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Comments

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Apple Yanks Mac Virus Immunity Claims From Website

a90Tj2P7 Re:Sheesh (327 comments)

Apple's market share is 66% for all personal computers sold in stores for more than $1,000. In addition, Apple's market share as been increasing as sales of PCs as a whole have been dropping.

Are you serious? Those are sales figures (sold new at retail stores in first quarter 2008 for over $1000), not usage figures. You're not talking about what's being used in the market, just what was sold during the first quarter - OF 2008! - and even then you're only considering retail stores and $1000+ computers, where the average PC cost is $650. So not only are your sales figures irrelevant to a discussion about usage share, but they're cherrypicked to such a ridiculous level that they're not even relevant as overall sales figures. That's like saying a large percentage of the cars on the road are Cadillacs because, in June of 2010, they sold the most domestic cars that cost more than $40k. Most cars cost less than that new, many cars aren't bought from domestic dealerships, and most of the cars on the road aren't new or weren't bought new in that time period. Likewise, most computers don't cost that much, many of them aren't bought from retail stores, and there are more computers out there than what was bought new in the first quarter of 2008.

The GP's point was that Mac's desktop OS market share is less than 10%. And that's not only true, but it's generous - as of 5/2012, they've got about 6.5%. Like it was mentioned earlier, less than Vista.

more than 2 years ago
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Microsoft's Surface Caught Windows OEMs By Surprise

a90Tj2P7 Re:Laptop & Desktop & Portable (565 comments)

There's a long, long way to go there, outside of casual browsing. The role of PEDs right now is more or less about remote access to or portable copies of data stored elsewhere. They're media and communication devices, but not workstations or storage devices. Sure, there may come in time in the future where they're much more capable of heavy processing and multitasking, but not in the immediate future, and certainly not already - which is what your post was claiming. These devices are nigh useless for much more than simple apps, browsing the internet, syncing email and entertaining yourself. Especially in enterprise, they're just tools for accessing or carrying around work you've done on an actual computer. Even laptops didn't kill desktops. There's a long way to go, and there's a lot more to it than just having more processing power and memory.

more than 2 years ago
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Microsoft's Surface Caught Windows OEMs By Surprise

a90Tj2P7 Re:*** Announcement project*** (565 comments)

Now the war is in full swing between Google and Apple, which have trampled the laptop and desktop markets

Portable devices have more or less supplemented laptops and desktops, they really haven't made any big dent towards replacing them, let alone "trample" them. They've taken more away from the mobile phone market than desktop computing.

more than 2 years ago
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Ubuntu Lays Plans For Getting Past UEFI SecureBoot

a90Tj2P7 Re:Why not ignore UEFI? (393 comments)

You know (U)EFI has been replacing BIOS slowly but increasingly for over a decade now, right? And that Linux was the first OS to support it? Anyone saying their solution is not to buy UEFI computers or motherboards probably already has one and doesn't know it.

I'd also say that there's probably a lot more people who install Linux on OEM computers than you seem to think.

more than 2 years ago
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Android App Lets You Steal Contactless Credit Card Data

a90Tj2P7 Re:Hate broadcasting CC (221 comments)

Aside from limited options and general gaudiness, that does nothing to help you when you're taking the card out of the wallet at the checkout or an ATM. It's nice and all, but if you were able to opt-out of an unrequested "upgrade" to this feature like the GP's saying, you wouldn't have to waste money on cheap, ugly RFID-blocking wallets in the first place. That's a bandaid fix for a broken system that, in this case, wasn't even asked for.

more than 2 years ago
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DarwinTunes Iterates, Mixes And Culls To Create Listenable Music From Noise

a90Tj2P7 So it's... (53 comments)

Survival of the phattest?

more than 2 years ago
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U.S. Students Struggle With Reasoning Skills

a90Tj2P7 Re:Misleading headline? (488 comments)

How much of that "baseline of actual data" is actually about reasoning skills? This isn't a test of knowledge or aptitude.

more than 2 years ago
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How Would You Redesign the TLD Hierarchy?

a90Tj2P7 Re:We only need 7 TLDs (265 comments)

That'd never work - people and companies would have to focus on one.

more than 2 years ago
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US Consumer Bureau Opens Online Credit Card Complaint DB

a90Tj2P7 Re:well damn (162 comments)

Oh, there are plenty of ways to get into debt without having credit. Personal debts, student loans, bills, unpaid taxes, medical bills (even if you have insurance, deductibles for things like even minor outpatient surgery are often 4-digits), fines, etc., etc. The only debts you can avoid by not having credit are loans/mortgages and credit card debt.

But even ignoring all of that, going into debt your way is the result of using credit irresponsibly. You might have needed credit as a factor, but it wasn't the direct and inherent cause of going into debt any more than you smashing your own thumb with a hammer was caused by the fact that you owned one. It's misuse and carelessness.

more than 2 years ago
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US Consumer Bureau Opens Online Credit Card Complaint DB

a90Tj2P7 Re:Interesting but... (162 comments)

It'd be interesting, but trivial. They're just the networks, not the lenders or servicers - they're going to have little to nothing to do with business practice complaints and banks' policies. Most of those banks deal in both. It'd be like looking at customer service complaints of PC manufacturers and wanting to know how it broke down between Intel and AMD processors.

more than 2 years ago
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US Consumer Bureau Opens Online Credit Card Complaint DB

a90Tj2P7 Re:well damn (162 comments)

False dichotomy. Credit isn't debt, it's the amount of debt they would trust you with. You don't have to be in debt to have credit.

more than 2 years ago
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US Consumer Bureau Opens Online Credit Card Complaint DB

a90Tj2P7 Re:well damn (162 comments)

I've never understood the reasoning with why closing a 0 balance credit card should lower a credit score.

...It's like saying paying off a mortgage should lower your credit score.

Because [that part of it] is about how much unused credit you've got, how low your debt:credit ratio is. They're looking at how you use revolving credit, not how fast you pay off a debt like a mortgage.

more than 2 years ago
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FunnyJunk Sues the Oatmeal Over TM and "Incitement To Cyber-Vandalism"

a90Tj2P7 Re:Let's Really Fix that Headline! (390 comments)

Simplifying is one thing, but miscrediting (or, in this case, mis-blaming) a person/organization is another. Saying FunnyJunk is suing The Oatmeal isn't the same thing as saying something that makes it clear Carreon is suing The Oatmeal personally. Maybe "Lawyer Sues The Oatmeal Over FunnyJunk Threat Reactions". You don't want to misstate who the story is about or who took what action.

more than 2 years ago
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FunnyJunk Sues the Oatmeal Over TM and "Incitement To Cyber-Vandalism"

a90Tj2P7 Re:Time for FunnyJunk to sue its lawyer? (390 comments)

Related but nonetheless separate issues. Conflict A was that FunnyJunk had Carreon inform The Oatmeal that they were threatening to sue. Conflict B is that Carreon is suing Inman because he believes The Oatmeal incited attacks against him personally (defamation, hacking) for his involvement in Conflict A.

To make the GP clearer, this development has nothing to do with FunnyJunk suing anyone.

more than 2 years ago
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FunnyJunk Sues the Oatmeal Over TM and "Incitement To Cyber-Vandalism"

a90Tj2P7 Re:Oatmeal stumbled here (390 comments)

GP's statement does apply more to plaintiffs than defandants, who are more likely to be awarded costs if they win. Really, that doesn't go overlooked or ignored.

more than 2 years ago
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Hacked Companies Fight Back With Controversial Steps

a90Tj2P7 Re:Best defense.... (320 comments)

Never keep sensitive data that you don't need, overwrite it, then delete.

Also, you should burn all the clothes you haven't worn in over a week (you obviously don't need that many clothes), not have a junk drawer, and while you're at it, delete any data on your system with an access time older than 3 months. Also, delete sarcasm.sys ...

I think he's (badly) trying to say that you shouldn't repurpose media that was used for sensitivie info without sanitizing it.

more than 2 years ago
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Hacked Companies Fight Back With Controversial Steps

a90Tj2P7 Re:Not true that fighting back doesn't work. (320 comments)

(A little old to be called "script kiddies", BTW.)

It has nothing to do with age, it's about the skill level required to do what they do.

more than 2 years ago
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Hacked Companies Fight Back With Controversial Steps

a90Tj2P7 Re:Companies are known to strike back (320 comments)

... but if you think about it it actually make sense. The fact that the terms are inaccurate is immaterial. She could have told them [a realistic explanation]. Would they have understood any more?

... She's telling a colleague, who wouldn't understand anyway, a bunch of buzzwords and jargon to dissuade them from getting too involved in something which will only confuse them, and distract them from their own involvement in the situation.

If Finance ask you about backups, do you tell them about cron jobs and the difference between differential and full backups? No, you tell them it's daily and hosted off site...

Oversimplifying or glossing over things is perfectly fine, deliberate misinformation is reprehensible and only causes future problems. The level of detail you go into should vary for the target audience, but never the accuracy. Obviously, talking about a TV show - where everything from law and medicine to the operation of cars is usually completely flawed - is one thing, but I'd definitely never defend the idea of deliberately miseducating people IRL just because you don't think they'd understand. That's how people were taught the improper terms and processes they'll misuse in the future. For example, the layman could probably understand something like "I used a specialized software package to exploit a security hole that let me get into their system and then take it over."

more than 2 years ago
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Assange Loses Latest Round In Extradition Fight

a90Tj2P7 Re:Oh, bullshit, AC. (296 comments)

So what you're implying is that if you would visit China and criticize the Chinese government, you ought to get extradited from another country to China "for questioning" if the Chinese authority want you? And you wouldn't consider this harrassment or try to fight against it?

Objectively, provided there's enough evidence to make somebody a suspect, yes, they should absolutely, positively be questioned during a legitimate criminal investigation. That's the whole point of whistleblowing, that position or power doesn't mean you shouldn't be held accountable for wrongdoing. Stop trying to make an emotional appeal against reason, your argument here is "you shouldn't face questioning for a crime if you think it's just because they're 'harassing' you". "But what if it was you?" isn't a point, it's a fallacy.

You do realize that what Assange could be accused for in Sweden does not count as rape or any other crime in all other countries of Europe, the US, and in fact in practically all countries of the world? That the reason he is being wanted for questioning is because he would very likely not be extradited to Sweden if he was wanted for the actual "crime", since sleeping without condome is not generally punishable by UK law?

Are you actually arguing that you shouldn't be held accountable for a crime committed in one country, if it isn't illegal in others? That's ridiculous. So is the idea that they're only extraditing him because it's for questioning and not yet prosecution, the fact that they're willing to obviously speaks volumes in disagreement. That doesn't make any sense, at all. They know what the case is about, there's zero reason to believe they'd extradite someone for investigation but not prosecution, it would be completely ass-backwards. If they thought the case was serious enough and strong enough to extradite him for questioning, then there's no doubting whatosever that they'd do it for an indictment.

There are numerous other oddities in this case. Did you know that Assange was...

Yes, yes, a thousand times, yes. People know this stuff. Some of your reasoning is kind of flawed, though.

While Interpol's involvement was questionable, your wikipedia cut-and-paste of what they "normally do" is not the limitation of what they can do. The operative part of that summary is that it started with "primarily works on", or in your copy, "normally works on". Do you really think "rape" investigations go international often enough to make that list? They assist in international criminal investigations. This is a criminal investigation into someone who's travelled to another country. It's uncommon and seems beneath them, but it isn't against any rules and it doesn't defy logic. The questionable part is that they're forbidden from getting involved in political crimes, but as much as the conspiracy theorists might argue that's why this criminal investigation exists, it's not directly and explicitly relevant - even if it is the motivation behind pusuing the crime, that doesn't mean the crime didn't occur.

And it certainly isn't any surprise that a prosecutor who didn't want to prosecute would be replaced with one who did.

As for the video conferencing, while it may be questionable that the prosecutor didn't want to compromise, it's much more questionable that a suspect would refuse to come back for questioning. It's also difficult, if not outright stupid, to question a suspect when they're outside of your jurisdiction, let alone in another country with different laws, rights and legal processes.

more than 2 years ago

Submissions

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Apple Planning to Build Private Restaurant

a90Tj2P7 a90Tj2P7 writes  |  more than 2 years ago

a90Tj2P7 writes "Chris Matyszczyk reports on CNET that Apple is building a 21,468 square foot private restaurant in Cupertino. Apple's director of real estate facilities, Dan Wisenhunt, stated that "We like to provide a level of security so that people and employees can feel comfortable talking about their business, their research and whatever project they're engineering without fear of competition sort of overhearing their conversations.""
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