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Apple Will No Longer Unlock Most iPhones, iPads For Police

anagama Re:So everything is protected by a 4 digit passcod (504 comments)

"forget answer to security question" --- a security question is usually used in the context of retrieving or resetting a password. If Apple can retrieve the password (from the device, its servers, iTunes, whatever) or can remotely reset the password and somehow make your data available to you, then it isn't secure. Secure would mean that forgetting a password is effectively the same (at least for the next 5 or 10 years) as tossing the storage into a raging furnace.

5 days ago
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ISIS Bans Math and Social Studies For Children

anagama Re:they will defeat themselves (952 comments)

Yeah, but how will they know if they get a good deal.

Arms Dealer: Here's your arsenal (hands over 12 AKs).
ISIS: Great, here's the oil (hands over oil tanker).

about a week ago
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AT&T Proposes Net Neutrality Compromise

anagama Re:Here's another idea... (241 comments)

I used to live in a city with about 80,000 people. My choices were cruddy comcast service or slower DSL. Netflix was always buffering.

I moved into the countryside about 10 miles out of town. Comcast doesn't provide service here but there is a small regional cable company. As a result, my service 2-3x faster, and costs 60% of what I used to pay Comcast.

The real issue is that cable companies are not considered common carriers. In the UK they do the common carrier thing and there is massive competition, better service, cheaper prices: http://www.npr.org/blogs/money...

Now, about that "US is so big" bullshit. The US is like half a dozen regional Japans or Frances or Sweedens. In the middle of nowhere WY -- yeah, you aren't going to have fiber. But what about the I-5 corridor from Portland to Seattle? That's densely populated. Or WA DC to NY City -- that's major density. No reason you couldn't have 10x the speed at 1/10th the cost in any of those types of places.

about a week ago
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Court: Car Dealers Can't Stop Tesla From Selling In Massachusetts

anagama Re:Here in Massachusetts (155 comments)

As someone who is presently drunk on slivotiz -- fuck those puritans! Without condoms. In the eye. On Sunday.

Seriously, slivovitz is awesome: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/S...

Better than god. And the name is vaguely kinky.

about a week ago
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Court: Car Dealers Can't Stop Tesla From Selling In Massachusetts

anagama Re:What are dealers for, anyway? (155 comments)

You're right -- not much of a reason. Financing: credit union. Roadside assistance: my friends. My state doesn't do inspections so: irrelevant. Initial tuneups? It doesn't come properly configed from the factory?

about a week ago
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How Governments Are Getting Around the UN's Ban On Blinding Laser Weapons

anagama Re:How long 'til mirrors are considered weapons? (180 comments)

Hopefully true, but have you ever looked through welding goggles? While they will protect your eyes, you'll have no way to see. I suppose the only way to make goggles work, would be with a camera connected to LCDs -- pretty expensive to outfit a few thousand protestors.

about a week ago
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How Governments Are Getting Around the UN's Ban On Blinding Laser Weapons

anagama Re:One of those strange rules of war. (180 comments)

anonymous COWARD??!! Seriously?

We live in a country where it is almost a sin worse than murder to say that you blame all who participate in unjust wars -- to say that those who fight are, as beings with some level of intelligence, at least enough to drive and feed themselves, culpable for the choices they make. And you can't even attach your own name to your "support the troops" tripe? Talk about a coward.

about a week ago
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How Governments Are Getting Around the UN's Ban On Blinding Laser Weapons

anagama Re:One of those strange rules of war. (180 comments)

I blame the soldiers and the leaders. They are both at fault. Unless the soldiers have an IQ of about 50, they are culpable for their acts.

about a week ago
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Treasure Map: NSA, GCHQ Work On Real-Time "Google Earth" Internet Observation

anagama Re:Seems like a circular argument (266 comments)

You confuse an object with wide range of utility and a limited set of nefarious uses, a knife, with a system of technology and techniques with a limited range of utility and vast capability for misuse (mass surveillance). I suspect the annual proportion of illegitimate knife use to legitimate knife use is so low, it would look stupid to even write it out.

If we round up substantially, we get about 2000 knife murders per year in the US. http://www.economicpolicyjourn... There are roughly 300,000,000 people. Let's say each person uses a knife on average once per day (spreading butter, chopping veggies, cutting string, killing people). That's 109,500,000,000 knife uses per year. 2k/109,500,000k -- that works out to a proportion of 0.00000001826484 evil knife uses per legitimate knife use.

Note: there are more than 300m people in the US, there are actually fewer than 2000 knife murders per year, and most people probably use a knife more than once per day. There are of course other illegitimate knife uses than murder, but considering that the number up there is extremely generous to your argument, we could probably call it a wash.

about a week ago
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States Allowing Medical Marijuana Have Fewer Painkiller Deaths

anagama Re:Congressional Pharmaceutical Complex (217 comments)

Why is the parent post moderated flamebait?

The comment is statistically accurate if a bit understated. Lots of charts:
http://www.washingtonpost.com/...

There are countless articles anyone on /. should be competent to find on their own, such as this:

The punishment falls disproportionately on people of color. Blacks make up 50 percent of the state and local prisoners incarcerated for drug crimes. Black kids are 10 times more likely to be arrested for drug crimes than white ones -- even though white kids are more likely to abuse drugs.

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/...

As for the "war on black people" comment, see the book "The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness":
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/T...

Once a person is convicted of a felony, like for having an ounce of pot or whatever, huge swaths of civil and privacy rights are just taken away for life, finding employment becomes very hard, and they end up never being financially capable of escaping the ghetto. This is just as effective as "whites only" laws.

about three weeks ago
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Tech Looks To Obama To Save Them From 'Just Sort of OK' US Workers

anagama Re:That's why slashdot is against tech immigration (441 comments)

Here's an example of how one company apparently applies that "no American available" policy:

Now I am working in an American multinational here in the United States, and I find that every last person working for me is an H1B temp work visa holder. There are zero Americans on my staff. In addition to that, we recently had to fill 3 more headcount in my group. My boss instructed me that due to 'budget' that we were to go to our India sourcing department and they would arrange for contractors to be sent in from offshore (India). It would take about 1 month for their visas to be arranged and for them to be on site (in Raleigh North Carolina). Though our Applicant tracking system is overflowing with applications by Americans (including probably some of my own old ones), we didn't even look at those before bringing in the H1Bs. The corporate law firm arranges this, gives the 'no Americans can be found' stamp of approval and the temps are flown in with expedited Visas (H1B or other temp type visas that they use until the H1B is approved). I mentioned this to a couple of my coworkers, and I was discretely told to be quiet about it if I knew what was good for me and didn't want to 'expire' myself.

What to Do When My US Company Won't Hire Americans?

about a month ago
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Elementary OS "Freya" Beta Released

anagama Re:draws a lot of comparisons to Mac OS X (209 comments)

with a manky top menu bar

In olden times when the entire monitor had a resolution less than that occupied by side-bar advertisements today, the top menu bar made sense. It really did save space over putting the menu repetitively inside every app window.

But ... today it is very common to use dual monitors (at minimum) with pretty extreme resolutions. Moving the cursor from the right side of an external monitor to the left side upper corner, often feels like walking across Montana. With real estate to waste nowadays, I'd really like to see the menu go into application windows. One of the joys of X11 apps in OSX, is the fact that the menu is contained in the window.

about a month and a half ago
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Yahoo To Add PGP Encryption For Email

anagama Re:Where is the private key stored? (175 comments)

But the private key leaves your system? Even if the private key is encrypted, unless it is encrypted by a different private key on your system, you've just given away your private key (e.g., LastPass has the decryption key to your private key which means LP has your private key, albeit in a convoluted manner). I don't know anything about LastPass, but if this is true, it isn't confidence inspiring.

about a month and a half ago
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Yahoo To Add PGP Encryption For Email

anagama Re:Great (175 comments)

Is there a reason you don't let your email client and a GPG plugin handled the encryption/decryption?

about a month and a half ago
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Barry Shein Founded the First Dialup ISP (Video)

anagama Re:I'm sure he's a nice guy, but... (116 comments)

Like you I have no qualms with the "unlimited" description. Back then, when you wanted to use any network service, you dialed in, probably on your only phone line, which before voicemail service (or as an expensive extra charge), meant people got a busy signal if trying to call you. When you were done online, you'd disconnect to free up the phone line for yourself as well as the ISP's modem for other users' use.

What was cool about an "unlimited" plan, of course, was that you didn't have to worry about racking up hourly charges -- $3hr back in the early 1990s was close to the minimum wage at the time, so for a poor college student, that could be quite substantial and acted as a heavy limiter of use.

Even today, we hear "unlimited broadband" but if someone wanted to be pedantic, even at the record 50+ tbs rate, there is a limit to how much data can be sent or received in a month. I think people still get that -- kind of like how "all you can eat" doesn't mean you can eat a whole cow -- somethings just aren't possible.

about a month and a half ago
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Barry Shein Founded the First Dialup ISP (Video)

anagama Re:Uh... (116 comments)

Although certainly not the first ISP, I think Delphi was one of the first commercial online services to offer internet access (maybe late 1992, definitely by 93). Delphi was totally text based, but if I recall, it only cost $20/month for 20 hours while AOL, though snazzier, was something like $3/hr. The one good thing about AOL discs in the very early 90s, was coming bundled with a version of GeoWorks that ran on DOS.

Anyway, I finally got actual internet through a dial-up ISP in late 1994, then DSL in 1999. And now, I toy with the idea of cutting the cord completely from time to time, as I get too tired to cuss at the punks on my lawn.

about a month and a half ago
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Judge: US Search Warrants Apply To Overseas Computers

anagama Re:Finally! (502 comments)

Masterfully crafted after being purchased by lobbyists for the companies. The financial return of lobbying is massive -- more than making cool products people love.

We find firms lobbying for this provision have a return in excess of $220 for every $1 spent on lobbying, or 22,000%.

http://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/pa...

That said, I think the nature of the parties in this instance is clouding /.'s judgment. Let's say it was a secure email provider who stored all data offshore, but was a US company. Would /. in general really be so willing to side with the Feds? I doubt it, and I see a lot of potential problems that could hurt real people as a result of this decision surviving appeals.

about 2 months ago
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35% of American Adults Have Debt 'In Collections'

anagama Re:Not surprised. (570 comments)

I have a "debt" in collections right now. Comcast claims I owe $95 to them. Last winter I moved to a place where I could not only get other service, Comcast doesn't even serve (thankfully). So I told Comcast I'd be terminating my service effective Jan 15. Comcast had my credit card to auto-bill for it's "service".

Then in March I started getting collection calls from companies Comcast hired to get this from me. Nobody will prove to me that I actually owe this money. And what's odd is the amount: $95 when my monthly bill for internet-only service was about $60 or $70. I just got another call yesterday on it.

I could easily pay it and never even feel the hit. But fuck that! Comcast sucks beyond the ability of science to measure and I'm so sick of being taken by them, they're going to have to take me into small claims court and get a court order for this sum.

And yeah, I get that this will harm my sterling credit rating, but what a great means of extortion. Bill people small amounts under the threat of losing their good credit rating and even when people don't actually owe the money, they'll pay up to save their rating.

about 2 months ago
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Satellite Images Show Russians Shelling Ukraine

anagama Re:Great... (582 comments)

How lame -- your thoughtful post with an understanding of the history gets modded troll. All of the "Dem Ruskies Arr Evul" posts get modded up.

The media is doing such a great job inciting people, I'm sure we'll get another useless war in a dispute that isn't about us soon.

Oh, and for all of you all upset about the plane: USS Vincennes. We have our sins and getting up on that high pedestal looks really stupid when we do it. We should leave the condemnations of Russia to countries who haven't done the exact same thing.

about 2 months ago

Submissions

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More Evidence the NSA is Harming American's Economy

anagama anagama writes  |  about 10 months ago

anagama (611277) writes ""Cisco has seen a huge drop-off in demand for its hardware in emerging markets, which the company blames on fears about the NSA using American hardware to spy on the rest of the world. ... Cisco saw orders in Brazil drop 25% and Russia drop 30%. ... Analysts had expected Cisco’s business in emerging markets to increase 6%, but instead it dropped 12%, sending shares of Cisco plunging 10% in after-hours trading."

This is in addition to the harm caused to remote services that may cost $35 billion over the next three years. Then of course there are the ways the NSA has made ID theft easier. ID theft cost Americans $1.52 billion in 2011, to say nothing of the time wasted in solving ID theft issues — some of that figure is certainly attributable to holes the NSA helped build.

The NSA, its policies, and the politicians who support the same are directly responsible for massive losses of money and jobs which might cause one to wonder, why do these people hate America and Americans so much?"
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WA Post Publishes Four More Slides on Data Collection from Google et al.

anagama anagama writes  |  about a year ago

anagama (611277) writes "Lots of new program names, flowcharts, and detail in four previously unreleased PRISM slides published by the WA Post today. These slides provide some additional detail about PRSIM and outline how the NSA gets information from those nine well known internet companies. Apparently, the collection is done by the FBI using its own equipment on the various companies' premises and then passed to the NSA where it is filtered and sorted."
Link to Original Source
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NSA Surveillance Heat Map -- NSA Lied to Congress

anagama anagama writes  |  about a year ago

anagama (611277) writes "NSA officials have repeatedly denied under oath to Congress that even producing an estimate of the number of Americans caught up in its surveillance is impossible. Leaked screenshots of an NSA application that does exactly that, prove that the NSA flat out lied (surprise). Glenn Greenwald continues his relentless attacks with another bombshell this time exposing Boundless Informant. Interestingly, the NSA spies more on America than China according to the heat map. Representative Wyden had sought amendments to FISA reauthorization bill that would have required the NSA to provide information like this (hence the NSA's lies), but Obama and Feinstein demanded a pure reauthorization of FISA, which they got at the end of 2012."
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Anonymous Hacks Federal Sentencing Commission website -- Posts Video

anagama anagama writes  |  about a year and a half ago

anagama writes ""This time there will be change, or there will be chaos." In response to the disproportionate prosecution of Swartz, Anonymous hacked the US. Sentencing Commission website and posted a video. One interesting thing discussed in the video, is an encrypted file that it is hoped will spread far and wide (mirror list — appears to be files related to Supreme Court Justices), the key for which would be released if reforms are not enacted. As for the statement itself, the text is available in the ZDNet article and mirror list linked above, and includes this clearly self-aware statement: "We [who] make this statement do not expect to be negotiated with; we do not desire to be negotiated with. We understand that due to the actions we take we exclude ourselves from the system within which solutions are found. There are others who serve that purpose, people far more respectable than us, people whose voices emerge from the light, and not the shadows. These voices are already making clear the reforms that have been necessary for some time, and are outright required now.""
Link to Original Source
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Fukushima Reactor Design Questioned Since 1972

anagama anagama writes  |  more than 3 years ago

anagama writes "The NY Times is reporting that as early as 1972, the design of the containment system used in the Fukushima plant's reactors was questioned by the US Atomic Energy Commission. The article includes a link to the original 1972 memo, which pointed out that the boiling water design with the pressure suppression system below the reactor, was a method of building containment more cheaply by reducing pressure reduction within the reactor, but that if the pressure reduction system failed, breach of the containment was more likely than in simpler and stronger dry containment systems. In other words, the BWR design was a cost-cutting measure. Thankfully though, Josef Oehmen has assured us that absolutely nothing bad can happen with this design and everyone should just relax."
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Federal Judge Rebuked for Porn Distribution

anagama anagama writes  |  more than 5 years ago

anagama writes "While Robert Zicari and Janet Romano got a year and day for obscenity, Federal Appeals Court Chief Judge Alex Kozinksi only got a non-criminal slap on the wrist for running a private website which he inadvertently made publicly accessible and included "two naked women on all fours painted as cows". While there are clear differences between Zicari/Romano's distribution intentions and the judge's intentions, it is interesting that his possession of simulated bestiality porn is treated so lightly."
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Frys Exec Gambles Away $167m in Secret Kickbacks

anagama anagama writes  |  more than 5 years ago

anagama writes "According to the LA Times article: Debt finally topples a Las Vegas high roller: "Siddiqui, who made $225,000 a year as a top Fry's Electronics executive, once lost $8 million in a day." Apparently, high rollers are often enticed by casinos with free jet rides, prostitutes, rooms, etc. etc. It is not clear from the story to what extent Siddiqui availed himself of such services. Siddiqui was fired by Frys when they discovered he had been strongarming suppliers into paying for product placement kickbacks to his own personal shell companies: "One company, Phoebe Micro Inc., sold Fry's $80 million worth of goods between 2003 and 2008. The firm gave Fry's a $4 million discount, the IRS said, but paid Siddiqui's company $24 million.""
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Reiser's Fate Soon To Be Known

anagama anagama writes  |  more than 6 years ago

anagama writes "It looks like Tuesday morning will mark the end of the Reiser trial. For those who RTFA, the whole trial was live blogged and if you have eight or more free hours, feel free to catch up. There is some interesting analysis by a former defense attorney, Jay Gaskill. He writes on Reiser's decision to take the stand: "As I've told new trial attorneys-in-training over the years, there is no circumstantial evidence case so weak that a testifying client can't snatch defeat from the jaws of victory in a few improvident minutes, hours or days on the witness stand." Plainly, he isn't taking a positive view of the outcome possibilities and wasn't really swayed by the Platypus Defense. It's worth noting, as Resier's lawyer (William DuBois) correctly pointed out in closing, that basing a conviction on odd behavior and circumstantial evidence doesn't always amount to justice: c.f. Cyntia Sommers conviction for murder by arsenic poisoning despite no evidence that she poisoned her husband. The conviction was based on odd behavior, getting a boob job and promiscuous activity after her husband's death. Most interesting however, it turns out there was no arsenic poisoning at all, just a lab error showing a concentration so high as to be physiologically improbable. She was released with nary an apology for her murder conviction and near 900 days in jail after new testing showed no arsenic at all."
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Corporate Encouragement for Sharing Your WiFi

anagama anagama writes  |  more than 6 years ago

anagama writes "BT to UK customers: Share your WiFi... please! Conventional wisdom is that one should lockdown wifi, your ISP doesn't want you to share your connection, that person checking email outside the coffee shop ought to be arrested. Here is an alternative model: "BT will encourage its three million broadband users to pick up a FON router and start sharing signals. The router provides two channels: one for public access, and one for access by the owner. The public channel is bandwidth-limited so as not to disrupt the user's own connection. Other "Foneros" can access the public channel for free, while non-Foneros can pay a few dollars a day to use the access points.""
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Forgent Patent Troll Loses Again

anagama anagama writes  |  more than 7 years ago

anagama writes "Forgent Networks, a patent troll, got the slap down by a TX jury in May when it invalidated a patent Forgent held regarding video teleconferencing over telephone lines, and today, its motion for a new trial against EchoStar was denied. In fact, the court awarded EchoStar $90k in costs. Forgent probably isn't crying that much though, it already extorted $28m from other defendants. Some of you may recall that Forgent made a business out of cheating companies for jpeg use — till their patent was largely invalidated on that front as well."
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anagama anagama writes  |  more than 7 years ago

anagama writes "You may recall some time ago a slashdot topic about Mike DeKort, an engineer from Lockheed Martin working on the Coast Guard's Deepwater project (basically, construction of new ships). He released a whistleblower video on Youtube outlining problems and cover up/apathy related to the ships under construction. Well, in the news today, looks like the Coast Guard is taking over the project and ending its contract with Lockheed Martin and Northrup Grumman. Perhaps the (digital) pen is mightier than the sword (manufacturer)."

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