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"Magic Helmet" For F-35 Ready For Delivery

Xest Re:Bugs... (182 comments)

The harrier nozzles can't be put into a forward position, they're shielded from the front.

The harrier itself was a 60s aircraft, though like the Skyhawk saw upgrades throughout it's lifetime. Aircraft like the Super Etendard, and Dagger were 70s aircraft.

1 hour ago
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Do Apple and Google Sabotage Older Phones? What the Graphs Don't Show

Xest Re:There's two paths... (233 comments)

Right, I love Android, but the Nexus 7 seems to be the exception. I bought a Nexus 7 and a Samsung Galaxy Nexus at the exact same time, the Nexus 7 does indeed still receive updates, but my Samsung Galaxy Nexus? They stopped supporting that after less than 18 months from it's UK launch, that's the worse service I've seen of any Android provider I've had. Even my HTC Magic got updates for longer than that.

Fact is, even Google can't be trusted to offer updates for a reasonable amount of time - it's not like they were even refusing a major version jump from Android 4 to Android 5, they simply refused to update Galaxy Nexus users from 4.3 to 4.4 after less than 18 months which is utterly pathetic.

It pains me to give Apple fanboys ammunition, because much of what they spout is just plain old FUD, but this is really one area where Google deserves all the flack it gets. The Android update problem has been one of the top complaints since day 1, and 4 - 5 years into it's life Google, rather than deal with the problem, decided to be part of it, so it's really Google's own stupid fault if Android gets flack on this front - the blame can't simply be shifted to other device manufacturers since the day Google decided to be part of the problem itself.

1 hour ago
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"Magic Helmet" For F-35 Ready For Delivery

Xest Re:Bugs... (182 comments)

Every new aircraft gets slated to hell though, people were saying the harrier jump jet was useless for similar reasons. The idea of a VTOL aircraft useful in both air to air and air to ground was an impossible ineffective pipe dream according to many.

Yet it's still in use by the US now and has seen more combat than most other jets having been engaged in everything from the Falklands, to Iraq (both times) to Afghanistan.

You only really know how great an aircraft is when it's tried and tested in combat, everything up until that point is hearsay. Many predicted the UK would get slaughtered trying to take the Falklands back because sending a carrier with the laughing stock in some circles which was the Harrier onboard meant they'd get destroyed from the air, yet when it came to the Harrier ended up proving it's worth in defence of the fleet taking on some at the time perfectly capable Argentinian aircraft like French supplied Mirages and Super Etendards, US supplied Skyhawks, and Israeli supplied Daggers. The naysayers were proven wrong, and the harrier was proven an aircraft that was extremely effective and is still so right up until this very day where it's still active in Afghanistan.

The harrier isn't alone in this story, many other aircraft have been through the exact same thing of being slagged off as worthless only to turn out extremely effective. I think even some of the UK's iconic and most successful World War II aircraft even had their vocal doubters early on.

3 days ago
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For Now, UK Online Pirates Will Get 4 Warnings -- And That's It

Xest Re:Except... (143 comments)

Don't say "ask another lawyer" when you're clearly not a lawyer. I don't know what you're on about mentioning the UK is based on common law not constitutional law, yes, well done, so what, what was the insertion of that random factoid about exactly? Do you feel that if you add in random quotations about different law in different jurisdictions that that somehow adds weight to your argument on this particular case? It really doesn't, it looks like a really really poor attempt at misdirection.

Criminal copyright infringement isn't about receiving a benefit, it's about seeking to profit, directly or indirectly. You keep trying to avoid the word profit and switch to things like "benefit" but like it or not, UK copyright law revolves around profiting, which is subtly different to benefiting.

But enough of your nonsense, enough of your "go ask another lawyer", he's what the IPO, the UK's intellectual property office, the organisation that oversees IP has to say about it:

"Deliberate infringement of copyright on a commercial scale may be a criminal offence. Please see further information on What is IP crime? and the additional remedies which may be available."

http://www.ipo.gov.uk/copy/c-o...

Personal sharing no matter to how many people isn't by definition commercial in nature and so cannot be of commercial scale, and that's before you even question how you might prove someone using BitTorrent is deliberately distributing something, most users don't even know it uploads too, they think they're just downloading anyway so proving deliberate infringement in itself would make it an impossible criminal prosecution.

If you want to continue to argue otherwise rather than pretending to be a lawyer, which you're clearly not, please provide me one single case where someone has been hit with a successful criminal prosecution for personal sharing.

No? couldn't find one? gee, I wonder why that might be? I'll give you a hint: it's because you're still completely wrong, as much as you refuse to admit it. The police do not even pursue personal file sharing precisely because it is not criminal.

Of course if you're still adamant that you want to keep digging I guess I could do as you say and ask a lawyer too (but again, not "another" lawyer, because again, you're clearly not one despite your implication), and they might say something like:

"It is also possible for a person to face criminal prosecution for copyright infringement, but the copyright statutes in the UK in effect limit the offence to the large-scale distribution of pirated material for financial gain."

http://www.findlaw.co.uk/law/c...

So are you going to stop digging now or is this enough information for you to now be able to accept that you had no idea what you were on about?

3 days ago
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The Daily Harassment of Women In the Game Industry

Xest Re:Pft (956 comments)

Not really, some are backed by explicit laws targeting that specific issue, but also backed by strict enforcement. For example, race discrimination is strongly enforced. Employers actively try and prevent it because they know there is a strong cost to it.

The same isn't true of discrimination against men and what they wear in the workplace, there isn't any active engagement against it and there isn't even a strong societal backing against it and so it goes under the radar, because employers know that no one is going to haul them into court for it and that it's not something they're going to suffer reputational damage on because everyone is doing it.

Or to put it another way, as I pointed out the laws on discrimination have zero impact on this particular issue - their existence is largely irrelevant to the problem, compared to issues such as racism or sexism in favour of women where they have a much greater impact and are much more actively enforced.

3 days ago
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The Daily Harassment of Women In the Game Industry

Xest Re:Pft (956 comments)

And become a pariah amongst the directors?

Without explicit legislation to make it clear to employers I don't really see how a more general law on discrimination, that is never actually used to protect males in the UK is going to do anything to change societal attitudes. Certainly I've seen companies change their behaviour in general and allow casual dress all around, but I've never seen a company do it on the basis of discrimination law, nor am I necessarily even sure they would win the case. Is it discrimination? sure, but how many successful discrimination cases have there been about males being discriminated against over females? Fathers for justice would've been out of business years ago if the general discrimination laws actually protected males in this manner in practice, they really don't, nor do they seem intended to given the lack of will to make sure that they do.

3 days ago
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The Daily Harassment of Women In the Game Industry

Xest Re:Pft (956 comments)

"Having said that I find that they are generally well balanced and fair in my country, and apply equally to both genders. I have benefited from them, and I'm male (e.g. I now get the same relaxed dress code as women do)."

I thought you lived in the UK too? I've certainly seen no such benefit from law changes. Many of us males still have to wear shirts and suit trousers and often a tie at minimum, whilst women come in wearing whatever they really want to wear as long as it isn't casual to the point of ripped jeans or whatever.

I suspect if you've seen benefit in being able to dress down it's just a company policy. I've not seen any evidence of legally enforced change on that front.

3 days ago
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'Just Let Me Code!'

Xest Re:Who is stopping him? (367 comments)

Nonsense, you're just a classic case of "I never really bothered to learn a proper agile process, I just guessed a bit at it and went on a bit of hearsay and it all went wrong".

Agile has it's place, and it can drastically improve some forms of development. I don't think any Agile processes declare that you should just start writing code without any idea of what you're writing. SCRUM for example encourages use of a feature list known as the product backlog (i.e. list of things we'd like to do) which you then work through in two week sprints. You can setup a burn down chart where you log each item as it's ticked off and build a chart from it that predicts the finish time of the project based on what's remaining in the current backlog.

This means that when someone comes along and says "I want to add this feature in" they can do exactly that, but the point the burn down chart intersects with "features remaining" extends off into the future a bit further so that they have instant rough visibility of the impact of their request to change.

Your understanding of Agile is exactly backwards, it doesn't make things worse, it makes things better by aiding visibility of impact of change and by allowing you to keep control of costs - if that chart looks like it's tending off too far into the future, you can just cut the project short and accept that the lowest priority features will be axed as a result but that at least there will be no cost overrun.

You shouldn't really be re-writing anything much if you develop code competently in a modular manner, but if you do, at least the person demanding the re-write gets to see what other features will be cut, or how much more time and cost there will be from their actions when you use something like SCRUM.

Am I saying Agile is the be all and end all saviour? Not at all, I think SCRUM works poorly for smaller scale projects - a SCRUM team should supposedly be between 5 and 9 people whereas an awful lot of the world's software is still built with only say 1 to 3 developers. I also think most Agile zealots themselves have no idea what they're doing but are mostly just blaggers screaming "Hey, let's all be a bunch of cool hipsters and have stand up meetings randomly and not getting anything actually useful done just because!" but that doesn't mean it's an inherently bad tool overall and if used properly. There are still a lot of large successful businesses and software houses that do quietly just get on with using it properly for what it's worth and who are better off for it.

Agile's biggest problem is this assumption that it's a thing you can just start doing with no understanding or training, that's completely nonsense. Like everything else it's a change that has to be phased in a sensible manner by people who actually understand it. Too many people just try and implement it with about as much clue about it as you've shown just so they too can feel cool by jumping on the bandwagon and say they use Agile and then it fails spectacularly as a result but doing it this way is a bit like sticking someone with zero fighter experience into a fighter jet and watching them brag about how they're going to do a "4g inverted dive with another aircraft" because they saw Tom Cruise do it on TopGun and think they want to be cool like him. It isn't going to end well, it's going to fail spectacularly, though just like Tom Cruise, they will if nothing else be an absolute twat.

3 days ago
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'Just Let Me Code!'

Xest Re:Code the way you want... (367 comments)

Don't really agree, I often use the same languages at home as work and I prefer it that way because I'm more productive due to being intimately familiar with the technologies in question.

Most the work I've done in the last year has been C#, and I've been using it at home also. I'm much better off working like this than using say C++ for game development in my spare time because I can simply get more done. As an indie I'm not writing the latest and greatest FPS so C# with things like Unity, MonoGame and so forth are more than adequate for what I need and also the best option because there's nothing that'll get me up and doing what I want to do any faster. Sure I could use Java and OpenGL, or C++ and OpenGL or DirectX but I want to actually write games, not write engines.

I don't see what using a different language would get me, other than less productivity. I simply use the right tool for the job and if the job is getting game development done then why wouldn't I use the same language as at work?

It seems pointless to artificially cripple yourself by excluding a potentially superior tool for the task at hand just because it's also what you use at work.

I don't really know what you mean by "more easily separate them", I find it easy to know when I'm sat at home rather than in the office, and I find it easy to tell that I'm doing game development rather than business development so I don't see what difference a language change would possibly make. But then, I'm also not sure what you mean by "can the language hate, it's fine for small projects". It's also fine for extremely large projects, so I don't really know where you're coming from there.

But perhaps I've been developing long enough and have used enough different languages over the years (C, C++, Java, C#, PHP, and Javascript for example) that simply using a different language for the sake of it isn't really something that particularly excites me anymore. I just want to get things done using the best option possible after weighing up all the options available, and if that's the same as the language I'm currently using at work then so be it, and so what? The only reason I'd switch language is because it's either a better option, or because my goal is explicitly to learn or brush up on that language.

To me the language is a triviality, it's such an irrelevance in the grand scheme of things, it's the design, the problem solving, and the end product that make the difference that keeps me interested in my spare time, I couldn't care less what it is written in, the language is just a small implementation detail, an important initial thing to decide upon, but small in practice once the decision is made. Getting caught up on language and library details is the antithesis of being a productive programmer - you shouldn't be thinking about the language or the libraries at all, the language should just flow from your fingers naturally without thought. It's the problem solving that should be taking up all of your thoughts so I'd wager if you're getting caught up on language details to even notice that you're using the same language as at work or not and that that in some way frustrates you then you may well lack familiarity with the language, its tools, and its libraries more so than you're willing to accept. Switching to something different again will only prolong the time with which it takes you to acquire that necessary familiarity to be productive.

4 days ago
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For Now, UK Online Pirates Will Get 4 Warnings -- And That's It

Xest Re:Except... (143 comments)

However you may and wish to try and twist the argument to cover up your misunderstanding that's still not what is deemed in law to be criminal infringement because it's still not commercial activity.

You may dislike the word profit but that's generally the key factor, the only exceptions are if you're say doing it to encourage your business to grow in other areas - i.e. you can have this "free" illegal copy if you buy something else from us.

Using BitTorrent in a personal capacity is by definition not a commercial activity.

4 days ago
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UK Users Overwhelmingly Spurn Broadband Filters

Xest Re:More inconvienient than the average filter. (115 comments)

What laws are broken exactly? I used to work in schools, granted it was some years back now but there was never any such law that said you had to keep children safe, mostly it was just parents/teachers who had no idea what they were doing or how well these things work.

A friend who is still currently a teacher also tells me he's not aware of any laws mandating filters at schools and in fact the advice he's been given by his local teaching advisory service is to start focussing more on educating kids precisely because the feedback from teachers has been that the filters are ineffective.

Just because we got by without computers before Google images doesn't mean that's okay. We also got by without fire, and medicine but it doesn't change the fact we're better off with these things. It's called human advancement. It's kind of a big deal, especially in education.

4 days ago
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UK Users Overwhelmingly Spurn Broadband Filters

Xest Re:It's mostly a nuisance (115 comments)

What'd be interesting therefore is to know how many of the few percent who opted in later opted out after finding what a nuisance it was. These figures only refer to those who initially opted in and say nothing about whether they stuck with it.

Number of people continuing to use it will likely be even lower again.

4 days ago
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For Now, UK Online Pirates Will Get 4 Warnings -- And That's It

Xest Re:Except... (143 comments)

No, only when there is a profit motive in supplying does it become a criminal case. If you're supplying without charging it's still very much a civil case.

5 days ago
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For Now, UK Online Pirates Will Get 4 Warnings -- And That's It

Xest Re:Warnings are discoverable ... (143 comments)

Well, it's not for free. The industry is paying ISPs £750,000 one off + £75,000 per year. The ISPs have to pay £250,000 towards it and £25,000 per year.

I'd be amazed if they even ever see a return on that investment. As someone else pointed out in the UK you don't get the absurd escalation of penalty costs in court that you do in the US, you actually have to prove damages and only get actual damages. Even if they do litigate that amount they'll gain from doing so would be so small it wouldn't cover the cost of staff time in collating the information to be sent to the lawyers, even if the lawyers fees themselves were covered.

I really don't think this will achieve anything other than getting a few kids told off by their parents.

5 days ago
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Why My LG Optimus Cellphone Is Worse Than It's Supposed To Be

Xest Re:Isn't this Apple's entire shtick ? (290 comments)

But that's exactly the point isn't it? The assumption that software magically "just works" when you move it on to shittier hardware is complete nonsense. That's never been the case, not even on the desktop.

When you buy cheap you're not just buying cheaper hardware, you're buying a more cheaply QA'd phone, you're buying a less tested phone, you're buying a phone that has had less investment in bug fixing. Your analogy of Intel's i series is completely off base as it's not simply the process version that changes - everything from the wireless chip, to the screen size, to the quality of memory, to the amount of storage space, to the graphics processor will also often change. All that can make stuff that works on high end devices just fine fail miserably on low end devices.

It's all part of the package - the idea that it's cheap but the software should be just as great is complete bollocks. Software has a cost too, and just as you pay for better hardware quality and assurance by upping the amount you spend you also pay for better software quality and assurance by upping the amount you spend.

about a week ago
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Why My LG Optimus Cellphone Is Worse Than It's Supposed To Be

Xest Re:Isn't this Apple's entire shtick ? (290 comments)

Right and it's the same with equivalent cost Android phones too, but the problem here is that he's bought a cheap crappy device and decided to complain that it's cheap and crappy.

He wants iPhone/High end Android quality at budget Android price, which is stupid.

about a week ago

Submissions

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Man jailed for trolling

Xest Xest writes  |  more than 2 years ago

Xest (935314) writes "A man in the UK has been jailed for just over 4 months for trolling, and has also been given an order banning him from using social networking sites for 5 years. The trolling in question involved insulting a person who committed suicide by jumping in front a train by posting offensive remarks on a page dedicated to her memory, and creating a YouTube parody of Thomas the Tank with the deceased girls face in place of Thomas'.

Is it about time trolling to this extent saw this kind of punishment, or is this punishment simply too harsh for someone who perhaps didn't realise how seriously his actions would be taken by the authorities?"

Link to Original Source
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Android takes 2nd place for the quarter

Xest Xest writes  |  more than 3 years ago

Xest (935314) writes "For the quarter July, August, September Android has now pushed into second place for handset sales accounting for 25% of all phones sold, with Apple taking 3rd place and RIM taking 4th. Symbian is of course still king, largely due to it's massive userbase of low end phones in places like Africa, India, and China where handsets such as the iPhone and high end Android devices are simply unaffordable to many. The article notes that sales by smaller handset manufacturers such as HTC, Huwaei, and ZTE who often develop phones on behalf of other companies to brand themselves now account for a third of phone sales. With devices like the Orange San Francisco developed by ZTE selling at £99 without a contract and sporting an AMOLED screen whilst also being able to run some of the most popular games and applications today such as Angry Birds, perhaps even Symbian will see itself displaced over the next few years to be replaced with some of the highly competitive Android devices beginning to trickle out."
Link to Original Source
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A brighter future for freedom in Britain?

Xest Xest writes  |  more than 4 years ago

Xest (935314) writes "Over the last decade on Slashdot since the events of 9/11 we have constantly been bombarded with stories reporting the continued deterioration of freedom and civil liberties in the West as governments come up with their new latest and greatest scheme to track down terrorists and criminals however negative the effect is on the rest of the law abiding population.

Today, Nick Clegg, the deputy prime minister of Britain's new coalition government who came to power just last week outlined the new government's vision for the future of British civil liberties. The government has so far confirmation that they will be abolishing Britain's ID card database, abolishing the National Identity Register, abolishing the ContactPoint database, look into reforming libel laws to protect freedom of speech, will be restoring protections for the right to peaceful protest, and will improve the fairness of the DNA database to ensure innocent people's DNA is no longer held on it. This all begs the question; is the tide finally turning against deterioration of our rights and freedom?

The results of this rhetoric are yet to be seen, but if they are sincere in their aims, and truly even wish to allow citizens to recommend laws for removal as stated, then might we perhaps even see the dreadful Digital Economy Act repealed? Right now it's too early to tell, but a positive vibe on civil liberties from people now in power is often news in itself when taken in the context of the last decade of mostly doom and gloom for civil liberties and freedom."

Link to Original Source
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PS3 plagued by similar problems to the XBox 360s i

Xest Xest writes  |  more than 4 years ago

Xest writes "More and more reports are appearing of Playstation 3 consoles failing in a similar way that the earlier models of the XBox 360 did, except for Sony, it's the Yellow Light of Dead. The BBC has an interesting article, which suggests the problem could be almost identical to that which caused the earlier XBox 360 models to fail — poor soldering connections. From the article:

"Several of those businesses have told Watchdog that the vast majority of consoles they see with the "yellow light of death" can be repaired by heating up specific parts of the circuit board. This process is called solder re-flow. By heating the connections between the components and the circuit board to temperatures in excess of 200 Celsius, the metal solder joints melt, just like they did when the device was first assembled. Console repairers say that this process method is commonly used to repair fractured connections, or dry joints."

But it's not the only rule from Microsoft's playbook on the issue that Sony have been following, whilst they have admitted 12,500 out of 2.5million (a convenient 0.5%) of systems have failed, they refuse to release full figures of failure rates citing them as being commercially sensitive. Unfortunately one rule Sony does not appear to be following Microsoft on is an extended warranty, stating that if it fails after 12 months, it is not their problem. In the UK however at least, the Sale of Goods act would disagree with that statement."

Link to Original Source
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Microsoft announces "YouTube for Games"

Xest Xest writes  |  more than 6 years ago

Xest (935314) writes "At this years Game Developers Conference, alongside the announcement of Gears of War 2 due for release this November, Microsoft have announced another interesting feature — homebrew game sharing. Utilising XNA, developers and gamers will be able to share games that they have created over XBox live and rate them in a similar manner to YouTube's video sharing service. Microsoft have released 7 games to showcase the capabilities of the service at the event.

If this idea is extended to Windows users through Microsoft's Live for Windows program and with XNA Game Studio being a nice environment for amateur and professional game developers alike this could provide a powerful new path to mainstream users for indie game developers."

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