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New SSD controller writes at 538MB/sec

arcticstoat Correction (1 comments)

Headline should be 'reads at 538MB/sec' rather than 'writes' - apologies.

more than 3 years ago
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New Graphics Firm Promises Real-Time Ray Tracing

arcticstoat Re:Shitty summary! (136 comments)

That's kind of my fault for submitting such a long summary in the first place - the original I submitted to the Firehose makes it clear what the quote is referring to, but that submission was obviously too long for a general summary. I take your point about copying and pasting, though - I'll be less lazy next time :)

more than 5 years ago

Submissions

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Train phone thief caught on camera - help us catch him

arcticstoat arcticstoat writes  |  more than 2 years ago

arcticstoat writes "Stand up comedian and mathematician Matt Parker filmed this brazen phone thief on the train in the UK Last night. He stole a phone from a bag that a woman had accidentally left on the train, and even held it up to pose with it, despite being shouted at by Parker. We're trying to identify the guy so that British Transport Police can act accordingly, so please help to spread this around if you can. If Matt's blog is down, you can see a picture of the thief here and a full video of the incident here."
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How 9/11 Affected Games

arcticstoat arcticstoat writes  |  more than 2 years ago

arcticstoat writes "The events of 9/11 have had a curious effect on the gaming industry. From having to redraw the box art for Red Alert 2 (which not only the twin towers, but also an aeroplane) to a terrorist character being deleted from Grand Theft Auto III, 9/11 has had a direct effect on specific games, but it's also had a more general effect on the industry. Many first person shooters are now set on battlefields in the Middle East, for example, and even a decade later people questioned Crytek's decision to set Crysis 2 in New York. Part of the problem lies in the semantics of the word 'game'. It implies an experience which is there primarily to entertain; a series of rules and mechanics designed for the purposes of having fun. Hence the idea of 'making a game about 9/11' immediately suggests a product that intends to make 9/11 enjoyable, while films and novels are recognised as being able to aim for other emotions. This isn't because the games industry is incapable of making an intelligent and thought-provoking game based around 9/11, it's just that doing so would require a significant departure from a lot of mainstream gaming conventions."
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Intel unveils 50-core maths co-processor card

arcticstoat arcticstoat writes  |  more than 3 years ago

arcticstoat (993717) writes "Intel has officially taken the wraps off its next generation ‘Knights Corner’ processor; a dedicated 50-core maths co-processor chip based on the technology from Intel’s abandoned Larrabee graphics project.

Intel confirmed that the 50 x86 cores used in Knights Corner will be fabricated using the same 22nm Tri-Gate process as next year’s Ivy Bridge processors, meaning the processors will use the very latest transistor technology. The processors will also be packaged on a traditional 16x PCI-E card, so they'll potentially provide an easy upgrade for any workstation that requires a little extra processing grunt."

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Exploring the Abuse Tolerated by Female Gamers

arcticstoat arcticstoat writes  |  more than 3 years ago

arcticstoat (993717) writes "If you want any more proof that feminism still has a long way to go, you only need to look at the illiterate misogyny that's inherent in online gaming trash talk. This exploration of the issue reveals the abuse that online female gamers have to tolerate, resulting in many pretending to be male while they're gaming, while others never return to online gaming, which has the knock-on effect of reinforcing the stereotype that women just don't like games. Example comments include ‘suck a big fat cock slut’, ‘you fat f**king tomboy go kill yourself’ and ‘u no ur an ugly girl wen u play xbox’."
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AMD: We're Betting Everything on OpenCL

arcticstoat arcticstoat writes  |  more than 3 years ago

arcticstoat (993717) writes "Fusion is either going to carry AMD through to the victory parade, or drag it through the streets for a pelting in the village stocks. In fact, the whole future of AMD's CPU division rests on GPGPU computing being catapulted into the mainstream. In an interview, AMD's manager of Fusion software marketing Terry Makedon revealed that 'AMD as a company made a very, very big bet when it purchased ATI: that things like OpenCL will succeed. I mean, we're betting everything on it.' He also added: 'I'll give you the fact that we don't have any major applications at this point that are going to revolutionise the industry and make people think 'oh, I must have this,' granted, but we're working very hard on it. Like I said, it's a big bet for us, and it's a bet that we're certain about.'"
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Why Some People Can't See Stereoscopic 3D

arcticstoat arcticstoat writes  |  more than 3 years ago

arcticstoat writes "While punters are queuing up to see Pirates of the Carribean: On Stranger Tides in 3D, the film's main star, Johnny Depp, will never be able to see the film's 3D effects. Like millions of other people, Depp has a lazy eye, meaning that he can't combine the image from both eyes to create a stereoscopic 3D effect. In addition to this, some people with a strabismus (squint) can also struggle to see 3D, while millions of others report problems with nausea, headaches and dizziness as a result of viewing 3D. This feature discusses the various issues surrounding stereoscopic 3D with optometrists, and also reveals how 3D could even be used as a lazy eye correction tool in the future."
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IDC: ARM will take 13% of PC CPU market by 2015

arcticstoat arcticstoat writes  |  more than 3 years ago

arcticstoat (993717) writes "The x86-stronghold on the PC microprocessor market could start to breakdown over the next couple of years, according to market research company IDC. The firm recently predicted that ARM will control 13% of the PC microprocessor market by 2015. According to IDC's research director of computing semiconductors, Shane Rau, this prediction is also based on a traditional definition of a PC processor, which doesn't include smartphones and tablets.

"Going forward," explains Rau, "Microsoft will support Windows on ARM and companies like Nvidia will develop ARM-based processors specifically for PCs. Assuming there are strong investments from ARM and many more companies in the software, hardware, and design ecosystem, we believe that ARM will get some traction, starting with its customers' PC processor products in netbooks and then scaling upwards into traditional mobile PCs, then desktop PCs, then PC servers.""

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Amazon to sell cheaper, ad-supported Kindle

arcticstoat arcticstoat writes  |  more than 3 years ago

arcticstoat (993717) writes "Amazon has taken the wraps off a new, ad-supported version of its popular Kindle eBook reader, which is set to retail at $25 less than its non ad-supported cousin. The ads will only be displayed in a small band along the bottom of the home screen and on the screensaver page, and there are no current plans to implement in-book advertising.

The Kindle with "Special Offers & Sponsored Screensavers'’ will go on sale from 3 May and is identical, hardware-wise, to the current WiFi-only version of the Kindle."

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Good Old Games: DRM drives gamers to piracy

arcticstoat arcticstoat writes  |  more than 3 years ago

arcticstoat (993717) writes "Independent retro games retailer Good Old Games has spoken out about digital rights management, saying that it can actually drive gamers to piracy, rather than acting as a deterrent. In an interview, a spokesperson for Good Old Games said that the effectiveness of DRM as a piracy-deterrent was "None, or close to none."

"What I will say isn’t popular in the gaming industry," says Kukawski, 'but in my opinion DRM drives people to pirate games rather than prevent them from doing that. Would you rather spend $50 on a game that requires installing malware on your system, or to stay online all the time and crashes every time the connection goes down, or would you rather download a cracked version without all that hassle?""

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Getting L33t Into The Oxford English Dictionary

arcticstoat arcticstoat writes  |  more than 3 years ago

arcticstoat (993717) writes "A few net-speak acronyms such as LOL and OMG to the Oxford English Dictionary last month, but could we ever see l33t-speak (complete with numbers) or ROFLcopters in the OED? Actually, yes we could. In this interview with OED principal editor Graeme Diamond, he reveals the selection criteria for new words and discusses the potential for words such as 'l33t' to get into the dictionary."'L33t is obviously a respelling and a contraction [of elite]," says Diamond, "so it would be a separate entry, and yes it is familiar to me, so I think it's something we would consider for inclusion.""
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Saving The UK Games Industry

arcticstoat arcticstoat writes  |  more than 3 years ago

arcticstoat (993717) writes "Following the cancellation of games tax relief in the 2010 UK budget, the UK games industry is now feeling increasingly threatened by Canada, France and some US states that offer tax relief to their games businesses. What's more, it looks as though the R&D tax credits scheme offered up by UK Chancellor George Osborne in last week's budget speech is nowhere near enough to enable UK-based games studios to compete internationally. "In terms of magnitude, games tax relief would be much more generous," says Dr Richard Wilson, CEO of the UK games industry's trade association TIGA, in this in-depth interview about the need for games tax relief in the UK. "The proposals we've been campaigning for would allow games companies to basically put in a claim for a reduction in corporation tax of between 20-30 per cent on given projects. The R&D tax credits are much smaller in magnitude – we're talking somewhere around 4-5 per cent." Is this enough to enable UK game studios to compete with the likes of Canada? "Good grief, no," says Wilson, "absolutely not.""
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Doom creator: Direct3D is now better than OpenGL

arcticstoat arcticstoat writes  |  more than 3 years ago

arcticstoat (993717) writes "First person shooter godfather and OpenGL stickler John Carmack has revealed that he now prefers DirectX to OpenGL, saying that 'inertia' is the main reason why id Software has stuck by the cross-platform 3D graphics API for years. In a recent interview, the co-founder of id Software said "I actually think that Direct3D is a rather better API today." He also added that "Microsoft had the courage to continue making significant incompatible changes to improve the API, while OpenGL has been held back by compatibility concerns. Direct3D handles multi-threading better, and newer versions manage state better.""
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New SSD controller writes at 538MB/sec

arcticstoat arcticstoat writes  |  more than 3 years ago

arcticstoat (993717) writes "SSD controller chip manufacturer SandForce has just released its new SF-2281 controller, promising incredible sequential read and write speeds of 550MB/sec and 525MB/sec respectively. In this preview of an OCZ Vertex 3 beta drive, the controller appears to almost live-up to some of SandForce's claims, with read speeds peaking at 538MB/sec in ATTO Disk Benchmark, and write-speeds hitting 516MB/sec. Meanwhile, the controller's performance also improves on the speed of the previous SF-1200-series controllers when dealing with incompressible data, writing data at up to 506MB/sec in the AS SSD benchmark."
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AMD Talks GPU Gaming Physics

arcticstoat arcticstoat writes  |  more than 3 years ago

arcticstoat (993717) writes "Hardware-accelerated gaming physics has been around as a concept for many years now, but it still hasn't really taken off. "I think one of the things I'm a little unhappy about is that, despite the tremendous amount of interest that we got out of Ageia, and all the hard work at Nvidia, physics is still not mainstream," says AMD's Manju Hegde, former co-founder of PhysX creator Ageia, as well as CUDA VP at Nvidia. According to Hegde, a large part of the problem with PhysX is its business model. "I think one of the issues is the model that we used, where we fixed an API and didn't allow games developers to adjust it, because we didn't want them to break the hardware acceleration," says Hegde. "It was definitely a model that's more hardware-centric for the vendor, rather than developer-centric for the content developer, and Havok by the way has a similar issue." According to Hegde, Bullet Physics offers a much more viable alternative for games developers, which could finally make GPU-accelerated physics mainstream. "Bullet is different," says Hegde, "they want you to do stuff yourself, they want you to use the API and do everything underneath it – they give you a set of functionalities, but that functionality is effectively more or less the same to everybody, and any differentiation comes from really how you use it in your game story.""
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How do seeders profit from BitTorrent?

arcticstoat arcticstoat writes  |  more than 3 years ago

arcticstoat (993717) writes "As you may remember, a recent study claimed that just 100 users were responsible for downloading 75% of BitTorrent content, and were doing it for money, raising a lot of questions about the study. How do you profit from seeding, and how can the same 100 users be responsible for 75% of downloading and 66% of uploading. The details of the study are clarified in interview with one of the key researchers, showing that the study's actual statistic is that 66% of the original seeds indexed on the Pirate Bay come from just 100 users, and these seeds then go on to account for 75% of downloads. The interview also details how it's possible for this small number of seeders to make a profit from seeding, via embedding links to their own indexing sites in the filenames and bundled TXT files, which then get money from advertising if downloaders decide to visit the site, assured of quality downloads. Meanwhile, other ways of profiting include 'premium' registered accounts."
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Intel resumes shipping of faulty Sandy Bridge chip

arcticstoat arcticstoat writes  |  more than 3 years ago

arcticstoat (993717) writes "After causing chaos among motherboard makers by revealing a flaw in its 6-series motherboard chipsets, Intel has announced plans to recommence shipments of the faulty silicon, before the fixed chips have even started shipping. Intel claims it decided to start reshipping the chipsets after lengthy discussions with computer manufacturers. "As a result of these discussions and specific requests from computer makers,' says the company, 'Intel is resuming shipments of the Intel 6-series chipset for use only in PC system configurations that are not impacted by the design issue." The announcement follows Intel's recent exposure of a well publicised design fault that affects the 3Gbps SATA ports (typically ports 2 to 5) in Intel's P67 and H67 chipsets. As such, we assume that the new systems based on the faulty chipsets will either come with a separate SATA controller card, or that they will only use the two (unaffected) 6Gbps SATA ports provided by the chipset."
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How to enable anti-aliasing in Dead Space 2

arcticstoat arcticstoat writes  |  more than 3 years ago

arcticstoat (993717) writes "There's a reason why Dead Space 2 isn't particularly demanding of current PC hardware, and that's because it only uses edge anti-aliasing, which doesn't do a great job of smoothing out all those jagged edges. Sadly, you won't get a lot of help from your standard driver control panel either, with Nvidia drivers lacking a profile for the game, and frame rates massively dropping if you do this on AMD cards. However, with a bit of tweaking you can force Dead Space 2 into using multi-sampling anti-aliasing, on both Nvidia and AMD GPUs. Enjoy playing Dead Space 2 in smooth-o-vision."
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IBM: Graphene won't replace silicon in CPUs

arcticstoat arcticstoat writes  |  more than 3 years ago

arcticstoat (993717) writes "IBM has revealed that graphene can't fully replace silicon inside CPUs, as a graphene transistor can't actually be completely switched off. In an interview, Yu-Ming Lin from IBM Research — Nanometer Scale Science and Technology explained that that "graphene as it is will not replace the role of silicon in the digital computing regime." Last year, IBM demonstrated a graphene transistor running at 100GHz, while researchers at the UCLU produced a graphene transistor with a cut-off frequency of 300GHz, prompting predictions of silicon marching towards its demise, making way for a graphene-based future with 1THz CPUs. However, Lin says that 'there is an important distinction between the graphene transistors that we demonstrated, and the transistors used in a CPU. Unlike silicon, graphene does not have an energy gap, and therefore, graphene cannot be "switched off," resulting in a small on/off ratio.' That said, Lin also pointed out that graphene 'may complement silicon in the form of a hybrid circuit to enrich the functionality of computer chips.' He gives the example of RF circuits, which aren't dependent on a large on/off ratio."
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An Interview with PC Gaming Alliance's President

arcticstoat arcticstoat writes  |  more than 3 years ago

arcticstoat (993717) writes "It's been nearly three years since the PC Gaming Alliance announced its formation at GDC 2008, promising to 'advance the PC as a worldwide gaming platform.' Since then, Activision-Blizzard has publicly left the alliance, Sony DADC – developer of the controversial SecuROM DRM software – has signed up and some people are wondering if the PCGA is really acting in the best interests of PC gamers. However, in December 2010 the alliance appointed a new president — Intel's Matt Ployhar — who's promising to make some changes. In this in-depth interview, Ployhar reveals that he wants to tempt Activision Blizzard back to the alliance, saying that 'Activision’s Kotick and Blizzard’s Morhaime may be more aligned with our future objectives than they may realise.' He also discusses Sony DADC's role in the alliance, and the group's stance on DRM, explaining that its research can 'really help to influence Sony DADC's and other members’ awareness of key trends taking place in the PC gaming ecosystem. Given the trend of retail's diminishing presence, free-to-play, games moving towards authentication, game streaming and so on, it’s really hard to divine where DRM solutions fit into this equation in the future.""
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