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Reaction To the Sony Hack Is 'Beyond the Realm of Stupid'

amicusNYCL Re:Yup, Hegel 101 (573 comments)

Then Sony should have stood their ground and let those theaters take the heat instead. Other smaller theaters would have probably stepped up and shown it, and the public probably would have responded by going out to see a movie that they wouldn't have otherwise seen just to give a big middle finger to the attackers.

2 days ago
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Reaction To the Sony Hack Is 'Beyond the Realm of Stupid'

amicusNYCL Re:Land of the free (573 comments)

Any one sane doesn't like armed-to-the-teeth wanna-be vigilantes walking around with an axe to grind.

I agree, and it's difficult to find a practical reason why someone would need to walk around with more than 1 gun on them, or a long arm that isn't easy to handle. I live in Arizona, and it's not all that uncommon to see people walking around with a handgun in the open (and I imagine far more people have them concealed), but I've never seen anyone walking around with a rifle or shotgun outside of hunting. There's just no reason for it. Not that it necessarily needs to be illegal, but people just don't have a daily reason to do it. If someone was walking around with an assault rifle slung across their back they're more likely to get made fun of by people with a little P228 or .38 or something in their pocket.

2 days ago
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Reaction To the Sony Hack Is 'Beyond the Realm of Stupid'

amicusNYCL Re:Land of the free (573 comments)

This city has some of the toughest gun laws in the country, but it literately is a warzone.

You're stretching the literal definition of war with that claim.

2 days ago
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Reaction To the Sony Hack Is 'Beyond the Realm of Stupid'

amicusNYCL Re:Land of the free (573 comments)

That may be true but a key difference in the US is that gun rights are codified into law and in the culture. What is the "Wild West" without guns? In Arizona, to this day, you can walk into a bank with a gun with no problems.

You can't walk with a gun into any business that has a sign saying that firearms are not allowed, even if you have a concealed carry permit. Convenience stores post those signs, if a bank (or any other business) wants to make it illegal to walk in there with a gun then all they need to do is put a sign up. A business without a sign can still ask you to remove your gun provided that they have a secure place for you to store it while you're there. There are other places where you're not allowed to carry a concealed weapon, for example within a certain range of a school. You're never allowed to bring a weapon to a polling place on the day of the election. You also can't walk into Palo Verde Nuclear Generating Station with a gun, or secured areas of the airport, or a jail. You can walk into a bar with a gun as long as the owner doesn't prohibit it, but you can't drink alcohol with a gun on you.

But you know what's prohibited here? Nunchucks. That's not a joke, either. You can walk down the street without a license carrying a loaded shotgun in each hand, handguns strapped all over your waist and legs, and rifles slung over your back, but nunchucks are illegal. We need to draw the line somewhere. This isn't the wild west any more.

2 days ago
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Reaction To the Sony Hack Is 'Beyond the Realm of Stupid'

amicusNYCL Re:Land of the free (573 comments)

I just have to wonder if it's not just a PR stunt.

I think it's much more likely that Sony is trying to shift media attention away from all of the information that was leaked, and onto the story of the threats and the movie. Pulling the movie all of a sudden makes the threats seem much more credible, and now that's what the media is talking about. The real story here is all of the data that was stolen from Sony, like the story about them wanting to go after DNS to take down piracy websites. The movie isn't the story, but that's where the narrative is being steered.

2 days ago
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Reaction To the Sony Hack Is 'Beyond the Realm of Stupid'

amicusNYCL Re:Yup, Hegel 101 (573 comments)

it's been quite fun to watch this event transform from "Fuck Sony" to our ever present "Oh Noez! A bogey man" dialectic

I haven't moved on from the "Fuck Sony" part yet. Especially after they pulled the movie. The article that the summary links to is the first response to this that actually makes sense. Every other response from every talking head, or politician, or executive, has been completely fucking stupid. There's not really another way to say it. It's just moronic.

2 days ago
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Reaction To the Sony Hack Is 'Beyond the Realm of Stupid'

amicusNYCL Re:Land of the free (573 comments)

Yep pretty much. Just because someone is robbing you doesn't mean there is a need to kill them.

Correct, but you can go in and confront them, because you don't want them taking your stuff. They are invading your property. Have you ever experienced a break-in where people that you don't know are going through all of your stuff deciding what they want to take? It's a pretty vulnerable feeling, you feel violated after that. Why let someone do that to you? Why roll over just because they decide to break a window and come in your house? Why not stand up to them and tell them that they aren't going to be taking anything? They very well might have a weapon on them, so you defending your house and your property and your family isn't going to carry a ton of weight with them unless you can back things up with force. If they decide to back down and leave, great, you don't have to kill them. If they decide to pull their weapon over your TV, then they've made the decision to escalate things.

Hopefully your solution isn't to let people roam through your house and do whatever they want, and you'll just call insurance. Make sure to inform your family that if they see anyone in the house stealing things, the proper response is to just get out of their way and try to make a note of what they're taking. Hopefully they decide that the only things they want to take are material goods.

2 days ago
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Keurig 2.0 Genuine K-Cup Spoofing Vulnerability

amicusNYCL Re:But does it report artificially low ink levels? (270 comments)

So before Keurig came along, coffee was limited to only a handful of flavors and was difficult to find? And Keurig solved this problem, but no other coffee maker has, so the best solution is to buy a consumer-screwing machine?

about two weeks ago
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AdNauseam Browser Extension Quietly Clicks On Blocked Ads

amicusNYCL Re:Could make user vulnerable to data loss ? (285 comments)

Or how about an ad that has a button "I agree to upload my address book" ?

As with many "good" ideas, the big problems are often due to the unintended consequences and responses.

What? You've discovered a way for Javascript code to access someone's "address book" and upload it without any further prompting from the user? And this is a real problem rather than some hypothetical issue that would never happen?

about two weeks ago
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Trains May Soon Come Equipped With Debris-Zapping Lasers

amicusNYCL Re:Calibration (194 comments)

Ablation can in theory remove single atomic layers with thermal damage only a few atoms deep to the underlying surface.

So the damage to the surface is only a few times larger than what was removed?

about two weeks ago
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Apple Accused of Deleting Songs From iPods Without Users' Knowledge

amicusNYCL Re:Can we hold the froth first? (250 comments)

If this is a case of what it's being made to sound to be, that actual non-DRM, legally purchased files got burnt out? I don't believe said things existed at the time, did they?

You realize that DRM came after the MP3 format, right? And, in fact, that DRM was basically a direct response to people making and sharing MP3 files over services like Napster? I have a small library of fantastic 56kbps quality MP3 files because I sat there and loaded each CD into my computer, played it back and recorded the audio going out, then chopped up that giant audio track into the individual songs. Eventually I found a tool that wouldn't involve me sitting there until the CD finished playing.

So, if I loaded all of those MP3s that I made myself onto my iPod, you're saying that it's ok for Apple to delete them?

about two weeks ago
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Technical Hitches Delay Orion Capsule's First Launch

amicusNYCL Re:Orion to Mars (71 comments)

I think anything short of a cruise ship would get cramped on a mission to Mars.

about two weeks ago
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Dragon Age: Inquisition Reviewed and Benchmarked

amicusNYCL Re:Support the developers! (91 comments)

Should they be rewarded for their hard work? I don't know, I remember a couple years ago that I had my mind made up that I would not be buying the last Dragon Age because of the behavior of EA. You don't think I've forgotten that, do you? I was angry enough at EA then to decide that I wouldn't buy any more of their games, even though I had a lot of fun with the first 2 Dragon Age games, so why would I open my wallet to them now? What, because a couple years have gone by?

about two weeks ago
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Gangnam Style Surpasses YouTube's 32-bit View Counter

amicusNYCL Re:numbering (164 comments)

Whoever has the second most viewed video on YouTube probably cares.

about two weeks ago
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Pizza Hut Tests New "Subconscious Menu" That Reads Your Mind

amicusNYCL Re:Dumb idea (186 comments)

Tracking what I look at or how long I'm looking at it isn't representative of my decision making process.

How do you know that? Are you really all that sure that your eyes don't look at something that you enjoy for a tenth of a second longer than when looking at things you don't enjoy?

about two weeks ago
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18th Century Law Dredged Up To Force Decryption of Devices

amicusNYCL Re:5th Admendment? (446 comments)

I'd say your drop of the rest of the sentence there was its own problem.

I addressed the rest of his question near the end of my response.

about three weeks ago
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18th Century Law Dredged Up To Force Decryption of Devices

amicusNYCL Re:5th Admendment? (446 comments)

George Washington the aristocratic slaveholder who crushed the Whiskey Rebellion

You have to be joking.

President Washington, confronted with what appeared to be an armed insurrection in western Pennsylvania, proceeded cautiously. Although determined to maintain government authority, he did not want to alienate public opinion. He asked his cabinet for written opinions about how to deal with the crisis. The cabinet recommended the use of force, except for Secretary of State Edmund Randolph, who urged reconciliation. Washington did both: he sent commissioners to meet with the rebels while raising a militia army.

Yeah, sounds pretty tyrannical to me.

Before troops could be raised, the Militia Act of 1792 required a justice of the United States Supreme Court to certify that law enforcement was beyond the control of local authorities. On 4 August 1794, Justice James Wilson delivered his opinion that western Pennsylvania was in a state of rebellion. On 7 August, Washington issued a presidential proclamation announcing, with "the deepest regret", that the militia would be called out to suppress the rebellion. He commanded insurgents in western Pennsylvania to disperse by September 1.

Look at all that tyranny, what with the due process and everything.

In early August 1794, Washington dispatched three commissioners, all of them Pennsylvanians, to the west: Attorney General William Bradford, Justice Jasper Yeates of the Pennsylvania Supreme Court, and Senator James Ross. Beginning on 21 August, the commissioners met with a committee of westerners that included Brackenridge and Gallatin. The government commissioners told the committee that it must unanimously agree to renounce violence and submit to U.S. laws, and that a popular referendum must be held to determine if the local people supported the decision. Those who agreed to these terms would be given amnesty from further prosecution.

Because nothing says "tyranny" like "popular referendum".

The total human cost of the "crushing" of the Whiskey Rebellion? 3 or 4 deaths (literally), which occurred in the years prior to Washington getting involved, along with 2 civilians who were killed when the militia was being raised. What did the tyrant Washington do about the civilian deaths? He probably held them up as examples of why you shouldn't resist, or maybe had them quartered and the body parts sent to the revolting counties, right?

Two civilians were killed in these operations. On 29 September, an unarmed boy was shot by an officer whose pistol accidentally fired. Two days later, a man was stabbed to death by a soldier while resisting arrest. President Washington ordered the arrest of the two soldiers and had them turned over to civilian authorities. A state judge determined the deaths had been accidental, and the soldiers were released.

Yeah, some fucking tyrant.

The Washington administration's suppression of the Whiskey Rebellion met with widespread popular approval. The episode demonstrated the new national government had the willingness and ability to suppress violent resistance to its laws. It was therefore viewed by the Washington administration as a success, a view that has generally been endorsed by historians.

Historians not including noted 18th century constitutional scholar Mr. Slippery.

The Rebellion raised the question of what kinds of protests were permissible under the new Constitution. Legal historian Christian G. Fritz argued, even after ratification of the Constitution, there was not yet a consensus about sovereignty in the United States. Federalists believed the government was sovereign because it had been established by the people, so radical protest actions, which were permissible during the American Revolution, were no longer legitimate. But the Whiskey Rebels and their defenders believed the Revolution had established the people as a "collective sovereign", and the people had the collective right to change or challenge the government through extraconstitutional means.

"Extraconstitutional means" are traditionally frowned upon in this country. The Whiskey Rebellion is one of the reasons why.

Yeah, he really "crushed" those rebels, all right. So much so that by the time he led the militia into Western Pennsylvania all of the rebels had dispersed and there was no actual confrontation.

screwing over farmers (including many Revolutionary War vets) to pay off bondholders

Don't worry, they didn't pay the taxes anyway. The government couldn't collect them. The law was repealed a few years later.

Incidentally, what do you think the government should have done in the face of debts incurred from the Revolutionary War? Apparently taxes aren't the solution, so what would you have done, oh wise and benevolent ruler?

Washington was the only major slave holder among the seven Founding Fathers to emancipate his slaves. His will provided for freeing his slaves upon the death of his widow Martha Washington, but she emancipated them about 12 months after his death. At various times in his life, Washington privately expressed strong support for the gradual abolition of slavery.

He privately opposed slavery as an institution which he viewed as economically unsound and morally indefensible. He also regarded the divisiveness of his countrymen's feelings about slavery as a potentially mortal threat to the unity of the nation. Yet, as general of the army, president of the Constitutional Convention, and the first president of the United States, he never publicly challenged the institution of slavery, possibly because he wanted to avoid provoking a split in the new republic over so inflammatory an issue.

Washington was really a dick, wasn't he?

about three weeks ago
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FBI: Wiper Malware Has Korean Language Packs, Hard Coded Targets

amicusNYCL Re:As a malware analyst... (81 comments)

"Just as likely"? I would imagine that, among all of the versions of Windows that have the Korean language installed, the vast majority of them are being used by Koreans rather than English-speaking Americans.

about three weeks ago
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18th Century Law Dredged Up To Force Decryption of Devices

amicusNYCL Re:Well, obviously (446 comments)

And now try to word that in a way that a judge can understand

OK, start with an analogy of a company that manufactures locks without keys.

about three weeks ago

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