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Comments

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FCC Warned Not To Take Actions a Republican-Led FCC Would Dislike

Zordak Re:In other words... (331 comments)

The Supremacy Clause does not trump Article 1, Section 8 where the powers of the federal government are specifically enumerated, or the Bill of Rights, which was passed to capture the votes of anti-federalists who feared that the new government would get too powerful if there were not explicit checks placed on its power. Seriously, just read even the Wikipedia article on the Tenth Amendment. This is not some novel, controversial issue to people who have a clue what they're talking about.

9 hours ago
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FCC Warned Not To Take Actions a Republican-Led FCC Would Dislike

Zordak Re:In other words... (331 comments)

You have no idea what you're talking about. Yes, the Constitution was supposed to be stronger than the Articles of Confederation. That is not synonymous with unlimited and all-powerful.

9 hours ago
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FCC Warned Not To Take Actions a Republican-Led FCC Would Dislike

Zordak Re:In other words... (331 comments)

You'd fail law school. 10th amendment is an throw away amendment that holds no legal meaning or legal standard. It's used today to galvanize the states rights / confederate base but there is no sound legal jurisprudence that has ever been accepted by the Supreme Court.

I have a JD and a Texas bar card that say otherwise.

9 hours ago
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FCC Warned Not To Take Actions a Republican-Led FCC Would Dislike

Zordak Re:In other words... (331 comments)

You're thinking of the Articles of Confederacy, which preceded the Constitution. Study your history.

No, you're thinking of some government that you just made up. Go read the Constitution, especially the 10th Amendment. The states wanted to make it very clear that they were giving the federal government only specific, enumerated powers. Then FDR told the court where it could stick its Constitution (as the GP said) and told them that if they didn't back down, he would stack the court with yes-men who would give him his way. The court backed down, and the result was 75 years of the federal government encroaching into everyday life until you couldn't buy a shower head without Uncle Sam's permission, and people like you who don't even realize anymore that it was supposed to be a government of specific, enumerated powers.

yesterday
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Scientists Developing Remote-Control Cyborg Moths

Zordak Mothra (27 comments)

This will obviously ultimately lead to Mothra, which will be aswesome, especially if these guys also figure out how to build Godzilla so they can have an epic battle to the death that wrecks a scale model of Tokyo.

yesterday
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Selectable Ethics For Robotic Cars and the Possibility of a Robot Car Bomb

Zordak Re:Will not matter. (239 comments)

Those mistakes will lead to lawsuits. You were injured when a vehicle manufactured by "Artificially Intelligent Motors, inc (AIM, inc)" hit you by "choice". That "choice" was programmed into that vehicle at the demand of "AIM, inc" management. So no. No company would take that risk. And anyone stupid enough to try would not write perfect code and would be sued out of existence after their first patch.

What will happen is that the manufacturers will lobby for a statutory "safe harbor." The legislature will make the ethical decisions in advance, or provide a menu of "safe" ethical options. And the manufacturer will be statutorily immune from lawsuits as long as they have followed those safe harbor guidelines. This is a good thing in theory, as it permits the technology to progress, where lawsuits would otherwise eliminate it. So don't worry about the manufacturers. What you should worry about is that those clowns in Washington, D.C.* will be selling off their "ethics" decisions under the table in exchange for cushy corner-office jobs with AIM, Inc. after they retire from public office.

*Yes, it will inevitably be a federal law, though just as inevitably, California will have some granola-munching variant that requires autonomous cars operating in California to place a super-premium on the lives of endangered salamanders or something.

4 days ago
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Is the App Store Broken?

Zordak Re:economy bullshit argument (258 comments)

Apple users are not the kind of people who drive to a different supermarket because the tomatoes are 5 cents cheaper there.

Exactly. They're the type of people who always shop at the same supermarket, where the tomatoes cost twice as much as anywhere else and have a glossy wax coating, are all the same, approved size, and are utterly free of any flavor. In fact, they don't even know how to cook, and don't know why they're buying tomatoes in the first place, except that the reanimated corpse of Steve Jobs told them to. They buy their precious, shiny iTomatoes and dutifully display them in the crispers of their iRefrigerators. Then a week later, they toss them out and go back to the iGroceryStore and buy the new, upgraded iTomato 5S, with even more shiny and even less flavor.

about three weeks ago
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Experiment Shows People Exposed To East German Socialism Cheat More

Zordak Re:let me correct that for you. (619 comments)

You consider a world where nobody has to work as a utopia. My observation is just the opposite. If you take effort away from people, they tend to become entitled, lazy, selfish, and (ironically, with more leisure time) miserable.

Where are you getting this from? I detect a very basic failure to either apply critical thinking or reading comprehension.

From your constant insistence, over multiple comments, that under your proposed system nobody would "have" to work. I consider it a privilege to be able to work to provide for myself and my family, not a burden to be cast off at the first opportunity. My ideal world is one where everybody has the ability and opportunity to work for a living wage, not one where everybody gets free stuff.

about a month ago
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Experiment Shows People Exposed To East German Socialism Cheat More

Zordak Re:let me correct that for you. (619 comments)

As a matter of strict values, I share your vision of a world where nobody goes hungry or cold. But I strongly disagree with your path to getting there. You consider a world where nobody has to work as a utopia. My observation is just the opposite. If you take effort away from people, they tend to become entitled, lazy, selfish, and (ironically, with more leisure time) miserable. They may have enough to eat, but they lose so much of their humanity that they become less excellent as people. There is intrinsic value to hard work. In my experience, people who work hard (up to a certain limit) are happier. A society of bored people is one where crime is rampant and people are full of envy and strife (because nothing begets envy like a sense of entitlement). And that's not even to mention practical issues, like the inflation that dogs basic income economies.

My "utopia" is one where everybody works hard when they're working. When they're not working, ideally, they're building strong nuclear and extended families, raising children with a strong work ethic, and teaching them that when they are able, they should help those whose efforts have been less fruitful than their own. That help involves, for example, helping people through tough times, or giving them a lift while they do something to improve themselves like get an education or start a business. The end goal is always for everybody to get to a point where they can support themselves by their own efforts, so that nobody is dependent on government largess (as opposed to everybody). In fact, government hardly enters into it, except for providing some basic infrastructure and emergency services.

Perhaps that society is not possible in our present human condition, but it is an ideal I would sooner seek after than one where an over-powerful central government deals with poverty by subsidizing laziness.

about a month ago
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FBI Concerned About Criminals Using Driverless Cars

Zordak Re:don't drive with nobody in it? (435 comments)

I think the more eminent threat is that automated cars are going to result in lots of sex happening on the road.

Sex is a lot more comfortable on a soft, roomy bed. And I don't want my car to smell like bodily fluids. I'm going to spend the time reading.

about a month ago
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Court Rejects Fox's Attempt to Use Aereo Ruling Against Dish's Hopper

Zordak Re:Study first, then appeal (67 comments)

Essentially the judge points out that a different case requires a different trial. This also means more arguments to study for appealing the Aereo ruling. If Dish's lawyers poke holes in Fox's arguments that led to the Aereo ruling, those arguments are fair game for Aereo's lawyers to use if they're applicable.

I think you misunderstand the "Supreme" part of the "Supreme Court," and the legal doctrine of res judicata.

about a month ago
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Police Recording Confirms NYPD Flew At a Drone and Never Feared Crashing

Zordak Re:Yay big government! (310 comments)

You seem to make it an either/or proposition. You can have laws that prevent these kinds of abuses without having huge regulatory bodies that just end up being the lapdogs of the "regulated" industry.

about a month and a half ago
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Police Recording Confirms NYPD Flew At a Drone and Never Feared Crashing

Zordak Re:Yay big government! (310 comments)

This is the other kneejerk response to any suggestion of reduced government spending that needs to die forever.

1 - How about we cut government spending in some are other than the tiny percentage spent on protecting people against corporate abuse?

2 - We have a system in place for this. The problem with it is not that it's underfunded, but that it's been corrupted by the very corporations it tries to regulate! Arguably, stuff like the DMCA shows that more harm than good is done in some areas, thanks to this. This is perhaps the most serious problem in internal politics in America today but it's not in any way a funding problem.

And you just disproved your thesis. The end result of a body that regulates a business sector is always that the regulators get in bed with the people they're supposedly regulating and work together to erect barriers to entry into their cozy little oligopoly. Throwing more money at them will not fix the problem.

about a month and a half ago
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NSA Considers Linux Journal Readers, Tor (And Linux?) Users "Extremists"

Zordak Re:Underlying cause? (361 comments)

Well, I didn't actually say anything about Senator McCarthy. It is true that there were communist infiltrators, and it is true that the Rosenbergs were guilty. I'm talking about J. Edgar Hoover, who had secret files on pretty much every person in power in America. Like that dangerous communist, John F. Kennedy, for example, who knew not to mess with J. Edgar because J. Edgar could prove that Jack was bedding two or three different women a week. How many current politicians know not to mess with the NSA, because they know the NSA could scuttle their careers?

about a month and a half ago
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NSA Considers Linux Journal Readers, Tor (And Linux?) Users "Extremists"

Zordak Re:Know your history (361 comments)

Unfortunately, when it happens, the good things about the USA will fall with it. I admit, I enjoy being in a place where I can live on a nice suburban street with minimal immediate worries, drive a comfortable car with air conditioning, gas it up when necessary, and purchase as much food as I need at the grocery store whenever I need it. When the house of cards comes tumbling down, the WHOLE house of cards will come with it. Of course, our runaway spending will probably topple it before the iron fist of the NSA. But when it does happen, it will hardly matter what the most immediate exciting cause was.

about a month and a half ago
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NSA Considers Linux Journal Readers, Tor (And Linux?) Users "Extremists"

Zordak Re:Know your history (361 comments)

One YEAR. The exact same trend is continuing. No one of power is fighting this. No one is backing down.

No one, or almost no one, gets that high in the political machine without having some serious skeletons in the closet. And who knows where all those skeletons are hidden? Oh, yeah. The NSA. QED

about a month and a half ago
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NSA Considers Linux Journal Readers, Tor (And Linux?) Users "Extremists"

Zordak Re:To a coward... (361 comments)

There is an old saying: in a democracy, people deserve the government they get.

Actually, the saying is, "Democracy is the theory that the common people know what they want, and deserve to get it good and hard." It was H.L. Mencken who said it.

about a month and a half ago
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NSA Considers Linux Journal Readers, Tor (And Linux?) Users "Extremists"

Zordak Re:Underlying cause? (361 comments)

So - all in all, the tremendous snooping effort is not showing much result and essentially being a flop.

I don't know about that. I'm sure it's been about as successful as J. Edgar Hoover's mid-century communism witch hunts, which had more to do with propping up Hoover's own personal empire than with catching communists.

about a month and a half ago
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Site of 1976 "Atomic Man" Accident To Be Cleaned

Zordak Re:Faith in God (299 comments)

I have yet to see a war declared where a faction says, "Science is on our side!"

Then you need to study the history of the 20th Century, and eugenics.

about a month and a half ago
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Following EU Ruling, BBC Article Excluded From Google Searches

Zordak Re:Pivotal Decision That Went The Wrong Way... (239 comments)

On one hand you have a guy who got in a bar fight when he was in college. Some drunk idiot spills beer on his girlfriend, so he confronts drunk idiot and beats him down, then gets charged with assault. On the other hand, you have this piece of shit (Stan O'Neil).

Perhaps the answer is to remember that "information wants to be free," and therefore it's a bad idea to beat up some random guy because he spilled beer on your girlfriend if that's not the kind of reputation you want to have. In the meantime, other people can consider whether this 20-year-old assault charge is or is not relevant to their particular circumstances. If I'm looking to hire somebody where overall emotional sobriety and self control are important, I'd at least want to find out if he'd cooled his temper in the past 20 years. If I'm interested in the guy's credit before I complete a financial transaction with him, I couldn't care less about his 20 year old assault charge.

about 1 month ago

Submissions

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Pro bono Lawyer Fights C&D With Humor

Zordak Zordak writes  |  about a year ago

Zordak (123132) writes "When Jake Freivald received a questionable Cease and Desist letter from a big-firm attorney, demanding that he immediately relinquish rights to his website http://westorage.info, his pro-bono lawyer decided to treat the letter like the joke that it was. In a three-page missive, the lawyer points out the legal, constitutional, and ethical problems with the letter that led him to conclude that the letter was a joke. He concludes, in a postscript, with an unsubstantiated demand for $28,000 in overpaid property taxes, and offers to lease the city the domain name "westorange.gov" in exchange."
Link to Original Source
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New Bill Would Require Patent Trolls to Pay Defendants' Attorneys

Zordak Zordak writes  |  about a year and a half ago

Zordak writes "According to Law 360, H.R. 845, the "Saving High-Tech Innovators from Egregious Legal Disputes" (SHIELD) Act of 2013 would require non-practicing entities that lose in patent litigation to pay the full legal costs of accused infringers. The new bill would define a "non-practicing entity" as a plaintiff that is neither the original inventor or assignee of a patent, and that has not made its own "substantial investment in exploiting the patent." The bill is designed to particularly have a chilling effect on "shotgun" litigation tactics by NPEs, in which they sue numerous defendants on a patent with only a vague case for infringement. Notably, once a party is deemed to be an NPE early in the litigation, they will be required to post a bond to cover the defendants' litigation costs before going forward."
Link to Original Source
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Micron Lands Broad "Slide to Unlock" Patent

Zordak Zordak writes  |  about a year and a half ago

Zordak (123132) writes "Micron has recently landed U.S. Patent 8,352,745, which claims priority back to a February 2000 application---well before Apple's 2004 slide-to-unlock application. While claim construction is a highly technical art, the claims here are (for once) almost as broad as they sound, and may cover the bulk of touch screen smart phones on the market today. Dennis Crouch's Patently-O has a discussion."
Link to Original Source
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Apparently People Won't Pay $100/yr for Office

Zordak Zordak writes  |  about a year and a half ago

Zordak (123132) writes "CNN Money is running an article about Microsoft's long-anticipated switch to a subscription business model for Office. For only $100 per year, your family will be able to run Office365 on any five machines you want (as long as they're desktops or Windows 8 tablets, that is). More interesting than the article itself is the comments. The article closes by asking "Will you [pay up]?" The consensus in the comments is a resounding "NO," with frequent mentions of the suitability of OpenOffice for home productivity."
Link to Original Source
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The Veritas Mind Reading Machine

Zordak Zordak writes  |  more than 2 years ago

Zordak (123132) writes "Memories and thoughts are private—or at least they used to be. A new company, Veritas Scientific, is developing a technology that promises to peek into a person’s brain to reveal some of their secrets. “The last realm of privacy is your mind,” says Veritas CEO Eric Elbot. “This will invade that.”"
Link to Original Source
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Patent Attorneys Sued for Copyright Infringement

Zordak Zordak writes  |  more than 2 years ago

Zordak writes "Patent blogger Dennis Crouch writes on Patently-O of a catch 22 for attorneys. Patent attorneys (I am one, but not yours, obviously) are required to submit all prior art that they know of to the patent office. Failing to do so is an ethical violation, and can result in a patent being invalidated. But now the Hoboken Publishing Company and the American Institute of Physics are suing a major patent firm for copyright infringement, because they submit articles to the patent office without paying a separate royalty."
Link to Original Source
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Public Domain Saved "It's a Wonderful Life"

Zordak Zordak writes  |  more than 3 years ago

Zordak (123132) writes "With Christmas just around the corner, it's good to remember how lapsing into the public domain probably saved "It's a Wonderful Life" from relative obscurity. In 2002, NPR ran a feature explaining how the movie flopped at the box office, despite critical praise and Oscar nominations. By the 1970s, the movie was practically unknown---until budget-pinched TV stations realized that the owner had failed to renew the copyright, so they could show the film for free. By the 1990s, the movie had become a Holiday staple. Though still popular, the movie is no longer ubiquitous because Aaron Spelling realized that he owned the copyright on the underlying story and some of the background music."
Link to Original Source
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Amazon 1-Click Patent Survives Almost Unscathed

Zordak Zordak writes  |  more than 4 years ago

Zordak (123132) writes "Amazon's infamous "1-click" patent has been in reexamination at the USPTO for almost four years. Patently-O now reports that "the USPTO confirmed the patentability of original claims 6-10 and amended claims 1-5 and 11-26. The approved-of amendment adds the seeming trivial limitation that the one-click system operates as part of a 'shopping cart model.' Thus, to infringe the new version of the patent, an eCommerce retailer must use a shopping cart model (presumably non-1-click) alongside of the 1-click version. Because most retail eCommerce sites still use the shopping cart model, the added limitation appears to have no practical impact on the patent scope.""
Link to Original Source
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Al Qaeda Goes Green

Zordak Zordak writes  |  more than 4 years ago

Zordak (123132) writes "In a sign that "green" has truly gone mainstream, we read on CNN that Osama bin Laden and his friends in Al Qaeda are now concerned about global warming. "This is a message to the whole world about those responsible for climate change and its repercussions – whether intentionally or unintentionally — and about the action we must take," bin Laden says in the tape, according to Al-Jazeera's Web site. "George Bush junior, preceded by congress, dismissed the [Kyoto Protocol] agreement to placate giant corporations. And they are themselves standing behind speculation, monopoly and soaring living costs." I, for one, expect bin Laden to step up himself and show us how he is going to ensure that future terrorist attacks are carried out in an environmentally-responsible way."
Link to Original Source
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Federal Appeals Court Tosses Spam Patent

Zordak Zordak writes  |  more than 4 years ago

Zordak (123132) writes "Dennis Crouch's Patently-O is running a news item about U.S. patent 6,631,400, which has claims drawn to a method of making sure enough people get your spam. A federal district court had overturned the patent as anticipated, obvious, and not drawn to patentable subject matter. The Federal Circuit, the appeals court which hears patent matters, upheld the finding of obviousness, thus invalidating the patent."
Link to Original Source
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Bad Acts Render Rambus Patents Unenforceable

Zordak Zordak writes  |  more than 5 years ago

Zordak writes "In a recent decision, Judge Sue Robinson of the United States District Court for the District of Deleware found Rambus patents unenforceable against Micron. Judge Robinson recounts Rambus's shady history of seeking to create a "patent minefield," and hiring an attorney to implement an aggressive litigation strategy. She then takes Rambus to task for implementing a new document retention (meaning "destruction") policy and holding a company-wide "shred day" on Sept. 3, 1998, well after they anticipated litigation of the patents. This was evidence that Rambus had destroyed relevant documents in bad faith. Finally, she found that, as lesser sanctions would be "impractical, bordering on meaningless," the appropriate sanction was to find Rambus's patents unenforceable against Micron.

Although this order relates only to Rambus's case against Micron, it is possible that the same bad acts will taint other Rambus litigation."
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Replacing Metal Detectors with Brain Scans

Zordak Zordak writes  |  more than 5 years ago

Zordak writes "CNN is running a story about several Israeli firms that want to replace metal detectors at the airport with biometric readings. For example, with funding from TSA and DHS "WeCU ([creepily] pronounced "We See You") Technologies, employs a combination of infra-red technology, remote sensors and imagers, and flashing of subliminal images, such as a photo of Osama bin Laden. Developers say the combination of these technologies can detect a person's reaction to certain stimuli by reading body temperature, heart rate and respiration — signals a terrorist unwittingly emits before he plans to commit an attack." Sensors may be embedded in the carpet, seats, and check-in screens. The stated goal is to read a passenger's "intention" in a manner that is "more fair, more effective and less expensive" than traditional profiling. But not to worry! WeCU's CEO says, "We don't want you to feel that you are being interrogated." And you may get through security in 20 to 30 seconds."
Link to Original Source
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Federal Circuit Limits Business Method Patents

Zordak Zordak writes  |  more than 5 years ago

Zordak writes "The Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit has just issued its much-anticipated opinion in In Re Bilski. This was a re-visit of the State Street issue of what constitutes patentable subject matter (including whether software and business methods are patentable). In summary, the court has affirmed and strengthened the "machine-or-transformation" test, upholding the patent office's rejection of claims on a method to hedging risk in the field of commodities trading. Although the court refused to categorically exclude software patents, it is likely that the reasoning of this decision will be used to reject many software patents (note that some of the dissenting judges would have completely overturned State Street and tossed out all software and business method patents). Although not as sweeping as some had hoped for, it is certain that this decision, along with the Supreme Court's KSR decision last year, will lay a difficult mine field for those who want to patent software and business methods."
Link to Original Source

Journals

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LSAT

Zordak Zordak writes  |  more than 11 years ago Well, I did it. I just took the LSAT. I get to see what my score is 4 January, and if it's high enough, hopefully I'll get into a law school. To the world of Patent Law: Here I Come!

Incindentally, my conclusion on the LSAT: it would be trivially easy if it weren't for the friggin' time limit! Of course, I guess that's the point. Lawyers are supposed to think quickly, or something like that.

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Barbara Streisand is a moron

Zordak Zordak writes  |  more than 11 years ago Besides being uglier than your average sewer rat, Barbara Streisand has proven herself a moron. Like some people on Slashdot, she fell for the fake Julius Caesar quote (here is the first reference to it I found with a google search). Now, I was almost ready to give Streisand some credit for thinking the quote came from the Shakeseare play Julius Caesar rather than from Caesar himself. Attributing it to Caesar is stupid for several reasons. First, what latin phrase translates into "whip the people into a patriotic fervor," precisely? "Whip into" is an english idiom that I doubt Caesar used. A good translator would have chosen a better phrase. Second, why would Caesar be warning people against leaders who did what he did? That would be like Hitler warning against murderous dictators. It just doesn't make any sense. Third, I am not aware of any case where Roman Citizens, voluntarily and of their own initiative, gave up their rights en masse in order to allow Caesar to fight a war, so the quote is historically questionable. Others who are more conversant in the affairs of ancient Rome have offered additional reasons why it is unreasonable to believe that this quote is from Caesar, such as the fact that Romans did not use war drums. The foregoing are just the ones that immediately occurred to me.

So, like I said, my first thought was, "At least she didn't attribute it to Caesar." Rather, she was suckered into believing that it was penned by Shakespeare. However, after about two seconds of reflection, I decided attributing it to Shakespeare makes her even more of a moron. Why? My first reason stands. "Whips into" is not consistent with Shakespeare's writing style. The second reason stands too. Why would Shakespeare have Caesar cautioning against rulers like himself? Most importantly, Barbara Streisand is a supposedly professional actress. You would think she would have studied some Shakespeare in her time. After all, Shakespeare, to the field of drama, is like the physicists' Newton, Einstein and Hawking all combined. He was the master playwright. So, since we're assuming Streisand has studied some Shakespeare, even if the phrase "whip into" didn't trigger a question mark, how is it that she didn't notice that this stupid quote is not anything like iambic pentameter, Shakespeare's favorite meter? Granted, "Beware the leader who bangs the drums of war" is almost iambic pentameter (replacing "leader" with "man" should do it), and since Shakespeare was not religious about it, that line could maybe pass. But the rest does not even resemble metered verse. It doesn't sound like Shakespeare at all. It sounds like the ramblings of a pacifist weenie. The quote, that a "friend" found somewhere on the internet (a questionable resource that should always be double checked), should have immediately set off alarms in her head. She should have gotten out her copy of The Complete Works of William Shakespeare (every actor should have one) and looked for the quote, or downloaded one of the e-texts from Project Gutenberg and done a quick text search of the play for a key phrase. Then she would have found that the quote has nothing to do with either Shakespeare or Caesar. It was fraudulently penned, and apparently quite recently, since nobody seems to be able to find an occurrence of it prior to 11 Sept. 2001 (please correct me if you find a prior reference). This would have saved her a good deal of embarassment. Since she wasn't bright enough to see big, red, flashing alarms when the quote was attributed to Shakespeare, I am forced to openly mock her, as I do all pacifist weenies who jump all over this quote the first time they see it. Like others, she ended up whining about how, okay, maybe it wasn't written by Shakespeare or Caesar, but it's still important and relevant, blah blah, sob, sob. The truth is, it's not important or relevant. People with an agenda trying to prove their points by citing other people with the same agenda is a very weak form of argument. Pacifist weenies referring to quotes by other pacifist weenies only works for pacifist weenies (which is why the pacifist weenies at the Democratic fund raiser applauded her so excitedly), just like Microsoft FUD about Linux (and Linux FUD about Microsoft, while we're on the subject) only serves to whip the apologists and devotees into an OS-Pride fervor. It is not at all persuasive. If the Democrats want to convince people there is something wrong with Pres. Bush's Iraq policy, they need to use some logic and reason, not clueless entertainers.

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Illegal Prime Number

Zordak Zordak writes  |  more than 12 years ago This got rejected, so I'll just have to put it in my journal, because I think it's actually pretty cool, and could expose some of the technical flaws of the DMCA. Tasty Bits from the Technology Front has a story (about a year old now), about a prime number that may be illegal under the DMCA. The number, when converted to hex, becomes a binary gzipped file that contains important parts of the DeCSSS source code, which we all know is illegal under the DMCA. Follow the link. It's fun for all ages.

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Law School

Zordak Zordak writes  |  more than 12 years ago I think I've decided to go to law school once I finish my undergrad degree in EE. Perhaps the world could use a few lawyers who actually understand technology. Besides that, patent lawyers get paid obscene amounts of money because there aren't a lot of lawyers with a formal technical education.

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