×

Announcing: Slashdot Deals - Explore geek apps, games, gadgets and more. (what is this?)

Thank you!

We are sorry to see you leave - Beta is different and we value the time you took to try it out. Before you decide to go, please take a look at some value-adds for Beta and learn more about it. Thank you for reading Slashdot, and for making the site better!

Comments

top

Why Scott Adams Wished Death On His Dad

akeeneye Re:oregon has assistant suicide (961 comments)

Washington state has such a law as well - http://www.doh.wa.gov/YouandYourFamily/IllnessandDisease/DeathwithDignityAct.aspx . As does Vermont. I'm under the impression that the laws make it very difficult to get permission to snuff yourself, and that you have to be of reasonably "sound mind", not even depressed(!), to make use of them. So these laws really wouldn't help in the kind of end-of-life situations that most are talking about here, though I'd be happy to be corrected on that.

1 year,19 days
top

Google and Microsoft To Block Child-Abuse Search Terms

akeeneye Re:Depressing job (308 comments)

I think a shittier job would be doing computer forensics. You end up having to see this stuff as well as go testify about it in court. It would become part of your life, inescapable. I'd given some thought to going into forensics but the thought of that deterred me, I don't think I could hack it. I've heard it said that there's a great personal reward in locking up the pervs, but it seems to me it would come at a great personal price. I wonder what the suicide rate is in the profession?

about a year ago
top

Clam That Was Killed Determining Its Age Was Over 100 Years Older Than Estimated

akeeneye Re:mankind is a cancer (366 comments)

“The Earth has a skin and that skin has diseases, one of its diseases is called man.” - attributed to Nietzsche

about a year ago
top

D-Link Router Backdoor Vulnerability Allows Full Access To Settings

akeeneye Re:Different model checked not to be vulnerable (228 comments)

My DIR-601 with firmware 1.02NA does not appear to have this backdoor. I installed the firmware from the D-link website a few weeks ago and it was the latest available at that time.

about a year ago
top

Linus Torvalds Celebrates 20 Years of Windows 3.11 With Linux 3.11-rc5 Launch

akeeneye Re:I feel old (113 comments)

Cassette tape?? You were lucky. We used to *dream* of having cassette tapes. We had it rough. After going to high school for 14 hours a day, day in day out, we had to POKE our machine code into memory, run it, and if the machine didn't crash, had to write another program to PEEK it out again while we took snapshots of the screen with a Polaroid camera.

about a year ago
top

Queen's WWIII Speech Revealed

akeeneye Re:WE ARE THE CHAMPIONS! (147 comments)

I thought EXACTLY the same thing when I read the headline. Those lyrics would have made for an excellent speech along with those of "We Will Rock You".

about a year ago
top

Ad Networks Lay Path To Million-Strong Browser Botnet

akeeneye Re:No Script (105 comments)

The equivalent on Chrome is "NotScripts".

about a year ago
top

Interactive Nukemap Now In 3D

akeeneye Re:Primitive maps (192 comments)

Did you mean "geography"?
I agree, it would be very interesting to have the topologies of hilly areas like Seattle and SF taken into account in the sim. Let's say you set off your nuke over Elliot Bay. Or in a shipping container down on the south end. I wonder if the neighborhoods on the lee side of the central ridge separating the city from the lake would be spared in any big way. Places like Mt. Baker, Leschi, Madison Park. I wonder if N. Queen Anne would be partially spared? It would be ironic if the aquaduct and the 99 bridge survived. Similarly, I wonder if the blast effects would be channeled by the hills, perhaps down the Rainier valley for example.

It would be tragic, a lot of good pubs would be ruined even by a low-yield device.

about a year ago
top

Silicon Valley In 2013 Resembles Logan's Run In 2274

akeeneye Re:Nostalgic wool (432 comments)

Seems to me, in the mid-80s, running CMS in a VM on IBM iron, I could modify, recompile, and reload parts of the network stack as an ordinary user. In my idle hours I believe I poured through some of the spooling code and found where delivery priorities were set. Tweak!

about a year and a half ago
top

How Colleges Are Pushing Out the Poor To Court the Rich

akeeneye Re:Goodbye (668 comments)

I wonder how much you know about Germany? Health insurance is public AND private. You only get to opt-in to a private plan if you make over a certain amount of money. I never said that you didn't have to pay for insurance. But in Germany you pay a % of salary and nobody is uninsured - IIRC if you're poor, the cost of the insurance is subsidized. If there's a smaller # of uni grads in the population (citation needed), maybe more people go into the trades than here, which wouldn't necessarily be a bad thing. Unemployment is much lower in Germany than in, for example, the US.

My point in all this is that being what a US reactionary would consider a "socialist" country does not translate into necessarily having a basket case economy. A prior poster mentioned Canada as a similar example of what a US wingnut would describe as a "socialist country" that's doing relatively well.

about a year and a half ago
top

How Colleges Are Pushing Out the Poor To Court the Rich

akeeneye Re:Goodbye (668 comments)

Germany likewise is roaring along whilst providing worker protections, ensuring that everyone has health insurance, and, if I understand correctly, free university educations for a large segment of the population.

about a year and a half ago
top

How Colleges Are Pushing Out the Poor To Court the Rich

akeeneye Re: Goodbye (668 comments)

I strongly suspect that that's what my wealthy Republican friend will be doing: sending his kids to Socialist in-state public schools (oh the irony). As you say they cost a small fraction of what private unis cost and if I understand correctly the two top schools in Washington state are quite good.

about a year and a half ago
top

How Colleges Are Pushing Out the Poor To Court the Rich

akeeneye Re:Goodbye (668 comments)

His health plan was changed so that his defense-contractor MegaCorp employer, that feeds almost exclusively at the trough of the Socialist military, could make more money. There's absolutely no question that this fantastically huge and wealthy company couldn't have maintained funding for the current plan. They simply chose not to, because In These Tough Economic Times, they can get away with it.

about a year and a half ago
top

How Colleges Are Pushing Out the Poor To Court the Rich

akeeneye Re:Goodbye (668 comments)

Oh there's plenty of social mobility. For most people, it just happens to be downwards. I was surprised to discover recently that a friend of mine, a staunch Republican, had his Cadillac-plan health insurance cut by his defense-contractor employer and replaced with a bare-bones high-deductible plan. The shit is really starting to trickle uphill if it's reached his level. He's got a couple of girls who'll be going to college in a few years so it'll be interesting to see how that plays out, to see how many hundreds of thousands of dollars of debt he'll let them take on.

about a year and a half ago
top

Ask Slashdot: What Magazines Do You Still Read?

akeeneye The Atlantic, Harper's (363 comments)

I really should get a Mother Jones subscription soon. I like getting a couple of thought-provoking mags a month. But I also buy hardback books (used, the older the better). I sometimes wonder if a good tablet would turn me into an online reader, but I don't think so. I like the feel of paper magazines and they're disposable - if I spew food or beer on one while I'm eating+reading, no matter. If I drop a magazine and step on it, it's still good. If I drop a phone or a tablet and step on it, the results are worse. I have data.

about a year and a half ago
top

How Beer Gave Us Civilization

akeeneye Re:Everything gave us civilization (325 comments)

When I spent some time in Germany recently, I could -not- find a decent, hoppy beer. I'm used to, and love, American IPAs. The stronger and more bitter, the better. The closest to that I could find in DE was Jever, and that was just a shadow of the beers that I'm used to. The Bier store people hadn't a clue what I was talking about when I tried to describe massively hoppy beer. I'm tempted to take them some (if that's possible) when I go back. I did read some lamenations in Germany about the state of the brewing scene there. The gist of it seemed to be that the "purity laws" were preventing beer innovation in the country. You're right, the quantity and quality of craft brews here in the US is astonishing. The varieties available seem to have mushroomed over the past few years. Now if only the really innovative stuff came in 12oz bottles instead of $8 20oz bottles.

about 2 years ago
top

The Data That Drove Yahoo's Telecommuting Ban

akeeneye Re:Results-only (529 comments)

I think that one of us is misunderstanding the point of ROWE. To quote from the referenced article:

"“In a Results-Only Work Environment, people can do whatever they want, whenever they want, as long as the work gets done.” This is not simply company-sanctioned flextime. A true ROWE has unlimited paid vacation time, no schedules, no mandatory meetings, and no judgments from co-workers and bosses about how employees spend their days. In other words, managers trust employees to get their work done and do not mandate — or even comment on — when, where, or how it happens. Because everyone is evaluated based on what they accomplish, as opposed to how much time they spend looking busy at their desks, it becomes clear very quickly who is actually getting work done and who isn’t.'

It's not about process or non-process, rules or no rules, standards or no standards. It's about the -manner- in which work gets done. It seems to me you could load as many performance/quality/compliance parameters as you liked into a ROWE-based work culture. You could have processes ... first you do the report, THEN you spell check it, THEN you attach the corporately-mandated coversheet .... even in a ROWE environment. It's not at all clear to me how having to go into an office 9-5 and sit in a cube (or worse, an open floorplan office) is going to help avoid law-breaking or prevent fraud or inhibit any other kind of serious badness that I can think of. I have to believe that the worst corporate offenses in modern times have all been birthed in office settings and probably in very regimented ones as well (banking scandals come to mind).

People ARE doing ROWE increasingly in the form of after-hours work, working from coffeeshops, that sort of thing. If the outputs, the "results", of these endeavors were not valuable and acceptable to their employers then I don't think that people would do this sort of work. If they heard, the morning after a late night working, "Hey cowboy, we can't use the Peterson sales report you put together, you didn't do it here in the office at your desk, how do we know the COO won't land in jail?" then that sort of work would not be happening at all.

You seem to speak of traditional management being about "we've got to watch and control the employees because they're at core a liability". To the extent that ROWE does/would succeed, I think it's because it shifts that mental paradigm to "employees basically want to do good work and contribute and are an asset" and ROWE is a great way to motivate and empower such employees. It requires not just a process shift, but an ideological shift.

To summarize, I don't see how a highly-managed, in-office work environment works to prevent the kinds of problems that you mention. At least not among what most would consider "white collar" employees. Virtually all corporate fraud and abuse to date has been hatched in non-ROWE workplaces. The traditional management approaches carry high costs, both in diminished productivity, and in the productivity-opportunity costs that might result from ROWE-style "empowerment" of employees. I too am a knowledge-worker, and like you I thrive on having autonomy and in being evaluated primarily by the results of my efforts. But I also think that the general approach could be much more widely-applied in the business world and that it's benefits would be immeasurable.

about 2 years ago

Submissions

top

Roomba Violates All Three Laws Of Roombotics

akeeneye akeeneye writes  |  more than 3 years ago

akeeneye (1788292) writes ""I hardly even see it any more, but I know it's around," Graney said. "I hear its horrible brushes at night."
"The troubled homeowner now fears that he is living on borrowed time, saying that "it's only a matter of days, if not hours" before the still-unaccounted-for Roomba will target him."

Does anybody have one of these infernal machines? How well does it work, at least when it's not plotting your demise?"

Link to Original Source
top

WikiLeaks Leaves Amazon

akeeneye akeeneye writes  |  about 4 years ago

akeeneye (1788292) writes "Amazon dumps Wikileaks that is. The Huffington Post reports:
"Amazon.com Inc. forced WikiLeaks to stop using the U.S. company's computers to distribute embarrassing State Department communications and other documents"
I'm embarrassed to be an Amazon customer at this point."

Link to Original Source

Journals

akeeneye has no journal entries.

Slashdot Login

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?