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Comments

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The Case That Apple Should Buy Nokia

amliebsch Re:One more thing... (286 comments)

Actually HTC is making the "signature" WP8 devices, not Nokia.

about 2 years ago
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Toyota Abandons Plans For All-Electric Vehicle Rollout

amliebsch Re:Trailer-generators (490 comments)

Another disadvantage: the time when you would most want to tow something else, like an actual trailer or a boat - on a longer trip - you can't, because you're towing part of your car instead. There's also the issue of safety: trailers are terrible for handling and make driving, dangerously lethal as it already is, even more difficult.

about 2 years ago
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Richard Branson 'Determined To Start a Population On Mars'

amliebsch Re:How much dough does this man have!? (266 comments)

He actually started the space company because nobody would provide him with a rocket cheaply enough to launch his greenhouse. So, he decided he would have to do it himself.

about 2 years ago
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How the Critics of the Apollo Program Were Proven Wrong

amliebsch Re:Good to keep in mind (421 comments)

There's no inherent reason you *have* to rebuild everything, it's just that our resuable designs are not sufficiently advanced. Early jet engines had to be rebuilt after almost every flight; but after a few decades of refinement, they can operate almost continuously for months without major maintenance.

about 2 years ago
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Microsoft Reaffirms Default Do-Not-Track For IE10, Windows 8 Express Setup

amliebsch Re:boo! (184 comments)

I doubt it. I mean, I asm certain that most people value their privacy. They just don't value it all that highly. The first time frozen pizzas go on sale 5/$10, most people will conclude that it's worth the price.

about 2 years ago
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Sci-Fi Writers of the Past Predict Life In 2012

amliebsch Re:My prediction (179 comments)

You're on to something, but I think it's simply a case of chronological proximity bias. The problems we face today always *feel* like the most severe problems ever faced, but that is probably often just because they are the most prominent in our minds. I mean, look how many writers from the last century predicted widespread famine, because when you ran the numbers it just didn't seem possible. They thought it was the biggest problem humanity ever faced. Eventually we managed to overcome it and now it feels like a big nothing. Instead we have our own, new, biggest problems humanity has ever faced. Except they're not, not really. They just seem that way because we know that the other ones got solved, and we don't know yet how to solve the unsolved ones. And those writers, in turn, were probably overestimating the relative severity of that problem compared to other historical problems.

It's the same perspective problem that causes doomsdayism.

about 2 years ago
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UEFI Secure Boot and Linux: Where Things Stand

amliebsch Re:Option #X: Buy Win8 laptop, return it the next (521 comments)

If enough manufacturers are seeing this reason for return and losing money because of it, you can be sure they'll start charging restock fees.

FTFY.

about 2 years ago
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UEFI Secure Boot and Linux: Where Things Stand

amliebsch Re:Thin edge of the wedge. (521 comments)

The point is that there is nothing that will be preventing you from doing whatever you want to the hardware you bought: hack it, wipe it, blend it, nobody will stop you. What you are actually complaining about is that the hardware you bought isn't exactly the hardware you want. But, it's a lot harder to blame other people for the poor purchasing decision you made.

about 2 years ago
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Entangled Particles Break Classical Law of Thermodynamics, Say Physicists

amliebsch Re:Simple adjustment: (222 comments)

Honest to god, real-life spit-take. Keyboard's okay, though, it's a Model M.

about 2 years ago
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Entangled Particles Break Classical Law of Thermodynamics, Say Physicists

amliebsch Re:ZPE (222 comments)

There's already an entire website specifically for that purpose.

about 2 years ago
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Entangled Particles Break Classical Law of Thermodynamics, Say Physicists

amliebsch Re:Article title (222 comments)

Thank you, Dr. Science.

about 2 years ago
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Entangled Particles Break Classical Law of Thermodynamics, Say Physicists

amliebsch Re:Would not one have to spend energy... (222 comments)

I don't recall the specific physics principle, but it is something along the lines of 'particles below a certain size cannot be measured without affecting their behavior'.

It's the Heisenberg uncertainty principle. However, by reversing the polarity of the entangled particles and running them through the matrix field of a Heisenberg compensator, you get a controlled tachyon burst that counteracts entropy. At least, that's what I gathered from this write-up.

about 2 years ago
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Ask Slashdot: Is There a Professional Geek Dress Code?

amliebsch Re:The best is when people break the stereotype. (432 comments)

No, no, you want to say "serious business." Mirrored shades, porn 'stache, aloha shirt, silk sport coat, and a concealed smartphone holster.

about 2 years ago
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Ask Slashdot: Is There a Professional Geek Dress Code?

amliebsch Re:Your staff (432 comments)

That would be great! Get them with the cursive name patches, too. And might as well strap on elbow pads by default for working under the desks!

about 2 years ago
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Ask Slashdot: Is There a Professional Geek Dress Code?

amliebsch Re:Look to Gene Kranz (432 comments)

You know, I'm not sure if there was an explicit dress code beyond "shirt and tie," or if it was simply a case of everybody following Kranz's lead. I'm fairly certain that engineers were originally expected to wear suits, but somewhere along the line that rule was relaxed and short sleeves permitted due to the heat generated by all the equipment.

about 2 years ago
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Ask Slashdot: Is There a Professional Geek Dress Code?

amliebsch Look to Gene Kranz (432 comments)

Mission control, 1960's, shall forever be the exemplar of true nerd fashion. However, in a bow to modernity, the pocket slide rule could probably be replaced with a smartphone.

about 2 years ago
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Windows 8 Graphics: Microsoft Has Hardware-Accelerated Everything

amliebsch Re:Maybe it's just me (563 comments)

The difference is how much rendering is done by vertex and pixel shaders, and how much is pre-rendered by the CPU and blitted to the GPU as a texture. Ideally you want as much of the former as you can.

about 2 years ago
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Windows 8 Graphics: Microsoft Has Hardware-Accelerated Everything

amliebsch Re:crash faster (563 comments)

[string]::join(" ",(get-content file.txt)) -replace "[^[a-z]"," " -split " " | group-object | sort-object -desc Count

about 2 years ago
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The 300 km/h Superbus

amliebsch Re:Ok... (180 comments)

Or, if you want to get really crazy sci-fi, a kind of jet-powered "superbus" made out of lightweight materials like composites and aluminum, that travels above the roads and doesn't require any infrastructure between the start and end points at all! It could go much faster and could travel in direct routes, disregarding terrain altogether. Maybe someday...

about 2 years ago
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Making Saltwater Drinkable With Graphene

amliebsch Re:A foul subject. (303 comments)

Salt? That goes on the fries, of course.

about 2 years ago

Submissions

amliebsch hasn't submitted any stories.

Journals

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The military dictatorship everyone loves

amliebsch amliebsch writes  |  more than 8 years ago Somebody made a snarky comment along the lines of how eevil bushitler would ban Star Trek transporters because they are too dangerous. I posted the following response:

This is why the Federation, by the time of Picard, has devolved into a totalitarian military dictatorship. The only apparent choices, when confronted with the discovery of technology as dangerous as matter transportation and mass-energy conversion, it seemed the only logical choice. Replicators, warp drives, and transporters could easily give every single person a comfortable lifestyle, but were so incredibly dangerous that they could never be allowed to fall into untrusted hands. So, Starfleet (and later, the Federation) established itself as the only entity allowed to possess such dangerous technology, strictly and ruthlessly enforced, but in return, provided every person on the planet with all their material needs.

This, of course, resulted in the elimination of free markets, because the only thing that could not be easily replicated was land. For a brief time, it was worried that, having nothing of value with which to negotiate the buying and selling of land, violence would break out between those that owned land and those which did not, and now could not because even human labor was now of minimal value. As a solution, Starfleet confiscated all privately owned land. Thereafter, land was apportioned to individuals on the basis of their contributions to Starfleet. This is one reason why, despite being a very hazardous occupation, it was so hard to get into the academy - becoming a member of starfleet was one of the only ways to gain significant amounts of landed property, though of course scientists and other professionals who rendered their services to Starfleet as civilians, while they could not be paid with any material goods (material goods having lost all value), were paid with land as well.

The major exception was for human colonists. In order to promote human expansion, increase the amount of available Earth land available for Starfleet apportionment, and to encourage the dislocation of dissidents, colonists were granted the right to appropriate land on other planets according to whatever method of apportionment the colonists wished to choose - subject, of course, to the needs of the Federation.

The net result of this policy was that most people remaining on earth were Starfleet supporters, and dissidents were strongly encouraged to leave Earth and colonize other parts of the quadrant. While a few colonists, desperate to escape the clutches of Starfleet, left federation space altogether, most could not afford to do so, having been stripped of the right to own weapons by the Federation and thus being almost totally defenseless and needing the protection of Starfleet. But Starfleet protection was not by any means inexpensive. In return for protection, Starfleet demanded complete obedience. Colonists were forbidden from owning energy weapons, warp vessels, or unauthorized replicators. Starfleet was even skeptical about allowing fusion reactors, but ultimately realized the necessity of it. As a result, however, Federation observation posts and starbases were never far away.

Eventually, some few came to understand all that had been lost in the great and glorious transition to an interstellar race, but they did not openly discuss it.

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amliebsch amliebsch writes  |  about 9 years ago Could this open some eyes and increase interest in alternative (Linux, Mac) offerings?

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