Beta
×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

Comments

top

Mangalyaan Successfully Put Into Mars Orbit

YA_Python_dev Re:Standing on the Shoulders of Giants (173 comments)

BTW, both the article and the summary are wrong: Europe too succeeded in their first attempt, with Mars Express in 2003.

about a week ago
top

Nasty Business: How To Drain Competitors' Google AdWords Budgets

YA_Python_dev Re:Geotarget your AdWords (97 comments)

You know, right, that you can set a daily budget limit in AdWords and Google won't go over it?

about 2 months ago
top

Wikipedia Editors Hit With $10 Million Defamation Suit

YA_Python_dev Articles about Catholicism are even worse (268 comments)

Especially in the Italian Wikipedia pretty much any article about the catholic church is written from the point of view of someone that believes in that religion. Edits that try to follow the NPOV (neutral point of view) rule are immediately reverted, any negative information, even when well-referenced, is deleted or hidden in a brief mention inside a long paragraph at the end of an article.

Unfortunately the people that keep these articles in such bad state seem to have far more free time than the volunteers that want to improve them following the rules, so wikipedia's gradual improvement model fails for these articles about religion.

about 3 months ago
top

Google Unveils Self-Driving Car With No Steering Wheel

YA_Python_dev Re:No thanks (583 comments)

No thanks, wouldn't want a car that I can't manually override when shit happens.

Dude, if you want to drive a car manually you are the shit that will happen to other people on the road.

about 4 months ago
top

PHK: HTTP 2.0 Should Be Scrapped

YA_Python_dev Re:If you are a programmer and have a Wikipedia pa (220 comments)

Ah, the irony of using "security and privacy" to argue in favour of old unencrypted HTTP/1.1 and against always-encrypted SPDY (which HTTP/2.0 is based on).

about 4 months ago
top

21 Financial Sites Found To Store Sensitive Data In Browser Disk Cache

YA_Python_dev This is actually a very bad idea, if true (118 comments)

This actually decreases security. Browser caching is strictly necessary to make the web work fast, disabling it for HTTPS means discouraging websites from using secure connections for anything where it's not strictly necessary (like money). And $DEITY knows we live in a world where every website should be secure by default. You wouldn't use telnet even for a completely non-sensitive server, so why accept unencrypted HTTP to post on slashdot or anywhere else?

about a year ago
top

21 Financial Sites Found To Store Sensitive Data In Browser Disk Cache

YA_Python_dev Re:Scaremongering (118 comments)

A shared computer should not let users see other users' private files (and browser caches are most definitely not world-readable). This is what happens with Android multi-login, Chrome OS and traditional Linux distros. I'm fairly certain the same is also true for Windows and Mac OS X.

If I temporarily let someone use my computer with my account, I sure as hell keep an eye on what they are doing, because the thing contains stuff about me that's much more sensitive than anything that paypal or my bank will ever know.

about a year ago
top

21 Financial Sites Found To Store Sensitive Data In Browser Disk Cache

YA_Python_dev Scaremongering (118 comments)

This is BS. If an attacker has access to your files in your local disk, they have already won.

about a year ago
top

Google Releases Glass Kernel Source Code

YA_Python_dev It wasn't "rooted" (205 comments)

"Rooting" means exploiting a security flaw to get root privileges in a device that is designed to prevent users from doing that (e.g. the iPhone or the Android phones sold by some US network operators).

Bootloader unlocking and root access was available and well documented on the first Android device designed by Google (the Nexus One), simply by running the command "fastboot oem unlock".

The same command worked on the second Android phone by Google, the Nexus S, and all subsequent devices, including tablets: Galaxy Nexus, Nexus 4, Nexus 7 and Nexus 10. Unsurprisingly it also works on Glass.

It's just a well know feature of all the devices created by Google. Details: https://plus.google.com/112413860260589530492/posts/jYHhKHYwUJ2.

Google's documentation on how to "root" your Android devices: http://source.android.com/source/building-devices.html.

about a year and a half ago
top

Google Launches 'Keep' To Rival Evernote

YA_Python_dev Google doesn't sell your data (205 comments)

Google is one of the few big "social" companies around that never resell users' data to any third party. Read those big legal blobs before clicking "I accept".

about a year and a half ago
top

Microsoft, Partners Probed Over Bribery Claims

YA_Python_dev How things work in Italy (137 comments)

In Italy, like the rest of the EU, public money must usually be spent through transparent public contracts awarded to the lowest bidder that satisfies all requirements.

To make sure that Linux or LibreOffice don't cause problems the trick is very simple: they put e.g. "Windows 7" or "Microsoft Office 2010" in the requirements and pretend to have open competitive bids by comparing offers from different resellers for Microsoft software.

Another common trick is to let the situation degenerate until it becomes an emergency. At that point the law allows contracts to be awarded directly to a company arbitrarly chosen by a politician. This explains "emergencies" that last decades like the garbages crisis in Naples.

about a year and a half ago
top

Company Turns Your Android Smartphone Into a Game Console

YA_Python_dev Games compatibility? (126 comments)

How many games support it? Unless it has wide support it's just not worth it.

about 2 years ago
top

The Linux-Proof Processor That Nobody Wants

YA_Python_dev Re:Blast in time (403 comments)

Jazelle has been gone for years. None of the Cortex series include it. It gave worse performance to a modern JIT, but in a lower memory footprint. It's only useful when you want to run Java apps in 4MB of RAM.

Are you sure? ARM advertises it as part of all architectures from ARMv5 to ARMv8: http://www.arm.com/files/downloads/ARMv8_Architecture.pdf.

about 2 years ago
top

The Linux-Proof Processor That Nobody Wants

YA_Python_dev ARM is not RISC and x86-64 is not CISC (403 comments)

Getting back on topic: the last ARM architecture, ARMv8, is far from what was called "RISC" back in the '70s. E.g. it can run instructions of different sizes (16 vs 32 bit), it has 4 specialized instructions for AES, registers with different sizes (32, 64 and 128 bits), instructions for running a subset of the Java bytecode, a rich set of SIMD operations and specialized instructions for SHA-1 and SHA-256.

Similarily the architecture supported by the new Atom chips (which is AMD64/x86-64 BTW, IA32 is only present for backward compatibility) is almost universally run on RISC-like processors that have instruction translators. Considering that the increased density of the x86-64 instructions usually allows to save more cache transistors than the ones required for decoding the instructions themselves, I think that the power consumption differences that we see are more due to the implementation and different traditional focus areas of ARM vs Intel/AMD than inherent differences in the instruction sets.

about 2 years ago
top

HTML5 Splits Into Two Standards

YA_Python_dev Re:HTML 4.01 button for browser (395 comments)

You seem to think that HTML 4.01 is a subset of the HTML (a.k.a. "the standard formerly known as HTML5"). That's not the case, HTML 4.01 is a completely different and incompatible HTML dialect. When I say incompatible I mean that 4.01-compliant browsers (which obviously don't exist and never did) would not be able to correctly display ANY of the following website: slashdot, Wikipedia, Google, Yahoo, BBC, CNN, eBay, Amazon, Facebook, Twitter, YouTube and many, many others. If you want an HTML 4.01 browser, you can't just limit existing browsers to a subset of their functionality, you have to write one yourself because 4.01 was so utterly broken and incompatible with the actual web that exists in this reality that no browser vendor ever implemented it. Even lynx is more similar to HTML than to HTML 4.01 when it comes to parsing web pages, otherwise it would be completely unusable. HTML 4.01 was promoted to a "standard" only because the W3C rules at the time were very lax, with the current rules that require two independent complete implementations, it would still be a "working draft".

more than 2 years ago
top

HTML5 Splits Into Two Standards

YA_Python_dev Quite the opposite (395 comments)

The web browser interoperability in the last few years (after IE6) is a product of the WHATWG standard, that started in 2004 (it wasn't called HTML back then). Just an example: HTML 4.01 doesn't specify a way to parse HTML that actually works and doesn't specify at all how to handle errors. The result is that every browser had a slightly different and incompatible parsing algorithm. Let me make this clear: no browser ever implemented HTML 4.01. Not a single one of them. Because HTML 4.01 was extremely buggy and unmaintained. It caused the IE6 era. The HTML5 draft on W3C is less buggy but still severely incomplete, stopping making major changes just means that all browsers vendors are completely ignoring the HTML5 from W3C and going instead for the HTML standard that's actively maintained and updated.

more than 2 years ago
top

HTML5 Splits Into Two Standards

YA_Python_dev Back on topic, the editor of both docs wrote this: (395 comments)

Ian Hickson is the editor of both docs (he's actually the editor of the main HTML standard, the WHATWG one; the draft hosted by the W3C is really nothing more that an old and incomplete copy that nobody among browser vendors takes seriously).

He explained very clearly the past and current situation: http://lists.w3.org/Archives/Public/public-whatwg-archive/2012Jul/0119.html

And, yes, the WHATWG has done an excellent job so far, bringing much needed features to the web and creating an era of faster and more interoperable browsers. If they had just waited for the W3C we would still be stuck with HTML 4.01, IE6, Flash and other plugins.

Also this is not a new development, HTML (from WHATWG) has started gradually leaving the HTML5 (from W3C) behind a long time ago. Where the two differ, all major browsers (including IE) either already follow HTML or plan to. See this post from more than a year ago: http://blog.whatwg.org/html-is-the-new-html5

When people talk about HTML5 features in browsers and websites, they actually refer to the HTML standard. The HTML5 "working draft" on the W3C website doesn't even support the old 2D canvas API, which is implemented by all browsers!

more than 2 years ago
top

UK ISP Asks Religious Groups To Set Parental Controls

YA_Python_dev They tried with an atheist... (205 comments)

They tried with an atheist but she left the blacklist empty.

more than 2 years ago

Submissions

top

Theora 1.0 released, supported by Firefox

YA_Python_dev YA_Python_dev writes  |  more than 5 years ago

YA_Python_dev (885173) writes "The Xiph.Org Foundation announced today the release of Theora 1.0. Theora is a free/open source video codec with a small CPU footprint that offers easy portability and requires no patent royalties. Upcoming versions of Firefox and Opera will play natively Ogg/Theora videos with the new HTML5 element <video src="file.ogv"></video>, and ffmpeg2theora offers an easy way to create content. Theora developers are already working on a 1.1 encoder that offers better quality/bitrate ratio, while producing streams backward-compatible with the current decoder."
top

Jython 2.2 (Python implemented in Java) released!

YA_Python_dev YA_Python_dev writes  |  more than 7 years ago

YA_Python_dev (885173) writes "After nearly six years of development a new production release of Jython has been released. Jython 2.2 is a portable Java implementation of the Python programming language. The extensive unit tests shared between all the Python implementations confirm that it includes all the CPython 2.2 features (except a few library modules); it also has better Java integration and even a number of CPython 2.3 features! See the release notes for more details. The next version of Jython is expected to entirely skip 2.3/2.4 and shot directly for Python 2.5 compatibility, in the meantime download the cross-platform Jython 2.2 installer and start playing with it, report bugs and submit patches!
P.S.: the first alpha of CPython 3.0 will be released in a few days, with a crapload of small and big enhancements. Apparently Guido is still trying to create the best general-purpose programming language in the world."

Journals

top

Jython 2.2 (Python implemented in Java) released!

YA_Python_dev YA_Python_dev writes  |  more than 7 years ago After nearly six years of development a new production release of Jython has been released. Jython 2.2 is a portable Java implementation of the Python programming language. The extensive unit tests shared between all the Python implementations confirm that it includes all the CPython 2.2 features (except a few library modules); it also has better Java integration and even a number of CPython 2.3 features! See the release notes for more details. The next version of Jython is expected to entirely skip 2.3/2.4 and shot directly for Python 2.5 compatibility, in the meantime download the cross-platform Jython 2.2 installer and start playing with it, report bugs and submit patches!
P.S.: the first alpha of CPython 3.0 will be released in a few days, with a crapload of small and big enhancements. Apparently Guido is still trying to create the best general-purpose programming language in the world.

top

Wikipedia screws up its students at Google Summer of Code

YA_Python_dev YA_Python_dev writes  |  more than 7 years ago

This year's students for Google Summer of Code have been selected and assigned to one of the 137 partecipating organizations or free software projects. To all of them except the Wikimedia Foundation, which asked to partecipate and was accepted and assigned five student slots by Google. But Wikimedia then failed (despited repeated warnings from Google) to assign mentors to any of their students, so the only ones of them that have been accepted are the ones that also applied for other organizations.

Google has redistributed the Wikimedia student slots to other, more responsive, projects: they have been extra-generous this year and have accepted 904 students from all the world, investing more than 4,500,000 US$ in free software. Congratulations to all the students accepted and thanks to the students that were not: try again next year!

Slashdot Login

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?