taking your info) it should specify that you check a box and pay more for registration and your insurance costs more.

So you are right, and the guy to which I was responding was wrong. Doubly wrong for using "simply" for something that wasn't simply that.

2 days ago
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Calif. DMV Back-Pedals On Commercial-Plate Mandate For Ride-Share Drivers

Wrath0fb0b Re:Cumbersome to obtain (208 comments)

Mostly (a). For instance, most registration can be done online but comercial still requires an in-person trip to the DMV. The fees are also higher for no perceptible reason, but (c) is off the mark since we are talking about commercial vehicle registration, not commercial driver licensing.

As to the last question, I don't think it matters. If the State wants to impose a uniform insurance requirement (details tbd) on all taxis and similar ride services, they can go ahead and do that directly and clearly. There's no need to tie it to registration or any other thing -- just go ahead and plainly say that you need such-and-such insurance if you give rides in exchange for money.

[ Of course, that would increase the cost of traditional taxis just as much as Uber, which is (IMHO) a feature of a fair set of regulations. They are supposed to protect the customers by providing insurance/inspection/training requirements, not pick favorites among competitors. ]

2 days ago
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Calif. DMV Back-Pedals On Commercial-Plate Mandate For Ride-Share Drivers

Wrath0fb0b Re:Why should the requirements be onerous?? (208 comments)

If it was just a matter of ticking off a different check box, why wouldn't every Uber drive just go ahead and do that when registering? In fact, if checking an additional box gave you more privileges, why wouldn't everyone do it all the time?

In practice, of course, it's not at all "just checking the box" but rather a red-tape nightmare of confusing and contradictory regulations. The process needs to be cleaned up and the regulations (which I'm sure the content of which are mostly fine) need to be stated clearly and applied uniformly. That's not too much to ask.

2 days ago
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Calif. DMV Back-Pedals On Commercial-Plate Mandate For Ride-Share Drivers

Wrath0fb0b Cumbersome to obtain (208 comments)

Commercial licenses are cumbersome to obtain...

Maybe the DMV should streamline the process instead of lowering the requirements? In fact, living in CA I can say that the DMV has pretty reasonable objective requirements/policies even when they have godawful process/implementation.

They should make it trivially easy for anyone that meets a set of clearly-defined objective requirements -- training, insurance, inspection, whatever else -- to get a commercial license. I don't even particularly care what the content of those requirements is -- so long as they are non-arbitrary and enforced even-handedly.

[ In fact, they ought to do the same for cabs -- write up the requirements, then implement them. Most of the reason for Uber is that cities had these absurd fixed-number-of-medallions systems anyway. By doing that they ultimately authored their own destruction. ]

3 days ago
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How Bitcoin Could Be Key To Online Voting

Wrath0fb0b Awesome for botnet owners too (480 comments)

In addition to selling your credit card and social security numbers, they can now offer to sell your vote for 10 cents apiece. Just harvest the private keys and it's a race to see which botnet can sign with the stolen key first! Sell them on TOR or I2P, I'm pretty sure Koch and Soros will bid big money to literally buy the election -- you can auction them against each other.

And if you say "we'll put the private key on a dedicated USB stick only for voting" then not only have you killed a lot of the convenience (for instance, you cannot do it from a phone but need a PC that can act as a USB host) but you've just moved the point of pwnage up a little bit to having to steal it right as you vote (or present a bogus voting interface!).

Really what you need is a set of physically separate machines that people can go to and plug their USB drive into a known secure environment. You could even put them in convenient nearby locations like schools and churches ...

about two weeks ago
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Drunk Drivers in California May Get Mandated Interlock Devices

Wrath0fb0b Re:How about mandatory felony sentences instead? (420 comments)

Whenever you are suspected of drunk driving by exceeding the roadside breathalyser test, you are taken to the police station to get another blood alcohol reading. The police station breathalysers are recognised by the courts as providing an accurate and lawful reading, this is unless you want to challenge the validity of the process in court with expert testimony that the police station alcohol test was improper in some way.

Easier solution: if you are drunk, do not consent to the breathalyzer/blood test. They can still try to convict you, but it's a lot harder without the forensic evidence. That can also try to phone a judge and get a warrant, but that takes time and judges don't like being woken up -- if they have a warrant, you have to comply. And don't let them try any of this "implied consent" nonsense, the US Supreme Court has recently affirmed that a motorist can withdraw/refuse consent to any test at any point, see Missouri v. McNeely explicitly holding that neither implied consent nor exigency allows the police to compel a DUI test without first obtaining a warrant.

Of course, you can have your license suspended for refusing the test (i.e. the right to refuse consent to the test does not confer immunity from the consequences) but that's all civil. You'll have a much better chance at avoiding the criminal conviction and subsequent stint in jail.

about 1 month ago
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Drunk Drivers in California May Get Mandated Interlock Devices

Wrath0fb0b Re:How about mandatory felony sentences instead? (420 comments)

Unfortunately the only thing that I can think of that might make a dent would be to penalize establishments that serve patrons until they're legally drunk

Penalizing those of us that walk/cab/transit home from a night out (after leaving the car at home like a responsible human being) is really the best you can think of?

about 1 month ago
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5,200 Days Aboard ISS, and the Surprising Reason the Mission Is Still Worthwhile

Wrath0fb0b Re: Shut it down (219 comments)

That's 43% of discretionary spending, which is itself about 30% of total spending. Spending Social Security and Medicare/Medicaid are both individually 1.5x as large as medical spending.

Here's that in pie chart form and in infographic form. All numbers from the Congressional OMB.

about 1 month ago
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Ask Slashdot: Can a Felon Work In IT?

Wrath0fb0b A felon with misdemeanor convictions? (720 comments)

OP said: "I'm a felon with several prior misdemeanor convictions".

Don't you mean a felon with prior felony convictions? As far as I understand (please do correct me if I'm wrong) you cannot be treated as a felon for misdemeanor offenses, no matter how numerous.

Also, I'm going to give the benefit of the doubt that the statement was just clumsily phrased but even so, the wording ought to be fixed to be crystal clear.

about 2 months ago
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UK Announces 'Google Tax'

Wrath0fb0b Re:If You Had An Electronic Currency (602 comments)

The problem with taxing at a fixed percentage of volume is that it penalizes high-volume low-margin businesses relative to the high-margin ones. That introduces serious inefficiency by artificially lowering the relative cost of expensive good relative to cheaper ones (which is also regressive*).

In practice, States try to soften the regressive nature of fixed-percentage taxes by devising a classification scheme wherein essential goods like food are taxed at a different rate (sometimes zero). That leads to a separate inefficiency where now people start to game and dispute the classification, leading to high-stakes court battles about wether Jaffa cakes are a cake or biscuit.

* Most commodities like gas* and groceries fall into the "high volume low margin" category, so this will harder hit the lower class that spends a large percentage on its income on commodities. In the US, gas stations average 3c on each dollar spent on gas, less than half the average margin for a private business in the US. YMMV in other countries.

about 2 months ago
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Will Lyft and Uber's Shared-Ride Service Hurt Public Transit?

Wrath0fb0b Re:should be banned or regulated (237 comments)

I don't think anyone claims that Uber should not have insured drivers or should permit their drivers to discriminated by race.

What they do claim, is that it's ridiculous for the city to have a fixed number of medallions for drivers, instead of letting anyone that meets the (insurance,inspection,background,...) checks compete under the same set of rule. The sad fact in a number of cities is that possession of an arbitrary token is more important that substantive comliance with an objective set of requirements.

about 2 months ago
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Ask Slashdot: Can You Say Something Nice About Systemd?

Wrath0fb0b Socket Activation/Passing (928 comments)

With a dozen or so lines of code you can convert any services that listens on a socket (UNIX, INET, NETLINK or POSIX) to have systemd create the socket and pass it in -- and that includes code to fall back to socket creation if it's not launched by systemd. This has a few benefits:

  • Startup: Services don't need to signal back init systems that a service is ready to receive requests (or, worse: I've seen colleagues either put in a sleep, or having dependent processes poll, shudder). As soon as the socket is created, requests can be received. When the process is ready to read/select, it gets everything in the buffer.

    In fact, while a ton of people are focused on the way systemd manages dependencies between startup processes, they overlook that socket-passing actually removes dependencies between them. In other words, even if you have some horribly complex web of socket-based services, you can treat them as entirely independent.

  • On-demand-services: Got a socket service that doesn't have tight startup latency requirements and is launched infrequently like sshd or ntpd? Why does it have to stick around all the time consuming resources? Let systemd hold the socket and launch it whenever a client connects and just exit() when your last client goes away. Apple has been doing this for years -- aggressively reclaiming memory from daemons that don't need to be immediately available. This also improves startup times because non-essential services aren't launching at the same time as essential ones, decreasing CPU/IO thrash -- I've seen admins create init-groups that launch 5 minutes after startup for this purpose actually, this solves the issue more sensibly.
  • Crashes: Services that crash obviously lose all session state, but having the socket persist means that requests never get rejected -- they just wait a bit longer. For a concrete example, if Apache relies on SQL and then SQL crashes, obviously any in-flight queries are going to return errors. But new queries launched by different Apache worker threads will just sit in the socket buffer until SQL comes back to life. This is a pretty big win for mitigating client impact.
  • In-place-updates: Services that need to be updated/patched are just a different manifestation of the "Crash" bullet above. Need to patch your services without killing all its clients? Stop processing new requests, fulfill everything in the queue, restart, pick up where you left off. Unless the client is closely monitoring the latency of requests, they won't even know that the service was patched underneath them.

So that's at least one thing that systemd brings that other init systems don't, that solves a few real problems and enables some new features that other init systems can't.

about 3 months ago
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Debate Over Systemd Exposes the Two Factions Tugging At Modern-day Linux

Wrath0fb0b Re:How about we hackers? (863 comments)

Actually systemd doesn't care if it's actually running yet or not, because it already created a socket listening on port 80/443 (or whatever) and passed it to Apache. If anyone tries to send something to 80, it will be queued in the socket's buffer, and once Apache finishes its startup goo, it will process the backlog.

In other words, there's a third state in between "Not Ready" and "Fully Ready" which is "I'm ready enough to receive and enqueue requests without dropping them but I can't fulfill them immediately". Once a service hits that state, no one should care any further.

[ Bonus round: if Apache crashes, that's fine too because systemd keeps the socket around and passes it to the relaunched instance with all the pending requests intact. Which actually means that it never goes to "Not even ready to receive requests" even on crash and all requests are seamlessly processed. ]

about 3 months ago
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Debate Over Systemd Exposes the Two Factions Tugging At Modern-day Linux

Wrath0fb0b Re:Administrators dislike constraint based systems (863 comments)

Administrators dislike constraint based systems. ...
it insists on controlling file descriptors and sockets and Mach ports for the things it starts - which means you have to rewrite a lot of at least the startup code in most Open Source software to tolerate being run by something that opens the files and sockets that it expects to do itself.

First of all, it's about a dozen lines of code in the daemon to be able to query if you've been passed in a socket and, only then fall back to creating it yourself. And that's backwards compatible. There's example code totalling no more than a single page.

Second, Administrators ought to love the model of daemon's receiving the socket because it actually removes constraints entirely, instead of just managing them. You're correct that admins dislike constraint-based systems instead of imperative ones, but removing the constraint is even more favorable -- an real admin should love nothing more for the applications to sign a contract that says "You can launch me and my dependencies in any order and we will Do The Right Thing(TM)". Socket activation does exactly that.

about 3 months ago
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Austin Airport Tracks Cell Phones To Measure Security Line Wait

Wrath0fb0b Re:Randomized MAC for background scans ... (168 comments)

Yes, when you get to the front of the line you should pay attention to the instructions. In the meantime, while you are waiting to get to the front of the line, there's nothing to pay attention to.

about 3 months ago
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Austin Airport Tracks Cell Phones To Measure Security Line Wait

Wrath0fb0b Randomized MAC for background scans ... (168 comments)

If you've got a recent iPhone, it's already randomizing the MAC used for background scans:

When iOS 8 is not associated with a Wi-Fi network and a device's processor is asleep, iOS 8 uses a randomized Media Access Control (MAC) address when conducting PNO scans. When iOS 8 is not associated with a Wi-Fi network or a device's processor is asleep, iOS 8 uses a randomized MAC address when conducting ePNO scans. Because a device's MAC address now changes when it's not connected to a network, it can't be used to persistently track a device by passive observers of Wi-Fi traffic.

Of course, that doesn't work if you are using the phone to read Twitter while waiting in line, because seriously, what else are you expected to do while shuffling along?

about 3 months ago
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Four Dutch Uberpop Taxi Drivers Arrested, Fined

Wrath0fb0b Re:Biased summary (282 comments)

This isn't a product, it is a service. So ergo the only way to regulate the service is to regulate the person doing the selling.

And you can regulate the person doing the selling and the car he's driving without favoring one person over another or empowering a cartel.

Falling into the "regulation-bad" "regulation good" dichotomy is really killing us here. Regulating the driver's record, the vehicle and his insurance is eminently sensible. Beyond that, it's just protectionism.

about 3 months ago
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Four Dutch Uberpop Taxi Drivers Arrested, Fined

Wrath0fb0b Re:Biased summary (282 comments)

I really don't have any problem with any of the requirements you've listed at the end there, so long as they are administered objectively and impartially. They all seem unobjectionable.

But providing favorable treatment to some licensed taxi companies over others -- such as the use of taxi stands and spaces -- rubs me as unjustified favoritism.

about 3 months ago
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Four Dutch Uberpop Taxi Drivers Arrested, Fined

Wrath0fb0b Re:Biased summary (282 comments)

What kind of person bills his grandmother for taking her to the supermarket? Jeezz...

Repeat after me: "it's against the law to drive people around for money without the proper credentials".

Your bit about "without proper credentials" makes it sound like all that's needed is for a driver to apply for a license and meet some objective requirements like driving records, vehicle inspections and insurance. If that were the case, you'd have a lot more folks siding with the law.

Instead, in order to pick up a fare in Amsterdam, you need to meet some other arbitrary requirements, chief among them being a member of a TTO ("Regulated Taxi Organization") with at least 100 cars. And to pick up a fare from a taxi stand in Amsterdam, you need a further license -- one given at the discretion of the municipality for "professionalism".

So there we have it -- there's a whole set of common sense regulations that are applied and that anyone can meet based on a set of objective criteria. Then there's another set that got "glued on" which makes no sense at all. So ditch the latter, and soon you'll find there's no reason for uber at all.

[ But hey, at least it's not as bad as the US medallion system ! ]

about 3 months ago

Submissions

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Revelations on the French Big Brother

Wrath0fb0b Wrath0fb0b writes  |  about a year and a half ago

Wrath0fb0b (302444) writes "Days after President François Hollande sternly told the United States to stop spying on its allies, the newspaper Le Monde disclosed on Thursday that France has its own large program of data collection, which sweeps up nearly all the data transmissions, including telephone calls, e-mails and social media activity, that come in and out of France. The report notes that "our email messages, SMS messages, itemised phone bills and connections to FaceBook and Twitter are then stored for years."

For those /.ers that grok Français, you can read the original at Le Monde or the translated version from LM. The NYT also has a writeup on the story."

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US Supreme Court upholds First Sale doctrine for works manufactured abroad

Wrath0fb0b Wrath0fb0b writes  |  about 2 years ago

Wrath0fb0b (302444) writes "The US Supreme Court reversed the $600,000 fine for a student who imported cheaper textbooks from Thailand and resold them for a profit in the US. The ruling affirms that the exclusive right of importation is subject to the same limitations (first sale, archival, fair use) as the restriction on reproduction and that a book bought abroad by a lawful assignee of the copyright is "lawfully obtained" for the purposes of the First Sale doctrine. The dissent focused more closely on the intent of Congress in passing the Copyright Act, and called the Court's decision a "bold departure from Congress’ design" and said it was at odd's with the US treaty position on copyright exhaustion. The opinion is also notable for the odd lineup, with three of the Court's liberal wing joining three of the more conservatives Justices in the 6-3 majority in favor of the appellant (the Court is current split 4-1-4)."
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Facebook iOS App Ditching HTML5 for ObjectiveC

Wrath0fb0b Wrath0fb0b writes  |  more than 2 years ago

Wrath0fb0b (302444) writes "The New York Times reports that Facebook is overhauling their iOS App to ditch their HTML5 based UI for a native ObjectiveC one. This is an about face from their position a few months ago in which FB wonks said HTML5 would allows them to write once run anyhwere. While WORA certainly has a lot of appeal for both programmers (due to desire not to duplicate effort) and management alike (due to desire not to pay programmers to duplicate effort), the large number of negative reviews that FB for iOS has illustrate that this approach is not without drawbacks. No matter how the new app is received, this is more fuel on the native vs. web-app fire."
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CA Governor Vetoes Bill Protecting Arrestees' Cell

Wrath0fb0b Wrath0fb0b writes  |  more than 3 years ago

Wrath0fb0b (302444) writes "The U.S. Supreme Court let stand Diaz v. California, a Fourth Amendment case from California's Supreme Court which held that a cell phone can be searched incident to a lawful arrest. Meanwhile, over the summer, California state legislators passed SB 914, a bill limiting searches incident to arrest in California. Just today, however, California Governor Jerry Brown vetoed the bill stating that the courts are better suited to resolve complex and case specific issues relating to constitutional search-and-seizures protections.

Noted Fourth Amendment scholar Orin Kerr opines that Governor Brown has it exactly backwards and lays out the advantages of the legislature in rapidly-evolving fields such as new technology and their ability to better assess facts, amend the law to reflect the latest technology and disregard precedents that they feel no longer ought to apply. He argues that legislatures are much better equipped than courts to strike the balance between security and privacy when technology is in flux."

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US Supreme Court: Video games qualify for First A

Wrath0fb0b Wrath0fb0b writes  |  more than 3 years ago

Wrath0fb0b (302444) writes "The United States Supreme Court threw out a California law prohibiting the sale of violent video games to minors (signed by a man who would never pander violence to children). Notable in the opinion is a historical review of the condemnation of "unworthy" material that would tend to corrupt children, starting with penny-novels and up through comic books and music lyrics. The opinion is also notable for the odd lineup of Justices that defies normal ideological lines, with one conservative and one liberal jurist dissenting on entirely different grounds. In the process, they continue the broad rule that the First Amendment does not vary with the technological means used:

Video games qualify for First Amendment protection. Like protected books, plays, and movies, they communicate ideas through familiar literary devices and features distinctive to the medium. And the basic principles of freedom of speech . . . do not vary with a new and different communication medium.

"

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Study on Endowment Effects in IP Transactions

Wrath0fb0b Wrath0fb0b writes  |  more than 4 years ago

Wrath0fb0b (302444) writes "[Disclosure: I'm not involved in any way in this research or Cornell, nor do I know any of the researchers or papers cited. ]

The endowment effect is a long-studied cognitive bias in which owners of property consistently assign it a higher value for sale (WTA, willing to accept) than non-owners for purchase (WTP, willing to pay). This effect is occurs even if the property is assigned randomly, meaning it is independent of the fact that we acquire things we consider valuable or have experienced as valuable. A brief overview of the evidence for the effect, and a number of possible psychological bases for this bias, are discussed in the paper.

This studyis the first to test the extent and manner in which this effect applies to transactions involving IP — that is, non-rivalrous goods. Subjects (undergrads) were divided into three groups based on their order of scheduling: the first third became Authors; the middle third became Bidders; and the final third became Owners. The authors were told to write a poem for entry into a contest, in which the winner would be awarded $50. They were then asked at what price they would be willing to sell their chance of winning — their WTA for the work. Each bidder was assigned a single poem and asked at what price they would be willing to buy that poems chance of winning. Finally, each owner was assigned a single poem, told that they already "owned it", and asked for a WTA for that work's chance of winning.

The results were in line with what one might expect from Endowment Effect literature — Authors and Owners both valued the poems at nearly twice as high as bidders, which is even more interesting because what was being "sold" here was only partial alienation of the property — the author would continue to have the poem for personal use but sold only the winnings from the contest. Even more interestingly, the results do not change much if you allow all the subjects to read all the poems entered into the contest before writing their bids/sells. Nor do they change if you inform the subjects that the winning poem will be selected by lottery instead of by subjective judgment. The conclusions for the rational structuring of IP law are broad and generally point towards a "liability rules" (what we would call compulsory-licensing) over the extant "property rules" (what we would call the current system in which the owner retains the unlimited power to refuse to sell). As the authors put it more verbosely:

Our findings suggest that private transactions in creative goods may face significant transaction costs arising from cognitive biases. These biases in turn drive the price that creators and owners of IP are likely to demand considerably higher than buyers will, on average, be willing to pay. This discovery does not mean, of course, that transactions in IP will not take place — we see such transactions happening every day. Our research suggests, however, both that IP transactions may occur at a frequency that is significantly suboptimal and that the baleful effect of cognitive and affective biases is likely to be more serious for transactions in works of relatively low commercial value or for which no well-established custom or pattern helps to inform valuation. These results have considerable implications for the structuring of IP rights, IP formalities, IP licensing, and fair use.

Most broadly, we believe that our results should inform the ongoing debate over whether IP law is best structured around property rules or liability rules. Additionally, we argue that our results point toward the advisability of copyright re-formalization, which is best achieved via reformulation of copyright as remedies provisions to limit owners of works that are unregistered (and therefore presumptively of low commercial value) to the effective equivalent of a liability rule. Finally, our findings should inform copyright'(TM)s fair use doctrine. Many courts considering the fair use defense already base their analysis, in part, on the presence of significant transaction costs that lower the likelihood that the parties would have negotiated a license and therefore make fair use more appropriate. In light of our findings, courts should consider whether a license for the use at issue in a particular case would likely be subject to significant endowment effects. If so, it is less likely that the parties would have struck a deal as an alternative to the defendant'(TM)s unauthorized use, therefore making a finding of fair use more appropriate.

"

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OSU Pres Cans Anthrax Vaccine Research on Primates

Wrath0fb0b Wrath0fb0b writes  |  more than 5 years ago

Wrath0fb0b (302444) writes "OSU President Burns Hargis has abruptly canceled an NIH-funded study on an anthrax vaccine on primates, who would then have to be euthanized. Suspicion that the decision was meant to appease large donor Madeleine Pickens, the wife of noted huntsman T. Boone Pickens, who had previously pressured the school over animal-rights issues. Scientists counter that the study was approved by the NIH peer-review process, the Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee (IACUC) and subject to the Federal Animal Welfare Act (by virtue of using NIH money) and that the decision by the President is short-circuited months of planning and deliberation on the matter.

Hargis has denied being influenced by Pickens and cited "confidential factors" that he couldn't discuss, telling the faculty council that "to go through every lurid detail is simply not prudent". A post on Pickens' blog, on the other hand, obliquely takes credit for the "great decision", noting the a faculty hunch that ""generous benefactor to OSU and her ties to the Humane Society of the United States may have played a role in the termination of the project". Meanwhile, the NIH expressed displeasure at the decision, releasing a statement that stated "NIH fully expects institutions to honor these assurances and commitment to complete NIH supported projects as requested, approved and funded". Some OSU scientists speculated that the fiasco would make it harder for them to receive NIH funding in the future.

Read more: http://www.newsok.com/anthrax-study-rejected-by-osu/article/3421451#ixzz0aIt7Qy5y
Angry reaction: http://speakingofresearch.com/2009/12/16/standing-together-widespread-support-for-osu-and-its-research/
More angry reaction: http://scienceblogs.com/drugmonkey/2009/12/oklahoma_legislator_displeased.php
School responds: http://newsok.com/osu-chief-discusses-research-decision/article/3423662?custom_click=headlines_widget
Pickens' blog post: http://www.madeleinepickens.com/news/osu-president-cancels-antrax-study-proposal-requiring-primate-euthanasia/"

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