Beta
×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

Comments

top

NY Magistrate: Legal Papers Can Be Served Via Facebook

apraetor Re:But wait (182 comments)

Facebook was being used in lieu of posting a public ad in the Legal Notices of the local newspaper. No privacy required, it's a last-resort option for people intentionally making service difficult. This isn't a policy decision, the ex-husband was able to show to the court that she was using Facebook daily, so the judge decided that would be a more-definitive method that the newspaper. If she uses Facebook after the message is sent then it can be "reasonably" concluded that she should have seen it -- intentionally not opening one message so you can say you never read it doesn't get you off the hook, only delivery is required.

yesterday
top

NY Magistrate: Legal Papers Can Be Served Via Facebook

apraetor Re:I'm fine with it (182 comments)

You're right. Technically you need to notify the police department in your new town within 24 or 48 hours (depends on state) of your new address. That update would be available to the process server / sheriff. While I've never heard of anyone prosecuted or fined for failing to do so, it also provides the courts with a way around the impasse -- you failed to follow through, so you don't get to complain when you get a default judgement against you or whatever.

yesterday
top

NY Magistrate: Legal Papers Can Be Served Via Facebook

apraetor Re:I'm fine with it (182 comments)

After 3 attempts at service at the address on your license the court can instruct that a notice be placed in your local newspaper in lieu of delivering it personally. You won't be cited for contempt of court for not appearing, but you will be liable for any rulings against you; claiming you weren't notified is also not grounds to appeal a judgement unless you can show undue hardship, such as having been out of the jurisdiction at the time the notice was served. If the court can be shown that the person has been, and continues, to use a specific electronic messaging system, such as FB, Google+, then the court can elect to substitute notification via that method in lieu of newspaper ads. If you can show that someone used Facebook after notice was sent via FB, then it falls within "reasonable" expectation that it would have been seen -- intentionally ignoring it in your inbox won't profit you anything.

yesterday
top

NY Magistrate: Legal Papers Can Be Served Via Facebook

apraetor Re:What? (182 comments)

No, they had already tried notifying her by both post and in person. She failed to update her contact information with the court, knowing she was involved in an on-going case. The next step would have been to place a legal notice in the local newspaper for the jurisdiction; what are the chances she'd be reading those daily? Using Facebook is far more likely to result in her seeing the notice.. and even if she ignores it the court's obligation is fulfilled and the case can proceed without her presence.

yesterday
top

NY Magistrate: Legal Papers Can Be Served Via Facebook

apraetor Re:But your honor... (182 comments)

You're correct. And the most important part, which everyone seems to be forgetting, is that this was an on-going case -- the woman already had been made a party to it; she knew she was supposed to keep updated contact information with the court clerk. It takes a trivial amount of effort, just a phone call in most jurisdictions, so the courts at that level can allow procedural changes like this when it's clear the party is intentionally or at least willfully failing to notify the clerk. It's not very smart, but some people do it thinking it'll prevent the case from proceeding.

yesterday
top

NY Magistrate: Legal Papers Can Be Served Via Facebook

apraetor Re:But your honor... (182 comments)

Family Court judges don't set binding precedent for any court. Stare decisis requires a court to honor the decisions of a higher court within its appeals path. If the woman decides to appeal the court's use of Facebook and takes it to the Appellate Court then THAT court's decision would be binding -- but the decision would be whether FB is a legal notification method in lieu of the "Legal Notices" in the newspaper as a last-resort when the party has failed to maintain contact info with the court in an on-going case. Again, THIS NOTICE WAS FOR AN ON-GOING CASE, the woman KNEW she was a party to it, and failed to keep the court clerk apprised of how to contact her.

yesterday
top

TrueCrypt Gets a New Life, New Name

apraetor Re:Expect a FISA or PRISM notice in... (259 comments)

The problem with multi-person assurance games is that they require everyone to cooperate to maximize the payoff. Think of it like the Prisoner's Dilemma, where "civil disobedience" is the "cooperation" case, and "keeping quiet" is the "defection" case. From Wikipedia: The dilemma then is that mutual cooperation yields a better outcome than mutual defection but it is not the rational outcome because the choice to cooperate, at the individual level, is not rational from a self-interested point of view.

2 days ago
top

TrueCrypt Gets a New Life, New Name

apraetor Re:Does the TrueCrypt License (259 comments)

I think that's what the parent was implying. Until CipherShed is totally re-written it will still have portions encumbered by TrueCrypt licensing; a progressive refactoring would have the rapid time to market of a fork but without the predecessor's license (eventually).

2 days ago
top

Canadian Regulator Threatens To Impose New Netflix Regulation

apraetor Re:Fuck Canadian content welfare system (318 comments)

Netflix can't do as you suggest, because they want to continue operating in the US. Positive verification of the billing zip code is required; Netflix didn't implement that on a whim, they do it because the rights-holders require such checks. The TV and film industries like to control the availability of their properties at a national level, and since all the most desirably content comes from a small few corporations Netflix has to be careful not to offend.

2 days ago
top

Next Android To Enable Local Encryption By Default Too, Says Google

apraetor Re:Really? (126 comments)

I completely agree with your sentiment that it's really dumb to take the pictures in the first place if you aren't prepared for the risk, but that doesn't detract from the wrongness of actively stealing someone's photos. An Internet "leak" of photos isn't like a leaky pipe, they don't just appear on their own -- someone took them and shared them without the victim's permission. Negligence on the part of the victim doesn't diminish the culpability of the perpetrator; the victim may have contributory negligence in the civil courts, but stealing someone's photos, no matter how easy they made it, is still theft. Kinda like how a sexual assault victim's choice of clothing in no way mitigates the vile criminality of what was done to them.

3 days ago
top

Ask Slashdot: Remote Support For Disconnected, Computer-Illiterate Relatives

apraetor Re:Deep Freeze (334 comments)

I used to work for Apple as a Genius, and Deep Freeze was on every demo computer in the store (probably still is). It's a great way to provide instantly-clean systems, and to guarantee that users can try just about anything they want without causing any real damage.

3 days ago
top

Next Android To Enable Local Encryption By Default Too, Says Google

apraetor Re:Really? (126 comments)

You're right that most user data doesn't *need* to be encrypted, strictly speaking. As for nude selfies and whatnot -- if you don't like them, don't take them; just because you don't like them doesn't mean that people who WANT to take them deserve any less privacy, though. It might be dumb to have them on a device/account that can be so easily cracked, especially if you're a public figure, but that doesn't absolve the hacker of any wrongdoing.. they've still intentionally victimized someone.

3 days ago
top

Ask Slashdot: Remote Support For Disconnected, Computer-Illiterate Relatives

apraetor Re:You want a ChromeBook (334 comments)

If there is no ability to change ISPs so this won't work; they specifically need to use dial-up to access the email account.

4 days ago
top

Ask Slashdot: Remote Support For Disconnected, Computer-Illiterate Relatives

apraetor Deep Freeze (334 comments)

Set the computer up with all the software they'll need, disable any admin access by them, install something akin to Deep Freeze. Every time they reboot things will revert automagically. You can create a small partition for the email app's data folders to serve as a persistant store, or you could just migrate them to simple webmail. GMail can check pop3/imap accounts for you.

4 days ago
top

Sci-Fi Authors and Scientists Predict an Optimistic Future

apraetor Re:What bullshit (191 comments)

Before the first rockets were ever built they were featured in scifi adventure stories.

about a week ago
top

The Growing Illusion of Single Player Gaming

apraetor Re:Never been a fan of multiplayer. (291 comments)

When you say "multiplayer games" are you referring to all types, or just first-person shooters? From your description I would think the latter; many other games, such as RPGs and strategy games like Civilization, don't fit that description whatsoever. Many of them don't even have multiplayer combat -- it's co-op gameplay.

about a week ago
top

Court Rules the "Google" Trademark Isn't Generic

apraetor Re:Well, if you're going to push... (158 comments)

It's interesting that Aspirin was used as an example since, as you point out, it didn't become a "generic" term via the traditional routes; it's an incorrect example.

about a week ago
top

Chrome For Mac Drops 32-bit Build

apraetor Re:Requirements ? (129 comments)

You aren't stuck on Lion because of 32-bit EFI; you're stuck because Apple decided to block installs onto Macs that predate 64-bit EFI. It has the same result for you, but the decision to stop providing "fat EFI" binaries WAS a decision -- one made to guarantee minimum performance, and not because of a technical requirement.

about a week ago
top

Chrome For Mac Drops 32-bit Build

apraetor Re:Requirements ? (129 comments)

64bit builds run fine on 10.6 as long as you're using a 64-bit CPU. Snow Leopard was the last OS X version to support the Intel Core Duo chips in the first-gen MacBooks, which were strictly 32-bit; those won't be able to run 64-bit Chrome. If you set the compiler target to 10.6 or lower you get a "Universal Binary", which effectively includes two versions of the same executable. Something similar used to result if you set the target for 10.4 or lower -- you'd get a package which included executables for PowerPC processors alongside Intel binaries. You're right that the real point of this is that they're dropping 32bit support for OS X, though.

about a week ago
top

Ask Slashdot: Robotics or Electronic Kits For Wounded Veterans?

apraetor Re:On a more serious tone... (115 comments)

Oh, don't worry. I didn't find anything offensive, I was just pointing out that when you resort to name-calling it is because you've run out of intelligent thoughts to articulate.

about two weeks ago

Submissions

top

Child Porn Suspect Must Decrypt Own External Hard Drive

apraetor apraetor writes  |  about a year ago

apraetor (248989) writes "I wonder how this stacks up against recent federal court rulings related to border searches and self-incrimination.

MILWAUKEE (CN) — A man suspected of housing child pornography on his hard drives must help the U.S. government decrypt them, a federal magistrate ruled. U.S. Magistrate Judge William Callahan Jr. issued the order last week, overturning an earlier decision that said the suspect, Jeffrey Feldman, was protected by his Fifth Amendment right to avoid self-incrimination.

"

Link to Original Source
top

Apple sells apps that don't actually *do* anything

apraetor apraetor writes  |  more than 4 years ago

apraetor (248989) writes "This app, like many others in the Apple App Store, claims to do things which are patently untrue. In addition, the claims are things which the iPhone OS SDK outright bans developers from doing. For example, the app claims to repair battery capacity issues. Meanwhile, the SDK allows only polling the battery's current charge % and state (i.e. charging, full, discharging). An email I sent to Apple's App Store support last week has gone unanswered.

This app is such bs. It doesn’t actually *do* anything. The “features” it claims are all built-in to iPhone OS anyway. It relies on the naivety of users for sales; it is unfortunate that Apple, which purports to “approve” apps for customer protection, lets dishonest developers openly deceive those same customers for profit. The developer claims that the app “performs maintenance” to restore lost battery life, but the iPhone SDK documentation makes it clear that 3rd party apps can do nothing other than display the current charge of the battery, and the charge status.
“Magical battery-fixing junk”
This app claims to increase your iPhone volume.. yet another piece of Apple-approved deceptive advertising."

Journals

apraetor has no journal entries.

Slashdot Login

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?

Submission Text Formatting Tips

We support a small subset of HTML, namely these tags:

  • b
  • i
  • p
  • br
  • a
  • ol
  • ul
  • li
  • dl
  • dt
  • dd
  • em
  • strong
  • tt
  • blockquote
  • div
  • quote
  • ecode

"ecode" can be used for code snippets, for example:

<ecode>    while(1) { do_something(); } </ecode>