×

Announcing: Slashdot Deals - Explore geek apps, games, gadgets and more. (what is this?)

Thank you!

We are sorry to see you leave - Beta is different and we value the time you took to try it out. Before you decide to go, please take a look at some value-adds for Beta and learn more about it. Thank you for reading Slashdot, and for making the site better!

Comments

top

Barrett Brown, Formerly of Anonymous, Sentenced To 63 Months

anagama Re:He's Sort of a Basketcase ... (109 comments)

Get off it -- that search warrant was based on a reporter posting a link to data. The underlying issue is that he is being punished for engaging in 1st Amendment activity, the ultimate basis for his punishment doesn't matter to the Feds.

Think of it this way: say you decided to install Chrome on your computer, so you download it from the official location and install it. Then a warrant is issued so the cops can examine your laptop to figure out if you installed Chrome. You're thinking "WTF?" that's not a crime and so you give them some lip. Now you're fucked. They hated you because of some random reason, but now they get to punish you -- that it is for some random reason doesn't matter. That's what happened here -- the Feds were out to get him and they got him.

2 days ago
top

Barrett Brown, Formerly of Anonymous, Sentenced To 63 Months

anagama Re:who is he? (Al Capone the tax evader) (109 comments)

He isn't even a hacker -- he's a reporter FFS. He's going down for reporting stuff the powers that be didn't want reported, the actual crime he is being punished under is just a technicality.

2 days ago
top

Barrett Brown, Formerly of Anonymous, Sentenced To 63 Months

anagama Re:who is he? (Al Capone the tax evader) (109 comments)

This is /. not People Magazine. It is sort of reasonable to think the usual readership would be familiar with Barrett Brown. Of course there's always wikipedia. Let me tell you how to get there. Go to the Start button and press on the blue "E" icon. That will get you the internets ....

2 days ago
top

Barrett Brown, Formerly of Anonymous, Sentenced To 63 Months

anagama Re:Be afraid (109 comments)

And just so it is clear what level of morality exists among Federal prosecutors, consider this "game" which certainly gets applied in real life:

At the federal prosecutor's office in the Southern District of New York, the staff, over beer and pretzels, used to play a darkly humorous game. Junior and senior prosecutors would sit around, and someone would name a random celebrity -- say, Mother Theresa or John Lennon.

It would then be up to the junior prosecutors to figure out a plausible crime for which to indict him or her. The crimes were not usually rape, murder, or other crimes you'd see on Law & Order but rather the incredibly broad yet obscure crimes that populate the U.S. Code like a kind of jurisprudential minefield: Crimes like "false statements" (a felony, up to five years), "obstructing the mails" (five years), or "false pretenses on the high seas" (also five years). The trick and the skill lay in finding the more obscure offenses that fit the character of the celebrity and carried the toughest sentences. The, result, however, was inevitable: "prison time."

http://www.slate.com/articles/...

2 days ago
top

Barrett Brown, Formerly of Anonymous, Sentenced To 63 Months

anagama Re:Be afraid (109 comments)

Complacency. What freedom haters have for breakfast.

http://www.wsj.com/articles/SB...

Aside from statutes, beware the CFRs:

These rules can carry the force of federal criminal law. Estimates of the number of regulations range from 10,000 to 300,000. None of the legal groups who have studied the code have a firm number.

"There is no one in the United States over the age of 18 who cannot be indicted for some federal crime," said John Baker, a retired Louisiana State University law professor who has also tried counting the number of new federal crimes created in recent years. "That is not an exaggeration."

2 days ago
top

Barrett Brown, Formerly of Anonymous, Sentenced To 63 Months

anagama Re:Serves him right (109 comments)

Exactly. Everyone seems to think he was a hacker. He's a __reporter__ .

Not hacker.

Writer.

It's his job to tell people the news. He's going to jail essentially (though not technically) for linking to data. That ain't hacking.

2 days ago
top

Barrett Brown, Formerly of Anonymous, Sentenced To 63 Months

anagama Re:There is no anonymity (109 comments)

Barret Brown didn't do any hacking. He's a reporter. Reporters are fucking supposed to report the news, not keep it secret. This was just an example of the fact if the Feds want to get you, they have criminal code base so large, nobody can even count crimes let alone fit all of that knowledge into a single brain. Of course, not knowing the law is no excuse (unless you are cop), and having no intent to break the is irrelevant. What this boils down to, is the Feds can fuck you up any time they want if they don't like you. It's called tyranny.

[In 1998, the ABA tried to count crimes contained in Federal statutes but gave up estimating the number to be in excess of 3000.]

* * *

None of these studies broached the separate -- and equally complex -- question of crimes that stem from federal regulations, such as, for example, the rules written by a federal agency to enforce a given act of Congress. These rules can carry the force of federal criminal law. Estimates of the number of regulations range from 10,000 to 300,000. None of the legal groups who have studied the code have a firm number.

"There is no one in the United States over the age of 18 who cannot be indicted for some federal crime," said John Baker, a retired Louisiana State University law professor who has also tried counting the number of new federal crimes created in recent years. "That is not an exaggeration."

http://www.wsj.com/articles/SB...

See also, "Three Felonies a Day: How the Feds Target the Innocent" http://www.amazon.com/Three-Fe...

2 days ago
top

Healthcare.gov Sends Personal Data To Over a Dozen Tracking Websites

anagama Re: Wow... Just "no". (203 comments)

Are you referring to Obamacare and suggesting that no Republican ever tried to foist it on the whole country?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/R...
(yes, he was a republican)

http://www.salon.com/2013/10/2...

Nixon never really got anywhere with it though -- he had to resign the office. BUT, republicans have wanted to foist this forced subsidization of the private insurance companies crap on us for decades. Now they got it thanks to our Demoplicans.

3 days ago
top

Healthcare.gov Sends Personal Data To Over a Dozen Tracking Websites

anagama Re:Can anyone think of (203 comments)

I don't know why people keep calling it Obamacare, it's Nixoncare. http://www.salon.com/2013/10/2...

Today's democrats make Nixon look like a pot smoking hippie -- they've managed to engage in more war than he did, more massive surveillance than he did, and give away more money to private corporate interests than even GWB managed to do.

3 days ago
top

The Free Educational Software GCompris Comes To Android

anagama Re:Useless summary is useless (75 comments)

Sorry, it is not rude. It is a valid critique. You are publishing a teaching tool, thus you have a responsibility to ensure it is adequate for that purpose. That means you need to go out and find a competent editor for the English translations, a different competent editor for German, and yet another for each and every other language you are publishing in. If you don't do that, it calls into question the quality of the educational materials you are producing. Think about it, would you really want a person whose second language is X, despite being extremely smart, producing your marketing materials in that second language? If the answer is "yes" then I suggest looking up the word "hubris". A very smart person will know his or her limitations. English at the level of an educator is a limitation of whoever produced the English content for Gcompris.

about a week ago
top

The Free Educational Software GCompris Comes To Android

anagama Re:Useless summary is useless (75 comments)

I looked at the website too -- I don't think it is quite as vague as you make it out, but it is also clear to me that whoever wrote the summary and the website is either: a) not a native English speaker, or b) a very bad writer. Hopefully, there are no modules on English.

One year ago we took [^w made] the hard decision to fully rewrite GCompris in QtQuick in order to address tablet users while keeping PC compatibility. As you [can] imagine[,] it's [^w it was (*)] a daunting task and something for sure [^w^w that] could not be done alone. Thanks to the help of the many contributors who joined the project we have been able to port 86 activities of the 140 of the legacy version in a year. [clunky, especially the "of ... of" part -- maybe: Many contributors worked hard over the last year to port 86 of the 140 activities]. You can look at this page to see the status of the port. [rework: See the status report [with "status report" as the link, optionally and less desirably, append "here" and make that the link]] We can [^w] hope to complete the port in one more year ["one more year" is OK, but not really -- it feels off here, "in the coming year"]. The new version is far from perfect and we continue to polish it everyday(**) [^w every day,] but we already provide a better user experience than the legacy version. [This sentence is OK but a full rework wouldn't be a bad thing]

(*) They are still in the process of porting so "it is" could be considered correct, but everything else about this sentence is past tense. To adequately deal with the tense issue and porting stage would require a rework of that sentence.

(**) "everyday" means common. "Every day" means "each day".

Wow. I feel like a goose-stepping 3rd grade teacher. And of course, I will have made my own mistakes which will be pointed out with even more glee than I've exhibited here.

about a week ago
top

Obama: Gov't Shouldn't Be Hampered By Encrypted Communications

anagama Re:Totally a Problem (554 comments)

But my communications would not really be of interest to others. I am sure I may feel differently if I lived a life of politics or life of intrigue or sold bags of weed or raised money for Palestine or something ...

You actually have no idea whether your communications are of interest to the Government. If you are a member of the wrong religion compared to those in power, or no religion -- your communications might well be incredibly interesting. Or maybe it is your skin color, your sex, or any myriad seemingly mundane things. That could be very interesting, and dangerous to you, especially when you willing shrug as the only protections you have against the Government gulaging you, dissapearing you, or bankrupting you, is that Constitution you are so apathetic about.

about a week ago
top

Systemd's Lennart Poettering: 'We Do Listen To Users'

anagama Re:How do things need to change to live with syste (551 comments)

If they aren't maintaining Consolekit, to say it should work fine on that is sort of nuts. Note the word "should" -- in other words, if you don't mind a broken Gnome setup, or one that is likely to fail as much as work in the future, than yeah, systemd isn't a dependency. That's like saying your computer should work with intermittent power outages -- sure, it'll crash when the power goes off but it will work the rest of the time. Just make sure to set your autosave timer to 10s intervals.

about a week ago
top

Parents Investigated For Neglect For Letting Kids Walk Home Alone

anagama Re:Why is this being covered on slashdot? (778 comments)

Yeah, sort of. Programming (or socially engineering) children to be subservient and accepting of constant surveillance. Surveillance of course, is basically 99.9999% tech.

about a week ago
top

There's a Problem In the Silk Road Trial: the Jury Doesn't Get the Internet

anagama Re:Jury of your peers (302 comments)

Your thinking is what fuels the divide in punishments between the thug who mugs a person for $63, and the Wall Street bankster who mugs the nation for trillions. Your inner-chimp can understand instinctually why mugging a person is wrong, and why the law should be against it -- the complex multi-layered fancy suit wearing type of mugging however, is completely incomprehensible on that instinctual level.

about two weeks ago
top

IEEE: New H-1B Bill Will "Help Destroy" US Tech Workforce

anagama Re:Bribocracy (481 comments)

Everyone knows that the Demoblican party is the only party to really care about America! Don't be such a partisan hack!

about two weeks ago
top

IEEE: New H-1B Bill Will "Help Destroy" US Tech Workforce

anagama Re: They do it for us! (481 comments)

They'll vote for either the right-wing, pro-war, pro-Wall-Street, pro-surveillance party or the other right-wing, pro-war, pro-Wall-Street, pro-surveillance party based on the only issues separating the two: abortion and gay marriage.

about two weeks ago
top

Intuit Charges More For Previously Offered TurboTax Features, Users Livid

anagama Re:Just hire a CPA (450 comments)

An accountant is legally bound to believe a return is true. Only an idiot accountant would file something he/she knows is false. If the client insisted, the accountant would basically have to say, "find another accountant." The client, if he really wanted to file a false return, would then make sure the subsequent accountant was kept in the dark about the true facts.

about two weeks ago
top

'Silk Road Reloaded' Launches On a Network More Secret Than Tor

anagama Re: can sombody say.... (155 comments)

Nice -- that's even better.

about two weeks ago

Submissions

top

More Evidence the NSA is Harming American's Economy

anagama anagama writes  |  about a year ago

anagama (611277) writes ""Cisco has seen a huge drop-off in demand for its hardware in emerging markets, which the company blames on fears about the NSA using American hardware to spy on the rest of the world. ... Cisco saw orders in Brazil drop 25% and Russia drop 30%. ... Analysts had expected Cisco’s business in emerging markets to increase 6%, but instead it dropped 12%, sending shares of Cisco plunging 10% in after-hours trading."

This is in addition to the harm caused to remote services that may cost $35 billion over the next three years. Then of course there are the ways the NSA has made ID theft easier. ID theft cost Americans $1.52 billion in 2011, to say nothing of the time wasted in solving ID theft issues — some of that figure is certainly attributable to holes the NSA helped build.

The NSA, its policies, and the politicians who support the same are directly responsible for massive losses of money and jobs which might cause one to wonder, why do these people hate America and Americans so much?"
top

WA Post Publishes Four More Slides on Data Collection from Google et al.

anagama anagama writes  |  about a year and a half ago

anagama (611277) writes "Lots of new program names, flowcharts, and detail in four previously unreleased PRISM slides published by the WA Post today. These slides provide some additional detail about PRSIM and outline how the NSA gets information from those nine well known internet companies. Apparently, the collection is done by the FBI using its own equipment on the various companies' premises and then passed to the NSA where it is filtered and sorted."
Link to Original Source
top

NSA Surveillance Heat Map -- NSA Lied to Congress

anagama anagama writes  |  about a year and a half ago

anagama (611277) writes "NSA officials have repeatedly denied under oath to Congress that even producing an estimate of the number of Americans caught up in its surveillance is impossible. Leaked screenshots of an NSA application that does exactly that, prove that the NSA flat out lied (surprise). Glenn Greenwald continues his relentless attacks with another bombshell this time exposing Boundless Informant. Interestingly, the NSA spies more on America than China according to the heat map. Representative Wyden had sought amendments to FISA reauthorization bill that would have required the NSA to provide information like this (hence the NSA's lies), but Obama and Feinstein demanded a pure reauthorization of FISA, which they got at the end of 2012."
top

Anonymous Hacks Federal Sentencing Commission website -- Posts Video

anagama anagama writes  |  about 2 years ago

anagama writes ""This time there will be change, or there will be chaos." In response to the disproportionate prosecution of Swartz, Anonymous hacked the US. Sentencing Commission website and posted a video. One interesting thing discussed in the video, is an encrypted file that it is hoped will spread far and wide (mirror list — appears to be files related to Supreme Court Justices), the key for which would be released if reforms are not enacted. As for the statement itself, the text is available in the ZDNet article and mirror list linked above, and includes this clearly self-aware statement: "We [who] make this statement do not expect to be negotiated with; we do not desire to be negotiated with. We understand that due to the actions we take we exclude ourselves from the system within which solutions are found. There are others who serve that purpose, people far more respectable than us, people whose voices emerge from the light, and not the shadows. These voices are already making clear the reforms that have been necessary for some time, and are outright required now.""
Link to Original Source
top

Fukushima Reactor Design Questioned Since 1972

anagama anagama writes  |  more than 3 years ago

anagama writes "The NY Times is reporting that as early as 1972, the design of the containment system used in the Fukushima plant's reactors was questioned by the US Atomic Energy Commission. The article includes a link to the original 1972 memo, which pointed out that the boiling water design with the pressure suppression system below the reactor, was a method of building containment more cheaply by reducing pressure reduction within the reactor, but that if the pressure reduction system failed, breach of the containment was more likely than in simpler and stronger dry containment systems. In other words, the BWR design was a cost-cutting measure. Thankfully though, Josef Oehmen has assured us that absolutely nothing bad can happen with this design and everyone should just relax."
top

Federal Judge Rebuked for Porn Distribution

anagama anagama writes  |  more than 5 years ago

anagama writes "While Robert Zicari and Janet Romano got a year and day for obscenity, Federal Appeals Court Chief Judge Alex Kozinksi only got a non-criminal slap on the wrist for running a private website which he inadvertently made publicly accessible and included "two naked women on all fours painted as cows". While there are clear differences between Zicari/Romano's distribution intentions and the judge's intentions, it is interesting that his possession of simulated bestiality porn is treated so lightly."
top

Frys Exec Gambles Away $167m in Secret Kickbacks

anagama anagama writes  |  more than 5 years ago

anagama writes "According to the LA Times article: Debt finally topples a Las Vegas high roller: "Siddiqui, who made $225,000 a year as a top Fry's Electronics executive, once lost $8 million in a day." Apparently, high rollers are often enticed by casinos with free jet rides, prostitutes, rooms, etc. etc. It is not clear from the story to what extent Siddiqui availed himself of such services. Siddiqui was fired by Frys when they discovered he had been strongarming suppliers into paying for product placement kickbacks to his own personal shell companies: "One company, Phoebe Micro Inc., sold Fry's $80 million worth of goods between 2003 and 2008. The firm gave Fry's a $4 million discount, the IRS said, but paid Siddiqui's company $24 million.""
top

Reiser's Fate Soon To Be Known

anagama anagama writes  |  more than 6 years ago

anagama writes "It looks like Tuesday morning will mark the end of the Reiser trial. For those who RTFA, the whole trial was live blogged and if you have eight or more free hours, feel free to catch up. There is some interesting analysis by a former defense attorney, Jay Gaskill. He writes on Reiser's decision to take the stand: "As I've told new trial attorneys-in-training over the years, there is no circumstantial evidence case so weak that a testifying client can't snatch defeat from the jaws of victory in a few improvident minutes, hours or days on the witness stand." Plainly, he isn't taking a positive view of the outcome possibilities and wasn't really swayed by the Platypus Defense. It's worth noting, as Resier's lawyer (William DuBois) correctly pointed out in closing, that basing a conviction on odd behavior and circumstantial evidence doesn't always amount to justice: c.f. Cyntia Sommers conviction for murder by arsenic poisoning despite no evidence that she poisoned her husband. The conviction was based on odd behavior, getting a boob job and promiscuous activity after her husband's death. Most interesting however, it turns out there was no arsenic poisoning at all, just a lab error showing a concentration so high as to be physiologically improbable. She was released with nary an apology for her murder conviction and near 900 days in jail after new testing showed no arsenic at all."
top

Corporate Encouragement for Sharing Your WiFi

anagama anagama writes  |  more than 7 years ago

anagama writes "BT to UK customers: Share your WiFi... please! Conventional wisdom is that one should lockdown wifi, your ISP doesn't want you to share your connection, that person checking email outside the coffee shop ought to be arrested. Here is an alternative model: "BT will encourage its three million broadband users to pick up a FON router and start sharing signals. The router provides two channels: one for public access, and one for access by the owner. The public channel is bandwidth-limited so as not to disrupt the user's own connection. Other "Foneros" can access the public channel for free, while non-Foneros can pay a few dollars a day to use the access points.""
top

Forgent Patent Troll Loses Again

anagama anagama writes  |  more than 7 years ago

anagama writes "Forgent Networks, a patent troll, got the slap down by a TX jury in May when it invalidated a patent Forgent held regarding video teleconferencing over telephone lines, and today, its motion for a new trial against EchoStar was denied. In fact, the court awarded EchoStar $90k in costs. Forgent probably isn't crying that much though, it already extorted $28m from other defendants. Some of you may recall that Forgent made a business out of cheating companies for jpeg use — till their patent was largely invalidated on that front as well."
top

anagama anagama writes  |  more than 7 years ago

anagama writes "You may recall some time ago a slashdot topic about Mike DeKort, an engineer from Lockheed Martin working on the Coast Guard's Deepwater project (basically, construction of new ships). He released a whistleblower video on Youtube outlining problems and cover up/apathy related to the ships under construction. Well, in the news today, looks like the Coast Guard is taking over the project and ending its contract with Lockheed Martin and Northrup Grumman. Perhaps the (digital) pen is mightier than the sword (manufacturer)."

Journals

anagama has no journal entries.

Slashdot Login

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?