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Ask Slashdot: Best Software For Image Organization?

aaronb1138 Facebook (257 comments)

Privacy, copyright, resolution, and control issues aside, it seems like Facebook currently has the best software for collecting, cataloging, and tagging images. The facial recognition in Facebook is even excellent, automatically suggesting to tag friends accurately in poorly lit, blurry shots. The timeline, album, and geographical features are great, with the biggest weakness is usually bandwidth to sync a large bulk of photos in one go.

I am certainly not suggesting he use Facebook, quite the opposite. I'm saying that commercial standalone software should try to be as good and easy to use as Facebook and similar like Google+.

2 days ago
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Unity 8 Will Bring 'Pure' Linux Experience To Mobile Devices

aaronb1138 Re:Ugh (125 comments)

Android is an objectively bad OS. It's designed for mobile devices and commits the great sin of failing to be parsimonious with computing resources.

I am a current Android user (Galaxy S4) and have always championed it over iPhone due to the greater device control and options. I'm getting off that train with my next phone purchase. The last nail in the coffin was getting to see a heads up comparison of battery life of HTC One M8 Android vs WP 8. Previously it was easy to dismiss WP 8's battery life on underpowered CPUs and lots of crazy tweaks by Nokia engineers. Now the truth is out, that Android is just a sluggish OS due to poor optimization and the ignorant insistence of using scripting language / virtualized code everywhere instead of compiling for the target.

about a week ago
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IoT Is the Third Big Technology 'Wave' In the Last 50 Years, Says Harvard

aaronb1138 Re:Responsibility (196 comments)

I have an earlier model G35, and as much as I would like to have the push button start option, I fear exactly that. So far I think only a couple members of a local club have had to deal with it, though I hear it is more prevalent with some of the SUVs.

This does coincide with the BMW and similar thefts due to remote hacking. It's unacceptable and either the manufactures should be footing the bill directly or paying an underwriter to take responsibility for security mistakes.

about two weeks ago
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IoT Is the Third Big Technology 'Wave' In the Last 50 Years, Says Harvard

aaronb1138 Re:Responsibility (196 comments)

I should clarify that although all of my examples stem from the perspective of consumer devices in the home, they should equally apply to the implementation of industrial, infrastructure, and similar commercial systems.

about two weeks ago
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IoT Is the Third Big Technology 'Wave' In the Last 50 Years, Says Harvard

aaronb1138 Responsibility (196 comments)

This is all fine and dandy as long as a few simple requirements are well understood by the technology implementers.
1) Legal liability for appliances and their cock ups is handled in much the same way as it is now.
If my toaster starts a fire and burns down my house, the insurance cuts me a check immediately while they handle the legal battle with GE (toaster manufacturer) and UL (Underwriters Laboratory who signed off on the device safety). The same legal protections for technology in appliances should be in effect. If my dishwasher gets malware (or just includes it by default) and causes my refrigerator to stop working and spoil my food, the insurance cuts me a check for my losses and to replace the defective appliances, and handles the legal issues.
2) Device interoperability needs to be as easy as antiquated analog systems.
You could hook up a TV with RCA or coax connections and be watching off a VCR or DVD player in minutes. It's ridiculous that HDMI is rarely so straightforward (it occasionally works this simply). Resolution, aspect ratio, audio stream selection, and DRM phone home setup is retarded.
3) Pick a device class to be the central hub, management, and gatekeeper. I suggest home wifi routers or a cheap, simple network bridge device.
4) Full control of permissions and actions by devices with simple to understand language.
If I don't want my washing machine downloading ads for Tide and Purex, it better f---ing not download ads. Same goes for usage tracking uploads.
5) Power usage should not significantly go up. If anything, connected devices should be able to lend clues as to how little changes can make my home greener and/or lower utility bills. Example: washing machine suggests running wash cycle at 8 PM to get out of peak usage billing. It sends me an SMS if I select, to let me know to put the clothes into the dryer.
6) Device electronics / control should be isolated to prevent the additional complication from increasing failure rate.
It's stupid, bad engineering that the more features a home appliance has, i.e. the more premium it is, the more consumers see failures. If the toaster can't get online, it better still make my toast when I press the button.

about two weeks ago
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Ask Slashdot: Non-Coders, Why Aren't You Contributing To Open Source?

aaronb1138 Re:Snarky yet true (488 comments)

Not to mention the frequency where customers realized they are / were getting way overcharged for the amount of code they essentially purchased.

It is interesting to see Agile + managed hosting / development / support become popular for software products in niche markets where a new version every 5 years would cover every use case. At the same time those niches are severely disrupted as soon as a competing product enters the marketplace.

about two weeks ago
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Ask Slashdot: Non-Coders, Why Aren't You Contributing To Open Source?

aaronb1138 Re:Cult (488 comments)

One model which would work functionally but massively reduce the headcount most FOSS projects like to tout would be the Habitat for Humanity setup.

Tell people that to contribute, these are the days and times for which they can sign up. Tell them what scope knowledgeable leader they will be reporting to. Let the group leaders track down who showed up (physically or virtually) and hand out assignments.

about two weeks ago
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Ask Slashdot: Non-Coders, Why Aren't You Contributing To Open Source?

aaronb1138 Re:Cult (488 comments)

It's hard enough to get software developers to fix a problem in a product for which one is paying. Nearly every issue I have run into with open source is a driver or compatibility issue which was previously documented years prior to my own stumbling upon it. The developers weren't interested enough back at that time to fix it, and it leaves me with little faith that it is worth my time to chime in with a "me too", not to mention the hate for resurrecting old threads or bug reports.

Part of the problem with open source is freedom. Not enough people sat down at their desk and told to fix it instead of working on what interests them.

about two weeks ago
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Major Brain Pathway Rediscovered After Century-old Confusion, Controversy

aaronb1138 Re:reflexes? (114 comments)

I was less concerned with the issues of stereo depth perception. I am comfortable with people driving with only one eye. I have a pretty good understanding of how the fovea and periphery vision systems work and interact. One eye massively increases the peripheral blind spot on one side, but that is easy to compensate for with mirrors and moving your eyes / head.

Double vision where the two images don't overlap concerns me quite a bit more. I am sure her dominant eye takes over to the point that she might as well have just one eye, but there is a greater range for misinterpretation of perception with two images which don't agree.

about a month ago
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Major Brain Pathway Rediscovered After Century-old Confusion, Controversy

aaronb1138 Re:reflexes? (114 comments)

Something about her driving sounds irresponsible.

about a month ago
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US Postal Service Suspends Telecommuting Following Massive Breach

aaronb1138 Re:Why do VPN users have access to this much data? (50 comments)

Usually, I have found the culprit in large organizations with strong granular security to be the <proprietary single purpose business application> developers and support. The number of times I have watched a new person get onboard and have proper, restricted intranet access, and then the application support people have to open everything up to them to get that one proprietary app to work is astounding.

about a month ago
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Airbnb To Start Collecting Hotel Tax On Rentals In San Francisco

aaronb1138 Finally, an honest Internet company (71 comments)

It is really great that AirBNB is being a responsible civic citizen and charging / paying taxes which apply to their business.

Can we go ahead and explain to Uber and Lyft that they need taxi licenses and to pay their share or gtfo.

about 2 months ago
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Future Hack: New Cybersecurity Tool Predicts Breaches Before They Happen

aaronb1138 Re:What a coincidence. (33 comments)

Wouldn't it just be easier to aggregate information from social media sites using a weighted system. Just put 4Chan at the top of the weighting, with Facebook next and use separate weighting scales for positive versus negative mention counts. Both are valid predictors, so it should work and get closer.

I'm glad one of my side jobs is setting up IPS / IDP and similar security on firewalls. I'll never be thirsting for work.

about 4 months ago
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Linus Torvalds: 'I Still Want the Desktop'

aaronb1138 Re:Why focus on the desktop? (727 comments)

Horribly ineffective, but that hasn't stopped the iOS fandom from embracing the iPad as a poor substitute for a content creation device, including software development.

about 4 months ago
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Linus Torvalds: 'I Still Want the Desktop'

aaronb1138 Re:Why focus on the desktop? (727 comments)

Embracing the device world and abandoning the desktop means exclusive large sources of cash and interested parties who would take control of the kernel from Linus. That's why he needs the desktop to stay alive as a dream. Red Hat, IBM, and Apache are probably the only ones with any clout keeping Samsung and Google from digging deep and streamlining the kernel for ARM / mobile device use exclusively.

I wouldn't even blame Google, Samsung, et. al. if they did decide to just flat out fork the kernel completely and drop the cruft. Hopefully they would bring an ABI driver framework with them.

about 4 months ago
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New Car Heads-Up Display To Be Controlled By Hand Gestures, Voice Commands

aaronb1138 Re:Any bets on how long before the plug is pulled? (142 comments)

Let me preface that I think lawyers are a terrible scourge and sap resources from the global economy and especially in the US from the GDP.

That said, I really want to see a successful lawsuit against Kickstarter making them responsible for inherently bad / illegal products. This licensing / EULA / contracts crap that absolves the middle men of responsibility is complete garbage.

about 4 months ago
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Hotel Charges Guests $500 For Bad Online Reviews

aaronb1138 Re:The real issue (183 comments)

Just looked at the Yelp reviews... Yep lots of people who have never come close to the place spouting off just so someone thinks their voice is important and try to make some false attempt at social commentary.

I guess the same charge could be leveled at /. posters...

about 4 months ago
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Hotel Charges Guests $500 For Bad Online Reviews

aaronb1138 The real issue (183 comments)

The real issue is people putting ridiculous amounts of stock into online reviews that are easily manipulated both by the vendor of a given service or a minority of disgruntled and hyper-critical customers. With groups like Yelp or Angie's List, it gets especially messy, because they don't use a verification system for reviewers and on both sides there are paid armies of the people who can't hack it as (lame sack of shite) SEO consultants trying to grift a buck manipulating reviews positive for their clients and negative for nearby competitors.

This gets even worse when we consider the nasty culture of anti-confrontation where people instead of bringing an issue appropriately to management and getting it fixed, just spout vitriol and become oversensitive over minutia.

Sure, lots of bad service exists in the various service and product industries. The simple fix is to clearly ask for what you want and then not pay (demand a credit / refund) when things are not made right. Too bad the majority of people willing to go to such lengths are usually the self-absorbed assholes who have unreasonable requests and expectations.

about 4 months ago
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Ask Slashdot: What To Do About the Sorry State of FOSS Documentation?

aaronb1138 Re:Nothing (430 comments)

This. This guy gets it. And it gets really old having programmers blame all of their issues on "I gots the aspergers" and "I'm a creative person". The source code for most FOSS projects is a terrible mess anyways. People just shove their hands in wherever they want and leave garbage behind. Good source code seems to only come from individual / small team (<5 devs) projects and some commercial software. A few older semi-FOSS projects (more the freeware not OSS or shareware projects) for Windows aren't too bad either, but the programmers all eventually let the projects go as they are highly employable and get jobs that pay them for their quality work.

The GNU and Linux communities are rife with people who aren't otherwise employable and can't keep it together personally or professionally. I don't mind deploying Linux servers for specialized purposes, but you can be sure I disable automatic update mechanisms most of the time to prevent the inevitable critical application breakage that the lack of testing and consistency brings.

about 4 months ago
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Ask Slashdot: Linux Login and Resource Management In a Computer Lab?

aaronb1138 Re:Good grief (98 comments)

Old saying goes, "I can't afford to buy cheap crap."

I have yet to see a computing environment where the demand of computing power significantly outstripped supply due to antiquated technology except where the network administrators were practically tenured. In those cases they were gobbling up so much in salary and blowing time to keep fixing stuff mostly due to age.

The administrator even seems to point at that he is trying to fix problems that don't fully exist. "...and it is hacked a lot." Is one of those telling statements that maybe the problems are the administrator going overboard to justify his job.

about 5 months ago

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