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MenuetOS, an OS written entirely in assembly language, inches towards 1.0

angry tapir Re:Which Assembler (2 comments)

If Slashdot had an edit function for submissions I would consider doing just that!

about a year ago
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Inside the Electronic Frontier Foundation

angry tapir Re:Small factual error? (98 comments)

I remember the story from Bruce Sterling's book on Operation Sundevil. It's a great read and had a huge impact on me when I was young.

about a year and a half ago
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Inside the Electronic Frontier Foundation

angry tapir Small factual error? (98 comments)

Taking on the United States Secret Service is a pretty risky venture... But that’s exactly what the EFF did, shortly after it was founded in July 1990. The Secret Service had raided a small videogames book publisher, looking for a stolen technical document that might fall into the wrong hands.

If it's referring to the raid on Steve Jackson Games, SJG wasn't a 'videogames book publisher'.

about a year and a half ago
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Interview: MUD and the birth of MMOs

angry tapir Re:Synopsis (and source article) is inaccurate. (2 comments)

The article credits both. I've reworded slightly to make sure it's clear though: "The game launched in 1978, developed by Essex students Roy Trubshaw and, later, Richard Bartle."

about a year and a half ago
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Scientists Take Most Accurate Reading Yet of Universe's Cooling

angry tapir Re:Fail, fail, fail. (91 comments)

I dropped a "-" damn it.

about 2 years ago
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Scientists Take Most Accurate Reading Yet of Universe's Cooling

angry tapir I screwed up the temperature by dropping a "-" (91 comments)

should be: The team measured the temperature at -267.92 degrees Celsius (5.08 Kelvin), which is warmer than today's universe (-270.27 degrees Celsius). I suck.

about 2 years ago
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Scientists Take Most Accurate Reading Yet of Universe's Cooling

angry tapir Re:Fail, fail, fail. (91 comments)

I fucked up and dropped a "-" :(

about 2 years ago
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A 'Small Claims Court' For the Internet

angry tapir Re:whats wrong with the real small claims court? (116 comments)

Hello, article author here. Part of the reason judge.me exists is because people doing contract work often deal with clients that live in other countries or other locations in the same country. Plus the turn around can be super quick.

more than 2 years ago
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OLPC Australia pushes boundaries of education

angry tapir Typo (1 comments)

Should be 'XOs' not 'BOs'. Damn it.

more than 2 years ago
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Why Hubble Broke and How It Was Fixed

angry tapir Re:Wonderful article. (73 comments)

Hey, It's the author of the article here - thanks so much for your kind words. I was pretty happy with how it turned out!

more than 2 years ago
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Little Ice Age: It Was Not the Sun

angry tapir Re:We didn't really know how things worked before (375 comments)

On balance it's probably natural for geeks (many of whom are naturally inquisitive) to question ideas which insist on substantial changes to our lifestyles with tenuous evidence behind them

To quote Wikipedia:

No scientific body of national or international standing has maintained a dissenting opinion; the last was the American Association of Petroleum Geologists, which in 2007 updated its 1999 statement rejecting the likelihood of human influence on recent climate with its current non-committal position.

And so all these organisations came to the conclusion that human activity is playing a key role in global warming without any "credible evidence" (to use your phrase)?

more than 2 years ago
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Little Ice Age: It Was Not the Sun

angry tapir Re:We didn't really know how things worked before (375 comments)

Yes this is a good point. But it's kind of bizarre. Another commenter made the point that evolution is also 'controversial' in the US (but obviously not so much among the Slashdot crowd). I guess I just feel down that when it comes to this issue so many people consider themselves 'experts' because they read an article or two once.

more than 2 years ago
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Little Ice Age: It Was Not the Sun

angry tapir Re:We didn't really know how things worked before (375 comments)

The trouble is, most questioning of the science related to global warming is politically motivated. It's not, "Hmm this new evidence has come to light, what are its implications?" That's not to say it might not happen from the other side on occasion. The difference is, however, that there is an overwhelming scientific consensus when it comes to global warming -- not on every specific detail, but on the fact that it is a real thing and that it's related to human activity and that it's consequences are awful. We have a ridiculous situation where in the interests of media "balance" (not to mention a number of media outlets that have denialism as an editorial policy) you have crackpots and talking heads with no relevant scientific credentials presented given equal weight to prestigious scientific organisations. So it makes it look like there's some kind of real debate about the fundamentals, when there's really not.

more than 2 years ago
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Little Ice Age: It Was Not the Sun

angry tapir Re:We didn't really know how things worked before (375 comments)

It always astonishes me that on a geeky site like Slashdot with an audience that in theory puts such a high value on science, you get so many global warming denialists.

more than 2 years ago
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Google 'Solve For X' Website Goes Live

angry tapir Re:Good luck with that... (80 comments)

Surely it will depend on how it is run and moderated. And there is not a lot of public information about that yet...

more than 2 years ago
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Garman injunction issued against iPhone & iPad

angry tapir Re:German, I meant German! (3 comments)

Ah, but then we have another problem, because it's spelled "Garmin".

more than 3 years ago
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Garman injunction issued against iPhone & iPad

angry tapir German, I meant German! (3 comments)

I shouldn't post to Slashdot before having a coffee, obviously.

more than 3 years ago

Submissions

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Silverlight exploits up, Java down, Cisco reports

angry tapir angry tapir writes  |  about a week ago

angry tapir (1463043) writes "Attempts to exploit Silverlight soared massively in late 2014 according to research from Cisco. However, the use of Silverlight in absolute terms is still low compared to the use of Java and Flash as an attack vector, according to Cisco's 2015 Annual Security Report. The report's assessment of the 2014 threat landscape also notes that researchers observed Flash-based malware that interacted with JavaScript. The Flash/JS malware was split between two files to make it easier to evade anti-malware protection. (The full report is available here [registration required].)"
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Microsoft researchers use light beams to charge smartphones

angry tapir angry tapir writes  |  about two weeks ago

angry tapir (1463043) writes "A group of Microsoft researchers has built a prototype charger for smartphones that can scan a room until it locates a mobile device compatible with the system and then charge the handset using a light beam. The researchers say they can achieve efficiency comparable to conventional wired phone chargers. The biggest barrier? Smartphones don't (yet) come with solar panels attached."
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U.S. government lurked on Silk Road for over a year

angry tapir angry tapir writes  |  about two weeks ago

angry tapir (1463043) writes "In order to build a case against the notorious Silk Road underground marketplace, a team of U.S. law enforcement agencies spent well over a year casing the site: buying drugs, exchanging Bitcoins, visiting forums and even posing as a vendor, although they did stop short of selling any illicit goods. From March 2012 until September 2013, Federal agents closely tracked the site, making over 50 drug purchases, according to Jared DerYeghiayan, an agent with the Department of Homeland Security who was part of a special investigation unit looking into the site."
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UK prime minister suggests banning apps that support encrypted communications

angry tapir angry tapir writes  |  about two weeks ago

angry tapir (1463043) writes "The U.K. may ban online messaging services that offer encryption such as WhatsApp and Apple's iMessage, under surveillance plans laid out by Prime Minister David Cameron. Services that allow people to communicate without providing access to their messages pose a serious challenge to law enforcement efforts to combat terrorism and other crimes, Cameron said Monday. He didn't name specific apps, but suggested those with encryption would not jive with new surveillance legislation he's looking to enact if he gets reelected this year."
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Hands on with MakerBot's 3D printed wood

angry tapir angry tapir writes  |  about three weeks ago

angry tapir (1463043) writes "3D printing has lost its novelty value a bit, but new printing materials that MakerBot plans to release will soon make it a lot more interesting again. MakerBot is one of the best-known makers of desktop 3D printers, and at CES this week it announced that late this year its products will be able to print objects using composite materials that combine plastic with wood, metal or stone."
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Microsoft to open source cloud framework behind Halo 4 services

angry tapir angry tapir writes  |  about a month and a half ago

angry tapir (1463043) writes "Microsoft plans to open-source the framework that helps developers of cloud services like those behind Halo 4. Project Orleans is a framework built by the eXtreme Computing Group at Microsoft Research using .NET, designed so developers who aren't distributed systems experts can build cloud services that scale to cope with high demand and still keep high performance. The Orleans framework was used to build several services on Azure, including services that are part of Halo 4. The code will be released under an MIT license on GitHub early next year."
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Australia pushes ahead with website blocking in piracy fight

angry tapir angry tapir writes  |  about a month and a half ago

angry tapir (1463043) writes "As part of its crackdown on unauthorised downloading of copyright material, the Australian government will push ahead with the introduction of a scheme that will allow rights holders to apply for court orders to force ISPs to block websites. (Previously Slashdot noted that the Australian government had raised such a scheme as a possibility)"
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POODLE flaw returns, this time hitting TLS security protocol

angry tapir angry tapir writes  |  about 1 month ago

angry tapir (1463043) writes "If you patched your sites against a serious SSL flaw discovered in October you will have to check them again. Researchers have discovered that the POODLE vulnerability also affects implementations of the newer TLS protocol. The POODLE (Padding Oracle On Downgraded Legacy Encryption) vulnerability allows attackers who manage to intercept traffic between a user's browser and an HTTPS (HTTP Secure) website to decrypt sensitive information, like the user's authentication cookies."
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MasterCard rails against Bitcoin's (semi-)anonymity

angry tapir angry tapir writes  |  about 2 months ago

angry tapir (1463043) writes "MasterCard has used a submission to an Australian Senate inquiry to argue for financial regulators to move against the pseudonymity of digital currencies such as Bitcoin. "Any regulation adopted in Australia should address the anonymity that digital currency provides to each party in a transaction," the company's told the inquiry into digital currencies. MasterCard believes that "all participants in the payments system that provide similar services to consumers should be regulated in the same way to achieve a level playing field for all.""
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BlackBerry clears hurdle for voice crypto acquisition

angry tapir angry tapir writes  |  about 2 months ago

angry tapir (1463043) writes "BlackBerry is now free to integrate German security vendor Secusmart's voice encryption technology in its smartphones and software, after the German government approved its acquisition of the company. BlackBerry CEO John Chen still wants his company to be the first choice of CIOs that want nothing but the best security as he works to turn around the company's fortunes."
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Intel planning thumb-sized PCs for next year

angry tapir angry tapir writes  |  about 2 months ago

angry tapir (1463043) writes "Intel is shrinking PCs to thumb-sized "compute sticks" that will be out next year. The stick will plug into the back of a smart TV or monitor "and bring intelligence to that," said Kirk Skaugen, senior vice president and general manager of the PC Client Group at Intel, during the Intel investor conference in Santa Clara, California."
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Android botnet evolves, could pose threat to corporate networks

angry tapir angry tapir writes  |  about 2 months ago

angry tapir (1463043) writes "An Android Trojan program that's behind one of the longest running multipurpose mobile botnets has been updated to become stealthier and more resilient. The botnet is mainly used for instant message spam and rogue ticket purchases, but it could be used to launch targeted attacks against corporate networks because the malware allows attackers to use the infected devices as proxies, according to security researchers."
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Informational Wi-Fi traffic as a covert communication channel for malware

angry tapir angry tapir writes  |  about 3 months ago

angry tapir (1463043) writes "A security researcher has developed a tool to demonstrate how the unauthenticated data packets in the 802.11 wireless LAN protocol can be used as a covert channel to control malware on an infected computer. The protocol relies on clients and access points exchanging informational data packets before they authenticate or associate with each other, and this traffic is not typically monitored by network security devices."
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'Dridex' malware revives Microsoft Word macro attacks

angry tapir angry tapir writes  |  about 3 months ago

angry tapir (1463043) writes "A recent piece of malware that aims to steal your online banking credentials revives a decade-old technique to install itself on your PC.

Called Dridex, the malware tries to steal your data when you log into an online bank account by creating HTML fields that ask you to enter additional information like your social security number. Thats not unusual in itself: Dridex is the successor to a similar piece of malware called Cridex which also targets your bank account. Whats different is how Dridex tries to infect your computer in the first place. It's delivered in the form of a macro, buried in a Microsoft Word document in a spam email message."

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Icaros, the Amiga-like desktop OS for x86, hits 2.0

angry tapir angry tapir writes  |  about 3 months ago

angry tapir (1463043) writes "The team behind Icaros Desktop, a distribution of the open source Amiga-inspired AROS operating system, have reached a new milestone, releasing version 2.0 at the end of October. I caught up with Icaros' creator to talk about what's new in 2.0, including under-the-hood changes, the addition of a BitTorrent client and a new GUI."
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Why hackers may be stealing your credit card numbers for years

angry tapir angry tapir writes  |  about 5 months ago

angry tapir (1463043) writes "The PCI Security Standards Council, which develops PCI-DSS, has recommended that merchants switch to using point-to-point encryption to prevent the largescale siphoning of credit card details from point of sale terminals (think Target, Neiman Marcus, Michaels, UPS Store and others). However, retailers often have long technology refresh cycles, so it could be five to seven years before most move to it — not to mention that the fact that PCI-DSS version 3.0 doesn't even mandate the use of point-to-point encryption."
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Australian consumer watchdog takes Valve to court

angry tapir angry tapir writes  |  about 5 months ago

angry tapir (1463043) writes "The Australian Competition and Consumer Commission, a government funded watchdog organisation, is taking Valve to court. The court action relates to Valve's Steam distribution service. According to ACCC allegations, Valve misled Australian consumers about their rights under Australian law by saying that customers were not entitled to refunds for games under any circumstances."
Link to Original Source

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