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US Air Force Selects Boeing 747-8 To Replace Air Force One

arglebargle_xiv Re: track record (291 comments)

Yeah, you're not quite thinking far enough here. The human body is about 50% water (not 70%), so by removing that you can instantly double the carrying capacity of the 777. Reconfigure it as a cargo carrier, capacity about 100 tons, average human weight of 70kg (double that if it's Americans), load it with pallets of weight-reduced humans at 35kg each, you can get about 2,800 people into a 777. As I mentioned in my original post, some settling of contents may occur during this process, i.e. "you can't get them out again in the same shape/form they went in".

yesterday
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US Air Force Selects Boeing 747-8 To Replace Air Force One

arglebargle_xiv Re:track record (291 comments)

You can't shoehorn 600 into a 777 no matter how hard you try.

Yes you can, you just can't get them out again in the same shape/form they went in.

2 days ago
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At Oxford, a Battery That's Lasted 175 Years -- So Far

arglebargle_xiv Re:Bullshit (211 comments)

9V batteries have more than enough current available to stop someone's heart if put in series.

You can stop someone's heart with a standard 1.5V dry cell, you just need to apply it directly to the heart. Stick a bayonet in through the ribs and into the heart, hook a battery to it, and just like magic the heart will stop.

about a week ago
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At Oxford, a Battery That's Lasted 175 Years -- So Far

arglebargle_xiv Re:Bullshit (211 comments)

It's part of a bunch of long-running experiments like the Queensland pitch drop experiment (running since 1930) and the Beverley Clock (running since 1864, although it was stopped briefly to move it and for cleaning). I particularly like the Beverley Clock (the Pitch Drop is pretty boring), a clock that's been running for over 150 years without being wound. You can buy your own (modern) equivalents of this clock if you have plenty of money (note that they don't list a price, you're requested to contact their concierge, typical prices are five to six figures, although you can find them at below RRP sometimes).

about a week ago
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Ask Slashdot: Best Anti-Virus Software In 2015? Free Or Paid?

arglebargle_xiv Re:trendy (467 comments)

"Defender" should have been "Security Essentials", forgot the changed branding.

about a week ago
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Ask Slashdot: Best Anti-Virus Software In 2015? Free Or Paid?

arglebargle_xiv Re:Security Essentials (467 comments)

Not much harm because it doesn't do much either. It does so little that it ranks at the bottom of every single independent AV test, below even AV software that haven't received updates for years.

[Citation needed]

about a week ago
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Ask Slashdot: Best Anti-Virus Software In 2015? Free Or Paid?

arglebargle_xiv Re:trendy (467 comments)

Trend Micro is top tier these days:

... and will probably remain so until tomorrow, when it'll be Kaspersky's turn, and then they get trumped by AVG, who in turn get knocked out by Avast, and then...

Asking "what's the best AV" is a loaded question, you need to qualify it in terms of best detection (as of right this minute, but not necessarily tomorrow), least naggy, least overhead, etc. Given that all AV will be defeated by 0day (in other words the determined malware will always get through no matter whose AV you have) and that I want a machine that isn't bogged down or even bricked by my AV, I'd recommend Windows Defender. It'll catch all the generic malware (if not the latest 0day), but most importantly its major design goal is to be as low-impact and unintrusive as possible. It's not perfect at that, but it's vastly better than the Symantec/Norton crap which is often worse than the malware it's supposed to be defending against.

about a week ago
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Ask Slashdot: Best Anti-Virus Software In 2015? Free Or Paid?

arglebargle_xiv Re:In after somebody says don't run Windows. (467 comments)

All my Linux machines, of course, don't run anything.

Don't worry, I have it on good authority that next year will be the Year of Desktop Linux, and then all those apps will appear and you'll have things to run on your Linux machine.

about a week ago
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Ask Slashdot: Best Anti-Virus Software In 2015? Free Or Paid?

arglebargle_xiv Re: In after somebody says don't run Windows. (467 comments)

I agree. That's exactly what virtual machines excel at.

Any malware worth its salt will detect a VM (and the presence of debuggers and other things) and refuse to run. You need to be running on a physical machine to do malware analysis.

about a week ago
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Fake Engine Noise Is the Auto Industry's Dirty Little Secret

arglebargle_xiv Re:Just give the option to turn it off... (820 comments)

Unless you're blind, or happen to be looking the other way when the drunk in a prius bears down on you. Which is why some sort of fake engine noise will eventually be mandated (if it hasn't been already)

Exactly. Not to mention that drivers should also be required by law, if approaching an intersection, to stop 100 ft from the intersection and discharge a firearm into the air to warn horse traffic. In addition all vehicles must be led by a pedestrian carrying a red flag to warn bystanders of the vehicle's approach. The sooner we pass these laws, the sooner we'll be safe from the threat of electric locomotive vehicles. Come to think of it, we could call the necessary laws "Locomotive Acts".

about two weeks ago
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User Plea Means EISA Support Not Removed From Linux

arglebargle_xiv Re:Crusty Hardware (189 comments)

I've watched my parents throw away perfectly good printer/scanner combos that were only a few years old because there were no drivers beyond XP.

It's not so much printer/scanners as standalone scanners, it seems to be a requirement that a model of a scanner introduced during the heyday of a particular OS never gets updated drivers beyond that OS. Canon are particularly bad in this regard, if you look at your favourite online auction site you can find Canon scanners going by the trailerload because the only way to move to a new OS is to buy a new scanner (after carefully checking that its drivers work with the newer OS, which isn't guaranteed even with a brand-new scanner).The one notable exception to this is Epson, you can take a scanner you bought ten-plus years ago and download the latest Windows 8.1 drivers for it.

In general, printer/scanner combos tend to be better-supported, but for standalone scanners it seems to be a variation of the printer-cartridge planned-obsolescence scam.

about two weeks ago
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The Current State of Linux Video Editing

arglebargle_xiv Re:Attitudes (223 comments)

Second, UI/UX need to be more than an afterthought or secondary consideration. People tolerate KiCad and Audacity's god-awful UIs because they're FOSS.

This. This is why FOSS video editing sucks beyond compare. I recently had to perform a simple video editing task which consisted of extracting a short segment from the middle of a longer clip, removing the audio, and saving it so it could be played in the background as someone was speaking. I'm a sysadmin, so I don't have years of experience in using these things, I just wanted to do a quick cut&paste of a video segment and save it without audio.

After about three or four hours of trying one FOSS video editing app after another I gave up. Utterly incomprehensible user interfaces, constant crashes, wading through tedious processes that seemed to do the right thing but didn't produce the expected results, it was a nightmare. Eventually I fired up a Windows machine and did it in about five minutes with some commercial trial-ware that nagged me with ads when I installed it.

That was the result from the point of view of a computer geek (specifically one with no prior experience in video editing software who couldn't fall back on years of experience in using this stuff). The person who wanted the video clip, a retired neighbour, wouldn't have made it past the first FOSS video-editing app before giving up. My conclusion from the experience was that if you're a typical user wanting to do video editing, use commercial software on a Mac or Windows.

about two weeks ago
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Windows 10: Can Microsoft Get It Right This Time?

arglebargle_xiv Re:betteridge's law of headlines (489 comments)

They can possibly get it less wrong than Windows 8, but I wouldn't say they'll get it right. Looking at the previews of 10 they still really, really don't want to give up on the disaster that was 8, it's just 8 with some grudging accommodations made to deal with user complaints. They still want to force a cellphone UI onto a desktop PC.

about two weeks ago
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Study: 15 Per Cent of Business Cloud Users Have Been Hacked

arglebargle_xiv Re:Investigated... but were they vulnerable? (72 comments)

I also like the term "not enterprise-ready". What does this mean exactly? They don't have the word "Enterprise" in the product name? They don't cost $50,000 minimum?

New Netskope report out, now with 27% more statistics showing that 51% of things differ from a previous 37% that you weren't expecting 76% of the time!

about three weeks ago
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Is Kitkat Killing Lollipop Uptake?

arglebargle_xiv Re:Competition (437 comments)

I think most people who keep their eyes on the mobile industry know EXACTLY why adoption of 5.0 isn't happening.

Exactly. For most of the industry, an Android phone is orphanware the minute it's released. You get the OS version it shipped with and if you want a newer OS you buy a new phone. In addition, as you point out, 5.0 still has major problems which will take awhile to get fixed. Result: Everyone's still stuck on 4.2.2 or 4.4 or whatever version their phone shipped with, and until the 5.x line stabilises and until people throw away their existing 4.x phones and get 5.x ones, that isn't going to change.

about three weeks ago
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Sony Thinks You'll Pay $1200 For a Digital Walkman

arglebargle_xiv Re: Clearly (391 comments)

the audiophile market is a weird place... you can pay $100k for a pair of speakers. seriously, the laws of normal economics do not apply. I don't swim in that pool, but for those that do, this product could be highy valued.

You can easily spend over a million dollars on a full system. That's not some exotic custom-build one, that's an off-the-shelf stock system. OTOH if you're going to be that crazy then you don't buy Sony, you buy David Ling Labs Exclusive Pro Ultimate Audio System gear made from a hand-turned magnesium-alloy body with Black Label solid-state capacitors and... oh I don't know, I can't keep this up, a pile of other exotic-sounding wank, but whatever it is it won't say Sony on it.

about three weeks ago
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Ancient Planes and Other Claims Spark Controversy at Indian Science Congress

arglebargle_xiv Re:...and... (381 comments)

It's an interesting phenomenon and you see the same thing in Russian science. There are an awful lot of brilliant scientists in both India and Russia doing amazing things. But it's like there's no filter. The unadulterated garbage rises just as much to the top as the actual great scientific work.

It's a good thing this sort of quackery is limited to India and Russia. I'd be pretty embarrassed if we had some of our people claiming that the world was only a few thousand years old, that climate change doesn't exist, and that we didn't evolve over time but were all designed by a supernatural entity.

about a month ago
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Why Aren't We Using SSH For Everything?

arglebargle_xiv Re:Medium.com (203 comments)

What's wrong with Medium? It's essentially just a blogging platform, right?

So is Slashdot, if you're Bennett Haselton.

about a month ago
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Snowden Documents Show How Well NSA Codebreakers Can Pry

arglebargle_xiv Re:all this info for what? (278 comments)

Remember: 48 states have signed an agreement with Corrections Corporations of America to keep their jails at 90% bed space or else face fines hourly.

Actually that was merely a proposal by CCA, zero states signed up. There are occupancy clauses in contracts with some private prison operators, but it's on a case-by-case basis, and given the number of hideously expensive empty prisons in the US you can see why they'd want some sort of guarantee that they'll get a return on their investment.

(The problem isn't so much CCA or similar operators, it's the concept of running prisons as private for-profit operations).

about a month ago
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First Airbus A350 XWB Delivered, Will Start Service in January

arglebargle_xiv Re:Why the 1st model starts at -800? (65 comments)

It's like processor performance ratings: AMD, er, Airbus PR800 -> 270, PR900 -> 314, and PR1000 -> 350. No doubt Boeing will roll out its own bCOMP index to rate its aircraft: Take the number of passengers, multiply by the number of engines, divide by the average delivery delay, multiply by the number of consonants in "Rolls-Royce Trent 1000", and you have the bCOMP index, which oddly enough works out slightly higher than the Airbus Performance Rating in all categories. I hear that Airbus are planning to overclock their engines in order to get higher numbers than Boeing for their next release...

about a month ago

Submissions

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The upcoming Windows 8.1 apocalypse

arglebargle_xiv arglebargle_xiv writes  |  about 9 months ago

arglebargle_xiv (2212710) writes "As most people will have heard, Microsoft will end support for anyone who hasn't upgraded to Win8.1 Update 1 on May 8. What fewer people have heard is that large numbers of users can't install the 8.1 Update, with over a thousand messages in this one thread alone, and that's for tech geeks rather than home users who won't find out about this until their PC becomes orphaned on May 8. Check your Windows Update log, if you've got a "Failed" entry next to KB2919355 then your PC will also become orphaned after May 8."
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Windows 8.1 Update creates chaos for many users

arglebargle_xiv arglebargle_xiv writes  |  about 9 months ago

arglebargle_xiv (2212710) writes "Microsoft's Windows 8.1 Update has been creating chaos for many users, as demonstrated by threads running to six hundred and eight hundred messages respectively in Microsoft's support forums. Users report spending days trying to get it to work, with the Microsoft-recommend solution of using the Deployment Image Servicing and Management (DISM) tool fixing some failed updates, followed by more recent reports of it corrupting the Windows component store and requiring a complete reinstall of Windows. For users with OEM pre-installs, that means going out and buying a Windows 8.1 CD. Since no further updates are possible without the 8.1 Update, this now leaves large numbers of users of Microsoft's latest OS in the same boat as Windows XP users."
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Sophos A/V riddled with vulnerabilities

arglebargle_xiv arglebargle_xiv writes  |  more than 2 years ago

arglebargle_xiv (2212710) writes "Security researcher Tavis Ormandy has had a look at Sophos A/V and found that it'll actually make your system less secure after you install it:

The paper contains details about several vulnerabilities in the Sophos antivirus code responsible for parsing Visual Basic 6, PDF, CAB and RAR files. Some of these flaws can be attacked remotely and can result in the execution of arbitrary code on the system. Ormandy even included a proof-of-concept exploit for the PDF parsing vulnerability which he claims requires no user interaction, no authentication and can be easily transformed into a self-spreading worm.

The findings also include this gem:

Ormandy also found that a component called the 'Buffer Overflow Protection System' (BOPS) that's bundled with Sophos antivirus, disables the ASLR (address space layout randomization) exploit mitigation feature on all Windows versions that support it by default, including Vista and later.

Original paper here."
Link to Original Source

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Is Google targeting Firefox?

arglebargle_xiv arglebargle_xiv writes  |  more than 3 years ago

arglebargle_xiv (2212710) writes "As of about two weeks ago, Google searches carried out from Firefox are returning meta redirects that require manually clicking through every search result in order to reach your target. In doing this Google is specifically targeting Firefox and no other browser (switching your user agent to anything other than Firefox gets rid of the problem). Presumably switching to Chrome would also resolve the issue. Could this targeting of Firefox be because it's Google's main competitor in the open-source browser market?"
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(Possible) Diginotar hacker comes forward

arglebargle_xiv arglebargle_xiv writes  |  more than 3 years ago

arglebargle_xiv (2212710) writes "At the risk of burning people out on the topic of PKI fail, someone claiming to be the Diginotar hacker has come forward to claim responsibility: It's the ComodoGate hacker. He also claims to 0wn four more "high-profile" CAs, and still has the ability to issue new rogue certificates, presumably from other CAs that he 0wns."
Link to Original Source
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The end of the end-to-end principle

arglebargle_xiv arglebargle_xiv writes  |  more than 2 years ago

arglebargle_xiv (2212710) writes "The Internet was designed around the end-to-end principle, which says that functionality should be provided by end hosts rather than in the network itself. A new study of the effect of vast numbers of middleboxes on the Internet indicates that this is no longer the case, since far too many devices on the Internet interfere with traffic in some way. This has serious implications for network (protocol) neutrality (as well as future IPv6 deployment) since only the particular variations of TCP that they know about will pass through them."
Link to Original Source

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