Beta
×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

Comments

aarondubrow hasn't commented recently.

Submissions

top

Designing tomorrow's air traffic control systems

aarondubrow aarondubrow writes  |  about two weeks ago

aarondubrow (1866212) writes "According to FAA estimates, increasing congestion in the air transportation system of the United States, if unaddressed, will cost the American economy $22 billion annually in lost economic activity by 2022. MIT researcher Hamsa Balakrishnan and her team are making air traffic control systems more efficient through a combination of better models and new embedded technologies. Testing their algorithms at Logan Airport in Boston, they showed that by holding aircraft back for 4.5 minutes, they could improve flow on the runways and save nearly 100 pounds of fuel for each aircraft."
top

Brown Dog: A search engine for the other 99 percent (of data)

aarondubrow aarondubrow writes  |  about two weeks ago

aarondubrow (1866212) writes "We've all experienced the frustration of trying to access information on websites, only to find that the data is trapped in outdated, difficult-to-read file formats and that metadata--the critical data about the data, such as when and how and by whom it was produced---is nonexistent. Led by Kenton McHenry, a team at NCSA is working to change that. Recipients in 2013 of a $10 million, five-year award from the National Science Foundation, the team is developing software that allows researchers to manage and make sense of vast amounts of digital scientific data that is currently trapped in outdated file formats. The NCSA team recently demonstrated two publicly-available services to make the contents of uncurated data collections accessible."
top

Laying the groundwork for data-driven science

aarondubrow aarondubrow writes  |  about three weeks ago

aarondubrow (1866212) writes "The ability to collect and analyze massive amounts of data is transforming science, industry and everyday life. But what we've seen so far is likely just the tip of the iceberg. As part of an effort to improve the nation's capacity in data science, NSF today announced $31 million in new funding to support 17 innovative projects under the Data Infrastructure Building Blocks (DIBBs) program, including data infrastructure for education, ecology and geophysics. "Each project tests a critical component in a future data ecosystem in conjunction with a research community of users," said said Irene Qualters, division director for Advanced Cyberinfrastructure at NSF. "This assures that solutions will be applied and use-inspired.""
top

Protecting America's Processors

aarondubrow aarondubrow writes  |  about a month ago

aarondubrow (1866212) writes "The National Science Foundation and the Semiconductor Research Corporation announced nine research awards to 10 universities totaling nearly $4 million under a joint program focused on Secure, Trustworthy, Assured and Resilient Semiconductors and Systems. The awards support the development of new strategies, methods and tools at the circuit, architecture and system levels, to decrease the likelihood of unintended behavior or access; increase resistance and resilience to tampering; and improve the ability to provide authentication throughout the supply chain and in the field.

"The processes and tools used to design and manufacture semiconductors ensure that the resulting product does what it is supposed to do. However, a key question that must also be addressed is whether the product does anything else, such as behaving in ways that are unintended or malicious," said Keith Marzullo, division director of NSF's Computer and Network Systems Division."
top

Protecting America's Processors

aarondubrow aarondubrow writes  |  about a month ago

aarondubrow (1866212) writes "The National Science Foundation (NSF) and the Semiconductor Research Corporation (SRC) announced nine research awards to 10 universities totaling nearly $4 million under a joint program focused on Secure, Trustworthy, Assured and Resilient Semiconductors and Systems. The awards support the development of new strategies, methods and tools at the circuit, architecture and system levels, to decrease the likelihood of unintended behavior or access; increase resistance and resilience to tampering; and improve the ability to provide authentication throughout the supply chain and in the field.

"The processes and tools used to design and manufacture semiconductors ensure that the resulting product does what it is supposed to do. However, a key question that must also be addressed is whether the product does anything else, such as behaving in ways that are unintended or malicious," said Keith Marzullo, division director of NSF's Computer and Network Systems Division."
top

Robot Dramas: Autonomous Machines in the Limelight on Stage and in Society

aarondubrow aarondubrow writes  |  about 2 months ago

aarondubrow (1866212) writes "We're entering an era where we'll increasingly coexist with robots and other intelligent machines — some of which may look like us. Not only is there a growing number of industrial robots (about 1.5 million today), there are 10 million Roombas in our homes, porter-bots in our hospitals and hotels, social robots in our nursing homes and even robot spectators at baseball games in Japan, tele-operated by remote fans.

Theater is not an arena that we typically associate with robots, however, artists, musicians and producers are often early adopters and innovative users of emerging technologies. In fact, robots got their name from the 1920 play, R.U.R., by the Czech playwright, Karel Capek. An article in the Huffington Post describes a panel discussion at the National Academy of Science in June that featured the producers of three recent plays that starred robots. The plays highlight our robot anxieties, while offering new visions for human-robot interactions in the future."
top

Enabling a new future for cloud computing

aarondubrow aarondubrow writes  |  about 2 months ago

aarondubrow (1866212) writes "The National Science Foundation today announced two $10 million projects to create cloud computing testbeds — to be called "Chameleon" and "CloudLab" — that will enable the academic research community to experiment with novel cloud architectures and pursue new, architecturally-enabled applications of cloud computing. While most of the original concepts for cloud computing came from the academic research community, as clouds grew in popularity, industry drove much of the design of their architecture. Today's awards complement industry's efforts and enable academic researchers to advance cloud computing architectures that can support a new generation of innovative applications, including real-time and safety-critical applications like those used in medical devices, power grids, and transportation systems."
top

Can our computers continue to get smaller and more powerful?

aarondubrow aarondubrow writes  |  about 2 months ago

aarondubrow (1866212) writes "In a review article in this week's issue of the journal Nature (described in a National Science Foundation press release), Igor Markov of the University of Michigan/Google reviews limiting factors in the development of computing systems to help determine what is achievable, in principle and in practice, using today's and emerging technologies. "Understanding these important limits," says Markov, "will help us to bet on the right new techniques and technologies.""
Link to Original Source
top

Enhancing Safety and Security in a Digital World

aarondubrow aarondubrow writes  |  about 3 months ago

aarondubrow (1866212) writes "As our lives and businesses become ever more intertwined with networked technologies, the nation must continue to improve cybersecurity measures to keep our data, devices and critical systems safe, private and accessible. Yesterday, the National Science Foundation announced two new center-scale "Frontier" awards that address grand challenges in cybersecurity. In particular, they'll support research into modular cloud computing security and "program obfuscation," where an entire program (and not just its output) are encrypted. The awards are part a diverse $74.5 million portfolio that includes more than 225 new projects in 39 states."
top

Taking Great Ideas from the Lab to the Fab

aarondubrow aarondubrow writes  |  about 3 months ago

aarondubrow (1866212) writes "The "valley of death" is well-known to entrepreneurs — the lull between government funding for research and industry support for prototypes and products. To confront this problem, in 2013 the National Science Foundation created a new program called InTrans to extend the life of the most high-impact NSF-funded research and help great ideas transition from lab to practice.Today, in partnership with Intel, NSF announced the first InTrans award of $3 million to a team of researchers who are designing customizable, domain-specific computing technologies for use in healthcare. The work could lead to less exposure to dangerous radiation during x-rays by speeding up the computing side of medicine. It also could result in patient-specific cancer treatments."
Link to Original Source
top

Computing a Cure for HIV

aarondubrow aarondubrow writes  |  about 4 months ago

aarondubrow (1866212) writes "The tendency of HIV to mutate and resist drugs has made it particularly difficult to eradicate. But in the last decade scientists have begun using a new weapon in the fight against HIV: supercomputers. Using some of the nation's most powerful supercomputers, teams of researchers are pushing the limits of what we know about HIV and how we can treat it. The Huffington Post describes nine ways supercomputers are helping scientists understand and treat the disease."
Link to Original Source
top

A High Performance First Year for Stampede

aarondubrow aarondubrow writes  |  about 4 months ago

aarondubrow (1866212) writes "Sometimes, the laboratory just won't cut it. After all, you can't recreate an exploding star, manipulate quarks, or forecast the climate in the lab. In cases like these, scientists rely on supercomputing simulations to capture the physical reality of these phenomena — minus the extraordinary cost, dangerous temperatures or millennium-long wait times. This week, the Texas Advanced Computing Center released a Special Report on Stampede, the 7th most powerful computing system in the world. The report describes 8 example of how scientists are using the supercomputer to make discoveries in genetics, hurricane forecasting, renewable fuels and other fields."
Link to Original Source
top

The Internet's broken. Who's going to invent a new one?

aarondubrow aarondubrow writes  |  about 5 months ago

aarondubrow (1866212) writes "The Internet has evolved to support an incredibly diverse set of needs, but we may be reaching a point at which new solutions and new infrastructure are needed in particular to improve security, connect with the Internet of Things and address an increasingly mobile computing landscape. Today, NSF announced $15 million in awards to develop, deploy and test future Internet architecture in challenging real-world environments. These clean-slate designs explore novel network architectures and networking concepts and also consider the larger societal, economic and legal issues that arise from the interplay between the Internet and society.

Each project will partner with cities, non-profit organizations, academic institutions and industrial partners across the nation to test their Internet architectures. Some of the test environments include: a vehicular network deployment in Pittsburgh, a context-aware weather emergency notification system for Dallas/Fort Worth, and a partnership with Open mHealth, a patient-centric health ecosystem based in San Francisco."

Link to Original Source
top

Making graphene work for real-world devices

aarondubrow aarondubrow writes  |  about 6 months ago

aarondubrow (1866212) writes "Graphene, a one-atom-thick form of the carbon material graphite, is strong, light, nearly transparent and an excellent conductor of electricity and heat, but a number of practical challenges must be overcome before it can emerge as a replacement for silicon in electronics or energy devices. One particular challenge concerns the question of how graphene diffuses heat, in the form of phonons. Thermal conductivity is critical in electronics, especially as components shrink to the nanoscale. Using the Stampede supercomputer at the Texas Advanced Computing Center, Professor Li Shi simulated how phonons (heat-carrying vibrations in solids) scatter as a function of the thickness of the graphene layers. He also investigated how graphene interacts with substrate materials and how phonon scattering can be controlled. The results were published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Applied Physical Letters and Energy and Environmental Science."
Link to Original Source
top

Cosmic Slurp

aarondubrow aarondubrow writes  |  about 6 months ago

aarondubrow (1866212) writes "A “tidal disruption” occurs when a star orbits too close to a black hole and gets sucked in. The phenomenon is accompanied by a bright flare with a unique signature that changes over time. Researchers at the Georgia Institute of Technology are using Stampede and other NSF-supported supercomputers to simulate tidal disruptions in order to better understand the dynamics of the process. Doing so helps astronomers find many more possible candidates of tidal disruptions in sky surveys and will reveal details of how stars and black holes interact."
Link to Original Source
top

Investigating the Dark Matter of Life

aarondubrow aarondubrow writes  |  about a year ago

aarondubrow (1866212) writes "Metagenomics makes it possible to investigate microbes in their natural environments and in the complex communities in which they normally live, but requires massive computing power. Researchers from the J. Craig Ventor Institute used the Ranger supercomputer at TACC to determine the bacterial and viral diversity of the Indian Ocean as part of the Global Ocean Sampling Expedition. They reported their results in PLOS One in October 2012. They are now applying a metagenomic approach to the human esophagus and the microbial imbalances there that may play a role in certain kinds of gastric acid reflux and esophageal cancer."
top

Sculpting Flow

aarondubrow aarondubrow writes  |  about a year ago

aarondubrow (1866212) writes "Researchers reported results in Nature Communications on a new way of sculpting tailor-made fluid flows by placing tiny pillars in microfluidic channels. The method could allow clinicians to better separate white blood cells in a sample, increase mixing in industrial applications, and more quickly perform lab-on-a-chip-type operation. Using the Ranger and Stampede supercomputers, the researchers ran more than 1,000 simulations representing combinations of speeds, thicknesses, heights or offsets that produce unique flows. This library of transformations will help the broader community design and use sculpted fluid flows."
top

"Shields to Maximum, Mr. Scott"

aarondubrow aarondubrow writes  |  about a year ago

aarondubrow (1866212) writes "Researchers at The University of Texas at Austin developed a fundamentally new way of simulating fabric impacts that captures the fragmentation of the projectiles and the shock response of the target. Running hundreds of simulations on supercomputers at the Texas Advanced Computing Center, they assisted NASA in the development of ballistic limit curves that predict whether a shield will be perforated when hit by a projectile of a given size and speed. The framework they developed also allows them to study the impact of projectiles on body armor materials and to predict the response of different fabric weaves upon impact."
top

A Database of Brains

aarondubrow aarondubrow writes  |  about a year ago

aarondubrow (1866212) writes "Researchers recently created OpenfMRI, a web-based, supercomputer-powered tool that makes it easier for researchers to process, share, compare and rapidly analyze fMRI brain scans from many different studies. Applying supercomputing to the fMRI analysis allows researchers to conduct larger studies, test more hypotheses, and accommodate the growing spatial and time resolution of brain scans. The ultimate goal is to collect enough brain data to develop a bottom-up understanding of brain function."
top

When Will My Computer Understand Me?

aarondubrow aarondubrow writes  |  about a year ago

aarondubrow (1866212) writes "For more than 50 years, linguists and computer scientists have tried to get computers to understand human language by programming semantics as software, with mixed results. Enabled by supercomputers at the Texas Advanced Computing Center, University of Texas researchers are using new methods to more accurately represent language so computers can interpret it. Recently, they were awarded a grant from DARPA to combine distributional representation of word meanings with Markov logic networks to better capture the human understanding of language."

Journals

aarondubrow has no journal entries.

Slashdot Login

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?