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Sid Meier's New Game Is About Starships

WuphonsReach Re:A Boom in Civilization (227 comments)

EVE seems to be doing OK, and while there's war to participate in if you want to, there are plenty of people making money from mining, research, logistics, and so on.

All activities in EVE (other then agent-driven mission running) are PvP. Selling on the market? You're PvPing against the other sellers who want to undercut you and sell their product faster. Mining? You're competing to harvest before someone else comes and harvests the resource.

about two weeks ago
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Sid Meier's New Game Is About Starships

WuphonsReach Re:anything has to be better than beyond earth (227 comments)

One unit per tile (1UT) sucks on the Civ5 maps because the hexes are way too large for the scale. The only way 1 unit/tile would have worked well would have been to subdivide the hexes into 7 smaller hexes while keeping the cities the same size (taking up multiple hexes).

The other major issue with the series is that instead of simply improving upon the Civ4 series (by adding hexes and fixing the stack of death issues and doing work on the AI), they brought in a brand new designer who threw out all the lessons of the past in order to put his mark on the product.

The result was a poor product with numerous bugs and many balance issues and a definite downgrade from Civ4's quality.

about two weeks ago
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Tiny Fanless Mini-PC Runs Linux Or Windows On Quad-core AMD SoC

WuphonsReach Re:How to choose a UPS (180 comments)

Any suggestions - ideally for models that let you lower the alert volume or disable the audible alert entirely? And have USB port protocols that work with Linux?

about two weeks ago
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Tiny Fanless Mini-PC Runs Linux Or Windows On Quad-core AMD SoC

WuphonsReach Re:Perhaps at last an affordable mini PC? (180 comments)

Give it a SSD and 8GB of RAM and useful life might approach a decade. It might add $100 to the cost, but will definitely make it into something that will be useful for more then 2-3 years.

about two weeks ago
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PHP vs. Node.js: the Battle For Developer Mind Share

WuphonsReach Re:The battle of WEB developer mindshare (245 comments)

Java is going to be the COBOL of modern languages - it will be around 10-30 years from now or more.

And if you learn to use AspectJ and a good code generation tool like Spring Roo, a lot of the pain points about Java go away. Sprinkle in a good framework along with things like Maven and JUnit testing. At this point it's a very mature language with a fully fleshed out ecosystem.

about two weeks ago
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PHP vs. Node.js: the Battle For Developer Mind Share

WuphonsReach Re:VPS hosting and IPv4 address exhaustion (245 comments)

Or can we ignore IE/XP and Android 2 (whose TLS stacks don't support multiple certificates on port 443 of an IP address) by now?

Well, WinXP is out of support and Android 2 is ancient at this point - both have less then 15% market share and are dropping reasonably quickly. So overall, you might only impact 1 in 10 visitors for a project that launches in a few months.

In another year, that will probably be 1 in 25. In terms of development dollars spent vs projected income, trying to support that under 10% market share which will vanish within 2-3 years is probably not worth it.

about two weeks ago
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Tips For Securing Your Secure Shell

WuphonsReach Re:Simpler (148 comments)

#3 should be "only allow public key based authentication"

#4 would then be "enable two factor"

(Not using passwords for SSH logins can be done out of the box with a simple config file change. Enabling two-factor is a good bit more complex.)

about three weeks ago
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Tips For Securing Your Secure Shell

WuphonsReach Re:Well Then (148 comments)

Moving services like ssh to a higher, non-default port is not done for "security". It is primarily to reduce the noise written to logs.

A reduction of 2-4 orders of magnitude. Which brings benefits to the security side because you have far less false positive reports to wade through. So it's not primarily done for security, but every little bit helps.

about three weeks ago
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Ancient Planes and Other Claims Spark Controversy at Indian Science Congress

WuphonsReach Re:...and... (381 comments)

I still can't follow his logic; but, it doesn't bode well for (what I assume is) the common Russian understanding of Science.

Replace "Russian" with "80% of humanity" and you'd be closer to the mark. The average person has barely enough critical thinking skills to get by in life. They'll believe anything that makes the world into a simpler place so that they can have the delusion of understanding it all.

about three weeks ago
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Know Your Type: Five Mechanical Keyboards Compared

WuphonsReach Re:Programming keyboard (190 comments)

Mechanical keyboards only require more force to use if you are using them wrong. As you depress the mechanical switch, there is a tactile click as the switch engages but before the key bottoms out. A proper touch typist will begin to let up on the pressing down motion as soon as that click is felt. There's no need to mash the keys all the way to the bottom.

The other reason that mechanical keyboards can feel tiresome is that people do not position their wrists properly (keep them off the desk!), or fail to tilt the keyboard.

about 1 month ago
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Schneier Explains How To Protect Yourself From Sony-Style Attacks (You Can't)

WuphonsReach Re:Sony security: strong or weak? (343 comments)

If your mail system doesn't strip out executable content from attachments (especially the low-hanging fruit like EXE, DLL, SCR, etc.) -- then your IT folks need to be beaten with a clue bat.

Heck, that rule should have been in place almost two decades ago at this point once the various VBS / SCR trojans first started hitting mail user's inboxes.

about a month ago
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Seagate Bulks Up With New 8 Terabyte 'Archive' Hard Drive

WuphonsReach Re:these are WORM drives (219 comments)

Modern versions of Linux - you don't need "noatime" for ext4. The "defaults" uses "relatime" by default, which does a fake atime and doesn't break applications that are looking for atime.

about a month and a half ago
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French Publishers Prepare Lawsuit Against Adblock Plus

WuphonsReach Re:They can go bite a donkey (699 comments)

I've taken vendors to task for making changes to their site that required that I allow dozens of sites. They had a simple choice - fix things, or I take my business elsewhere.

If you don't complain - then they will keep doing what they are doing.

about a month and a half ago
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Samsung SSD 850 EVO 32-Layer 3D V-NAND-Based SSD Tested

WuphonsReach Re:Why no 2tb model? (127 comments)

You're young. Early PCs cost 4-5k. Individual hard drives were in the $1000 range back in the 80s.

For someone who absolutely needs 10TB of zero-wait storage in a 2.5" form factor, 4-5k is not a big deal. Because pretty soon it will be $2000, then $1000, then $500.

Inexpensive enterprise SSD is having a big impact on how you spec out servers now. Do you build something with a bunch of 15k RPM drives in a RAID 0+1 array, short-stroked and end up with about 1TB of useful space? Or do you simply put 2x1TB in a RAID-1 array in a much smaller unit?

I paid about $650 per drive last week for 1TB enterprise quality SSDs. I expect them to be below $400 by this time next year. By 2016, I suspect you will not be able to buy a 15k RPM SAS drive as the enterprise SSDs are crushing them from above on price/performance.

about a month and a half ago
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Consortium Roadmap Shows 100TB Hard Drives Possible By 2025

WuphonsReach Re:100k employees making 100k a day in email (215 comments)

(shrugs) your IT is definitely stuck in the 2000s (i.e. 5+ years ago).

Cost per TB (raw storage, the hardware to hold the storage, plus the backup tapes / disks) for bulk storage - is definitely more like $800-$1000 per TB these days and not $10k. The sweet spot for bulk storage these days is the 3TB 3.5" enterprise SATA drives at about $230 each. Add in the loss of capacity due to RAID + server costs and you're at about $500/TB of actual storage.

Primary storage is still much more expensive at $1500-$2000 per TB. But primary storage is using SSDs (around $1/GB) or 15k SAS drives (about $0.35/GB to $0.50/GB). And not the relatively inexpensive 3TB enterprise drives at $0.08/GB.

about 2 months ago
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Windows 10 To Feature Native Support For MKV and FLAC

WuphonsReach Re:About time (313 comments)

After all those years of the big sweaty one Nadella is just the breath of fresh air that MSFT needed!

I'll believe that once they spin off some divisions and simplify licensing costs for corporate users. And release all of their applications on Android + iOS + OS X.

This is just a retrenchment. Their game plan is still "lock-in lock-in lock-in", also known as "Embrace, Extend, Extinguish".

about 2 months ago
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Consortium Roadmap Shows 100TB Hard Drives Possible By 2025

WuphonsReach Re:How about transfer rate and reliability? (215 comments)

In practice, SSDs have only 20-100x the IOPS of a similar number of spinning platter drives. Which is still a huge improvement, but not three orders of magnitude (1000x). The bigger advantage is that when you have more workers accessing the drive, latency performance doesn't dive off a cliff like it does with spinning platter drives. It instead degrades gracefully on the SSDs.

SSDs are definitely edging 15k SAS drives out of the market. SSDs do everything at 15k SAS drives can do, with at least an order of magnitude more IOPS/drive, for only about 2-4x the cost of the 15k SAS drive. And putting a writeback SSD cache in front of a spinning platter drive array is even more economical.

about 2 months ago
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How Intel and Micron May Finally Kill the Hard Disk Drive

WuphonsReach Re:What about long-term data integrity? (438 comments)

A powered-down SSD that has been written once should be able to retain data for ~10 years or so. Longer if kept in a cool place.

Nope. Most MLC SSDs will lose their data in about a year and the TLC SSDs in about 6 months of being powered off. (Don't confuse older flash media which was probably SLC with newer MLC/TLC media. Or which had larger feature sizes.)

As the size of the feature that stores your bits shrinks, so does the archival lifetime before something bad happens to one or more of the bits. That holds true for everything from tape, to hard drives, to CDs to flash drives.

about 2 months ago
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How Intel and Micron May Finally Kill the Hard Disk Drive

WuphonsReach Re:Empty article.. (438 comments)

Also incorrect assertion that drives don't go faster than 7200 (there are 15k drives, just they are pointless for most with SSD caching strategies available).

With Enterprise SSD drive prices hitting $1/GB (granted some are still $2-3/GB), the days of 15k RPM drives are definitely numbered. You get 50-100x the IOPS out of SSDs compared to the 15k RPM SAS drives. That means for a given level of IOPS that you need, you can use a lot fewer drives by switching to SSDs.

I'd argue that if you are short-stroking your 15k SAS drives to get increased IOPS out of the array, it's past time to switch to enterprise SSDs.

about 2 months ago
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Sony Pictures Computer Sytems Shut Down After Ransomware Hack

WuphonsReach Re:How do WE fight this? (155 comments)

Using rdiff-backup, rsnapshot or rsync across the LAN via SSH in a "pull" configuration is the safest. The server pulls the files from the client PC. Alternately, you could do the above in a push configuration and limit where the origin PC can write to on the backup server. Even in a "push" configuration, I don't know of any malware currently capable of figuring out that there is an rdiff-backup script which stores data on a different server.

The server then sends files to tape / disk / offsite.

Basically - you need to have a centralized backup solution with multi-generation removable media.

For immediate restores, you pull the files back off the backup server. The next level after that is pulling files off of removable media which has been kept offsite or disconnected.

about 2 months ago

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