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Comments

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How Curved Spacetime Can Be Created In a Quantum Optics Lab

apraetor Re:mathematically equivalent ? (89 comments)

Yes! I was checking to make sure someone pointed that out, the headline is demonstrably incorrect.

5 days ago
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PETA Is Not Happy That Google Used a Camel To Get a Desert "StreetView"

apraetor Re:And? (367 comments)

"...sometimes the only kind option for some animals is to put them to sleep forever." ~Ingrid NewKirk. She's right, I know one animal I'd like to see put to sleep.

about two weeks ago
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Sonic.net implements DNSSEC, performs MITM against customers.

apraetor Left out the key element (1 comments)

Sonic.net is providing alternate DNS servers that don't implement the blacklist, so the fact they have blacklisted ones using a MITM isn't the real story; the really horrible part is that the blacklisting servers are DNSSEC, but Sonic.net makes a point of warning any would-be opt-outers that their uncensored servers do not support DNSSEC.

about two weeks ago
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China Bans "Human Fresh Searching"

apraetor Fix the demeaning title (1 comments)

It's one thing to make fun of an accent in a joke -- even then it's context-dependent -- but making a joke about Chinese accents in pure-news story is very inappropriate as it only serves to demean and can't possibly contribute to informing the reader.

about two weeks ago
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"Phony Cell Phone Tower" Stories Were PR For A Secure Cell Phone Company

apraetor Either way it brought up an important topic (1 comments)

Android devices lack any way to warn the user than the device has been forced into unencrypted operating modes -- the OS doesn't even have sufficient support to let a developer create a custom app to poll the encryption status and notify the user. That's just ridiculous.

about two weeks ago
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Ask Slashdot: An Accurate Broadband Speed Test?

apraetor Re:VPN improves my net performance and test result (294 comments)

Does your VPN use compression? Try running the VPN-routed test using testmy.net; they use random incompressible data for their testing.

about two weeks ago
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US Officials: New iPhone is a Tool for Pedophiles

apraetor No, they'd probably go with Android (2 comments)

The sad reality is that pedophiles sharing files over the internet appear to be, for obvious reasons, more meticulous in their interweb-hygiene than the average [derisory term for tech-illiterate folks goes here]. A rooted Android device can be configured fairly quickly to route all non-GSM traffic through Tor, which is great for anybody privacy-minded. Police don't find pedophiles based on what's on their phone, that would mean they're monitoring EVERY phone's internal storage; cops find pedophile websites and work backwards to find the users. Having your phone's local storage encrypted would do nothing to hamper that. What the FBI should really be pissing itself over is deniable encryption, aka the "hidden partition" feature TrueCrypt offered -- I would think that someone being able to show that the contents of the device are completely innocuous would do more harm to the State's case than any lack of access.

about two weeks ago
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Ask Slashdot: How Would You Build a Home Network To Fully Utilize Google Fiber?

apraetor Re:I have two answers for you (279 comments)

Agreed. I'd also add: You don't need every drop to be the fastest that money can buy, just fast enough for the purpose. If the goal is to be able to max out the fiber from any single location in the house then you'll end up spending a lot of time and money; if you want each device to have at least as much bandwidth as required, but don't need to go beyond that, then you can use a mix of ethernet and wifi 802.11ac (or even 802.11n depending on needs).

about two weeks ago
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AT&T To Repay $80 Million In Shady Phone Bill Charges

apraetor Re:This just happened to me (61 comments)

I've got to finish paying off my phone, I had switched to AT&T Next so once that contract is up I'm probably going pre-paid. I use Google Voice for my main number anyway, so I can bounce between carriers once I get my phone *crossed fingers* unlocked.

about two weeks ago
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Accurate broadband speed test?

apraetor testmy.net (2 comments)

Testmy.net is good for independent testing. Also, you can sign up for the SamKnows project and they'll send you a "whitebox" to plug into your network that'll run tests every hour and give you comprehensive interactive graphs.

about two weeks ago
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Texas Ebola Patient Dies

apraetor Re:Ah yes... (487 comments)

"mucous membranes", mea culpa.

about two weeks ago
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Texas Ebola Patient Dies

apraetor Re:Ah yes... (487 comments)

It's not "passing exposure" if you're near the person when they are coughing or vomiting. Both acts result in aerosolized bodily fluids, which are effective at transmitting the disease; you can't get Ebola through skin unless it's broken, but inhaling it or getting particulates into your mucus membranes will have a high likelihood of infecting you.

about two weeks ago
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Texas Ebola Patient Dies

apraetor Re:The Conservative Option (487 comments)

Communicability. Avian flu doesn't readily spread between humans, and the incubation time is much shorter than that of Ebola; Ebola can be spread to far more people before it becomes apparent that they are even sick.

about two weeks ago
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Texas Ebola Patient Dies

apraetor Re:The Conservative Option (487 comments)

Agreed. Many countries already do similar things for various types of livestock. The only difference here is that if some people die it isn't cutting into profits.

about two weeks ago
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AT&T To Repay $80 Million In Shady Phone Bill Charges

apraetor This just happened to me (61 comments)

My bill showed my data and voice plans each as $20 more than the agreed-upon (in writing) rates selected back in January of this year. I had to argue on the phone for about half an hour, but they finally agreed to refund the money. I had to stay on the line while the CS rep filed a separate refund form for not only each month this happened, but for each of the charges. Since it was 9 months of wrongful billing it took an hour for her to refund me the 18 charges -- $360. In less than a year. I've been telling everyone I know who uses AT&T to double-check their bills because of this. Something similar happened to me with an insurance company which over-billed me by $600; by the time I got the money back it was $850 including the interest.

about two weeks ago
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Internet Reputation Expert discusses how Delaware Law Can Impact Social Media Us

apraetor Article makes up false examples (1 comments)

The hypothetical situation of a doctor using social media to talk with a patient about medical matters, who then dies and leaves access in his will to a child, who then has access to the conversation logs, is a bad one. Social media platforms, such as Facebook, don't meet HIPAA requirements, so the doctor would be breaking the law by having conversations in that way; just because someone can do something illegal with a technology does not mean the technology itself is criminal -- think Bittorrent or guns, or countless other examples. Doctors have always been free to write journals, as any other member of our society might, and it's wholly possible the doctor might write about curious cases or patients or.. anything. Upon the doctor's death those journals would always have had a chance of winding up being read by some third party. This isn't something new, growing out of the new technology, it's merely a journalist who needed a slant for their story and picked a bogus one. Still, the Delaware law is a step in the right direction, IMHO.

about two weeks ago
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Pro-gaming team banned: "Too good to be girls"

apraetor Here's the other side (1 comments)

Dota2zones posted an explanation of precisely why they disqualified the team, and it makes sense. The team refused to use Skype (as required by the competition rules) to check-in before their match; the organizers agreed to the teams' complaint of hardship and let them use in-game voice instead, which unfortunately doesn't allow for a visual verification of the players. The pilot's gameplay changed radically part-way through the match, enough to raise questions as to whether the same person was playing. There was no accusation of the player playing too "boylike" or "too well for a girl". Read the explanation, this "story" is little more than an attempt to generate more "omg gaming is so sexist" drama. Not that gaming has a great record on that score, but this article is using that truth to lend credence to a falsehood. http://dota2zones.iclanwebsite...

about two weeks ago
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Ask Slashdot : Make a travel backup of a MacBook Pro SSD

apraetor Nail on the head (1 comments)

OS X is totally portable, which is why CCC works. You could also just boot from the "Recovery" boot option and use Disk Utility to copy the entire internal drive partition to an external disk; OS X will gladly boot from that, too. CCC basically is charging you for a prettier GUI. That said, there's not much you can do about apps like Office which use the GUID partition table info in their security. Adobe software also checks the system's hardware configuration and its internal license manager wigs out if you change anything. I'm only half joking when I suggest you learn to use GIMP as a backup strategy, or that you might want to obtain a less-legal pirated version for emergencies. Having worked in software support for Apple for quite a few years I feel confident in pointing out that Adobe has gone off the deep-end for the sake of security, cutting their usability off at the knees. You can't even use Deep Freeze to keep a work machine in a known-configuration if you need Adobe software, because their license engine breaks after each reboot.

about two weeks ago
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Will Windows 10 Finally Address OS Decay?

apraetor Re:No, I have not had that experience since XP (577 comments)

That's not accurate. A .jar file is run within the system's JVM (for security you shouldn't even install that junk), so it's sandboxed. Yes, you can do self-contained apps in Windows, but it requires the program's author to at least have allowed for it to be possible; you can't take any arbitrary program and just move it to a new computer and have it work. Any app that's been converted for use from a USB drive is "portable", but it's still not convenient-by-default. OS X .app bundles are packages -- the equivalent to a program's subfolder within \Program Files\ on a Windows disk. Unlike Windows, though, they keep all their dependencies outside of System-level frameworks inside the package.

about three weeks ago
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Will Windows 10 Finally Address OS Decay?

apraetor Re:No, I have not had that experience since XP (577 comments)

To be fair, though, it would be nice to have the ability to do something similar to what OS X has supported for ages: copying the app folder and user home folders onto a new machine and having essentially the entire user-space experience transplanted, as well as being able to simply write over the existing System folder with one (from a backup image or from the installer image) and have a working computer. I know a lot of the reasons that's viable is because of the limited hardware support required, but given the nature of WOW64 and the potent self-healing Windows 8.1 has (I've used PowerShell to run repairs on systems with basically the whole Windows folder thrashed and had it fix itself) I'm hopeful it is in the future.

about three weeks ago

Submissions

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Child Porn Suspect Must Decrypt Own External Hard Drive

apraetor apraetor writes  |  about a year ago

apraetor (248989) writes "I wonder how this stacks up against recent federal court rulings related to border searches and self-incrimination.

MILWAUKEE (CN) — A man suspected of housing child pornography on his hard drives must help the U.S. government decrypt them, a federal magistrate ruled. U.S. Magistrate Judge William Callahan Jr. issued the order last week, overturning an earlier decision that said the suspect, Jeffrey Feldman, was protected by his Fifth Amendment right to avoid self-incrimination.

"

Link to Original Source
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Apple sells apps that don't actually *do* anything

apraetor apraetor writes  |  more than 4 years ago

apraetor (248989) writes "This app, like many others in the Apple App Store, claims to do things which are patently untrue. In addition, the claims are things which the iPhone OS SDK outright bans developers from doing. For example, the app claims to repair battery capacity issues. Meanwhile, the SDK allows only polling the battery's current charge % and state (i.e. charging, full, discharging). An email I sent to Apple's App Store support last week has gone unanswered.

This app is such bs. It doesn’t actually *do* anything. The “features” it claims are all built-in to iPhone OS anyway. It relies on the naivety of users for sales; it is unfortunate that Apple, which purports to “approve” apps for customer protection, lets dishonest developers openly deceive those same customers for profit. The developer claims that the app “performs maintenance” to restore lost battery life, but the iPhone SDK documentation makes it clear that 3rd party apps can do nothing other than display the current charge of the battery, and the charge status.
“Magical battery-fixing junk”
This app claims to increase your iPhone volume.. yet another piece of Apple-approved deceptive advertising."

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