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Flatlining User Base May Spell End of RIM

alphadogg Add me to the RIM refugees list (180 comments)

Have stuck it out long enough. I don't even mind the lack of apps, it's the lack of even halfway decent web access that is the killer for me. Contract ends in December, time to move on

about a year and a half ago
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James Bond can't wait for iPhone 5, using Sony phone in "Skyfall"

alphadogg Re:So, just how many (2 comments)

I'm actually one of the BlackBerry survivors (maybe not for long), so have no stake in promoting iPhones or Sony products... just figured people might be interested in the tech placement

about a year and a half ago
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I most recently switched ISPs ...

alphadogg RCN to Verizon (250 comments)

Held on to RCN as long as we could, to fight the man, but eventually caved to Verizon for the phone etc bundle

about a year and a half ago
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Rob "CmdrTaco" Malda Resigns From Slashdot

alphadogg comments comments comments (1521 comments)

Best thing to me about CmdrTaco's Slashdot has been the site's unique ability to generate comments in quantity (and sometimes quality) unlike I've seen on any other website. Wishing Rob the best on his next venture

more than 2 years ago

Submissions

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Akamai admits its OpenSSL patch was faulty, reissues keys

alphadogg alphadogg writes  |  3 days ago

alphadogg (971356) writes "Akamai Technologies, whose network handles up to 30% of all Internet traffic, said Sunday a researcher found a fault in custom code that the company thought shielded most of its customers from the Heartbleed bug. As a result, Akamai is now reissuing all SSL certificates and security keys used to create encrypted connections between its customer's websites and visitors to those sites. "In short, we had a bug," wrote Andy Ellis, Akamai's CTO, in a blog post. https://blogs.akamai.com/2014/..."
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Edward Sharpe & the Magnetic Zeros singer leads digital tax revolt

alphadogg alphadogg writes  |  3 days ago

alphadogg (971356) writes "Alex Ebert, whose band Edward Sharpe & the Magnetic Zeros is best known for its song "Home," is promoting a new website that lets Americans visualize where their tax dollars go vs. where they wish the money would go. TheNewIRS.com http://thenewirs.com/taxplan/n... team actually compliments Whitehouse.gov for providing “a great interactive webpage to see what tax money goes towards on a national level,” but faults it for only letting you see what happens after the fact. The goal of TheNewIRS.com site is to let tax filers find out whether their wishes for where tax dollars go after this year’s April 15 filing deadline match up with reality. TheNewIRS.com concept was conceived by Ebert at the Sundance Film Festival’s “Hackdance” hackathon."
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Wi-Fi problems dog Apple-Samsung trial

alphadogg alphadogg writes  |  5 days ago

alphadogg (971356) writes "There's a new sign on the door to Courtroom 5 at the federal courthouse in San Jose, the home to the Apple v. Samsung battle that's playing out this month: "Please turn off all cell phones." For a trial that centers on smartphones and the technology they use, it's more than a little ironic. The entire case might not even be taking place if the market wasn't so big and important, but the constant need for connectivity of everyone is causing problems in the court, hence the new sign. The problems have centered on the system that displays the court reporter's real-time transcription onto monitors on the desks of Judge Lucy Koh, the presiding judge in the case, and the lawyers of Apple and Samsung. The system, it seems, is connected via Wi-Fi and that connection keeps failing."
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Canada halts online tax returns in wake of Heartbleed

alphadogg alphadogg writes  |  about a week ago

alphadogg (971356) writes "Canada Revenue Agency has halted online filing of tax returns by the country's citizens following the disclosure of the Heartbleed security vulnerability that rocked the Internet this week. The country's Minister of National Revenue wrote in a Twitter message https://twitter.com/KerryLynne... on Wednesday that interest and penalties will not be applied to those filing 2013 tax returns after April 30, the last date for filing the returns, for a period equal to the length of the service disruption. The agency has suspended public access to its online services as a preventive measure to protect the information it holds, while it investigates the potential impact on tax payer information, it said."
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Linus Torvalds suspends key Linux developer

alphadogg alphadogg writes  |  about two weeks ago

alphadogg (971356) writes "An argument between developers of some of the most basic parts of Linux turned heated this week, resulting in a prominent Red Hat employee and code contributor being banned from working on the Linux kernel. Kay Sievers, a well-known open-source software engineer, is a key developer of systemd, a system management framework for Linux-based operating systems. Systemd is currently used by several prominent Linux distributions, including two of the most prominent enterprise distros, Red Hat and SUSE. It was recently announced that Ubuntu would adopt systemd in future versions as well. Sievers was banned by kernel maintainer Linus Torvalds on Wednesday for failing to address an issue that caused systemd to interact with the Linux kernel in negative ways."
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Apple, cloud computing take the blame in new "Sex Tape" movie

alphadogg alphadogg writes  |  about two weeks ago

alphadogg (971356) writes "You'd almost think Apple rival Samsung underwrote the upcoming movie "Sex Tape" when you see the just released NSFW trailer. https://www.youtube.com/watch?... A couple, played by Cameron Diaz and Jason Segel, have their life turned upside down after they record a sex tape that then spreads through iCloud to a bunch of iPads they've given as gifts to family, friends and even the mailman. Poignant questions asked in the aftermath of the sex tape seeping onto the cloud include: "How the hell do you get it back?" and "You know the cloud?" (to which Diaz's character replies @*$)#&!"
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Oracle overtakes IBM as second-largest software vendor, Gartner says

alphadogg alphadogg writes  |  about two weeks ago

alphadogg (971356) writes "Oracle has overtaken rival IBM as the world's second-largest software vendor by pulling in $29.6 billion in software revenue during 2013, according to analyst firm Gartner. "Global trends around big data and analytics with business investment in database and cloud-based applications helped to drive Oracle's top-line growth," Gartner research vice president Chad Eschinger said in a statement. Microsoft retained its first-place ranking, at $65.7 billion in software revenue, while IBM moved down to third place with $29.1 billion. SAP remained in fourth place, at $18.5 billion, Gartner said."
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Smartphone kill-switch could save consumers $2.6B per year, says report

alphadogg alphadogg writes  |  about two weeks ago

alphadogg (971356) writes "Technology that remotely makes a stolen smartphone useless could save American consumers up to $2.6 billion per year if it is implemented widely and leads to a reduction in theft of phones, according to a new report. Law enforcement officials and politicians are pressuring cellular carriers to make such technology standard on all phones shipped in the U.S. in response to the increasing number of smartphone thefts. They believe the so-called "kill switch" would reduce the number of thefts if stolen phones were routinely locked so they became useless. But carriers have resisted these requests and there are now bills proposed at the U.S. Senate, U.S. House of Representatives and California State Senate that would mandate such a system. The report, by William Duckworth, an associate professor of statistics, data science and analytics at Creighton University, found most of the savings for consumers would come from reduced insurance premiums."
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Lawyers talk of settlement in Silicon Valley employee-poaching case

alphadogg alphadogg writes  |  about three weeks ago

alphadogg (971356) writes "Attorneys say they're making progress toward a possible settlement in Silicon Valley's employee poaching case, in which Google, Apple and other companies are accused of conspiring not to hire employees from other tech giants. During a hearing on Thursday in a San Jose court, attorneys on both sides said they were working daily with a mediator to resolve the dispute, which involves alleged secret agreements among the firms not to poach each other's workers. Those agreements would violate federal antitrust laws. The case dates back to 2011, when Silicon Valley software engineers alleged that Adobe Systems, Apple, Google, Intuit, Intel, Lucasfilm and Pixar engaged in an "overarching conspiracy" to fix and suppress employee compensation and to restrict employees' mobility. The class covered by the suit is estimated at 60,000 workers."
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"Cloud Week" continues: Google slashes cloud service prices

alphadogg alphadogg writes  |  about three weeks ago

alphadogg (971356) writes "Google has revamped its portfolio of enterprise cloud services, by cutting prices, adding new features, and touting a refreshed enthusiasm for the cloud market. "We have been very seriously committed to the cloud as a business and product family," one executive said, noting that Google now runs over 4.75 million active applications on its services. Cloud Storage is now priced at $0.026 cents per GB per month, and $0.020 cents per GB per month for an option with reduced availability, regardless of the amount of data stored. Formerly, the company had a number of pricing tiers for storage, based on the amount of data being stored. Prices previously ranged from $0.085 per GB per month to $0.054 per GB per month. Google's news follows Cisco's pledge to put $1B into cloud services, http://www.networkworld.com/co... while Microsoft's new CEO Satya Nadella on Thursday is expected to make a big cloud announcement. http://www.networkworld.com/ne..."
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Speedy attack targets Web servers with outdated Linux kernels

alphadogg alphadogg writes  |  about a month ago

alphadogg (971356) writes "Web servers running a long-outdated version of the Linux kernel were attacked with dramatic speed over two days last week, according to Cisco Systems. All the affected servers were running the 2.6 version, first released in December 2003. "When attackers discover a vulnerability in the system, they can exploit it at their whim without fear of it being remedied," Cisco said. After the Web server has been compromised, the attackers slip in a line of JavaScript to other JavaScript files within the website. That code bounces the website's visitors to a second compromised host. "The two-stage process allows attackers to serve up a variety of malicious content to the visitor," according to Cisco. http://blogs.cisco.com/securit..."
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"Nobel Prize in Computing" goes to distributed computing wrangler Leslie Lamport

alphadogg alphadogg writes  |  about a month ago

alphadogg (971356) writes "Leslie Lamport, a Microsoft Research principal, has been named the winner of the 2013 ACM A.M. Turing Award, http://amturing.acm.org/ also known as the “Nobel Prize in Computing.” The computer scientist was recognized by the Association for Computing Machinery for “imposing clear, well-defined coherence on the seemingly chaotic behavior of distributed computing systems, in which several autonomous computers communicate with each other by passing messages.” His algorithms, models and verification systems have enabled distributed computer systems to play the key roles they’re used in throughout the data center, security and cloud computing landscapes."
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Best Ways to Celebrate International Pi Day 2014

alphadogg alphadogg writes  |  about a month ago

alphadogg (971356) writes "It’s the holiday for every mathematician small and large: Pi Day. If you’re not familiar, math enthusiasts around the world embrace March 14 to commemorate the mathematical constant. No matter the size of the circle, the ratio of its circumference to its diameter will always be 3.14. What better way to celebrate this than on 3/14? Here are fashion, food, activities and more to get you into the spirit."
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Computer science enrollments rocketed last year, up 22%

alphadogg alphadogg writes  |  about a month ago

alphadogg (971356) writes "A sneak peek at the annual Computing Research Association's (CRA) report on computer science enrollments at colleges shows that strong demand for technically-savvy workers is luring students in a big way. The full 2013 Taulbee Report will be published in May, but the CRA revealed a few tidbits this week in its Computer Research News publication. http://cra.org/resources/crn-o... Among the findings: Among 123 departments responding last year and the year before, there was a 22% increase in enrollment for computer science bachelor’s degree programs at U.S. schools. Degrees awarded increased 0.9% and new enrollments rose 13.7%"
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Facebook walks on optical networking's wild side

alphadogg alphadogg writes  |  about a month ago

alphadogg (971356) writes "As a company that draws more than 2 billion eyeballs per month, Facebook was a fitting harbinger of trends to come at an optical networking conference. The social networking goliath is lighting up its own optical fiber, deploying 100Gbps links in its data centers and looking towards emerging silicon photonics technology, Facebook Director of Technical Operations Najam Ahmad said this week at an Optical Society of America meeting held alongside the annual Optical Fiber Communications Conference in San Francisco. Facebook's challenges mirror those of other enterprises and data center operators, with fast-growing data traffic and rapidly evolving network needs, but with 1.2 billion active monthly users, it's facing those issues sooner than some. Though his company is unique in some ways, Ahmad's comments in an on-stage interview may shed some light on the future of connectivity."
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Stanford team tries for zippier Wi-Fi in crowded buildings

alphadogg alphadogg writes  |  about a month and a half ago

alphadogg (971356) writes "Having lots of Wi-Fi networks packed into a condominium or apartment building can hurt everyone's wireless performance, but Stanford University researchers say they've found a way to turn crowding into an advantage. In a dorm on the Stanford campus, they're building a single, dense Wi-Fi infrastructure that each resident can use and manage like their own private network. That means the shared system, called BeHop, can be centrally managed for maximum performance and efficiency while users still assign their own SSIDs, passwords and other settings. The Stanford project is making this happen with inexpensive, consumer-grade access points and SDN (software-defined networking)."
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Second federal 'kill-switch' bill introduced targeting smartphone theft

alphadogg alphadogg writes  |  about a month and a half ago

alphadogg (971356) writes "A second federal bill that proposes "kill-switch" technology be made mandatory in smartphones as a means to reduce theft of the devices was introduced Monday. The kill switch would allow consumers to remotely wipe and disable a stolen smartphone and is considered by proponents to be a key tool in combating the increasing number of smartphone robberies. The Smartphone Theft Prevention Act was introduced into the U.S. House of Representatives as H.R. 4065 by Jose Serrano, a New York Democrat, as a companion to a Senate bill that was introduced Feb. 13. The two follow a similar law proposed by officials in California last month."
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Cisco offers $300,000 prize for Internet of Things security apps

alphadogg alphadogg writes  |  about a month and a half ago

alphadogg (971356) writes "Cisco today kicked off a contest with $300,000 in prize money that challenges security experts around the world to put together ways to secure what's now called the "Internet of Things," the wide range of non-traditional computing devices used on the electric grid, in healthcare and many other industries.

A Cisco SVP concluded his keynote at this week's RSA Conference by announcing what he called the “Internet of Things Security Grand Challenge.” http://blogs.cisco.com/securit... Christopher Young said the idea is “a contest of experts around the world to submit blueprints” for how security issues created by the Internet of Things could be addressed. It’s expected that up to six winning entries would be selected and the prize money awarded at the Internet of Things Forum in the fall."

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Snowden's NSA leaks gave IETF a needed security wake-up call, Chairman says

alphadogg alphadogg writes  |  about a month and a half ago

alphadogg (971356) writes "Security and how to protect users from pervasive monitoring will dominate the proceedings when members of Internet Engineering Task Force meet in London starting Sunday. For an organization that develops the standards we all depend on for the Internet to work, the continued revelations made by NSA whistleblower Edward Snowden have had wide-ranging repercussions. "It wasn't a surprise that some activities like this are going on. I think that the scale and some of the tactics surprised the community a little bit. ... You could also argue that maybe we needed the wake-up call," said IETF Chairman Jari Arkko. Part of that work will also be to make security features easier to use and for the standards organization to think of security from day one when developing new protocols."
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Bruce Schneier, others ask:Are Apple iOS, OS X flaws really backdoors for spies?

alphadogg alphadogg writes  |  about 2 months ago

alphadogg (971356) writes "Two recently-discovered flaws in Apple iOS and Mac OS X have security experts openly asking whether the software vulnerabilities represent backdoors inserted for purposes of cyber-espionage. “One line of code—was it an accident or enemy action? I don’t know, but it’s the kind of bug I’d put in,” remarked Bruce Schneier, chief technology officer at Co3 Systems, about the flaw in Apple OS X SSL encryption that was revealed last week. Schneier, a cryptography expert, alluded to the Apple SSL flaw during his presentation on government surveillance this week at the RSA Conference in San Francisco. The point, he says, is that the U.S. National Security Agency as well as other governments involved in aggressive mass surveillance are going to take any means necessary, including finding ways to put backdoors into commercial products, such as by code tampering. A FireEye researcher posed similar questions about the recently revealed iOS flaw."
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