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Amazon Plans To Release 12 Movies a Year In Theaters and On Prime

beakerMeep Re:"The After" = fake reviews (92 comments)

I really liked Fringe but Revolution and Falling Skies were pretty bad, agreed.

I mean to each his/her own, but I was truly shocked at how bad The After was after watching just the one pilot.

about a week ago
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Amazon Plans To Release 12 Movies a Year In Theaters and On Prime

beakerMeep "The After" = fake reviews (92 comments)

"The After" was absolutely terrible. I am pretty sure it was a ballot box stuffing / fake user rating bonanza. IT had 15,000 reviews which is 5-10x as many as most classic shows (like X-files, Firefly, Star Trek), and as much as Transparent which won 2 major awards (not my cup of tea but clearly more popular than The After).

It had 2x the reviews as many popular movies such a Hunger Games 2, World War Z, the new Star Treks, etc etc. The whole thing was like the start of a bad joke. "A clown, lawyer, hooker, cop, escaped con, etc etc walk into a garage and the world ends. What do?"

Amazon was right to can it. I hop they toss it off the site entirely. /my 2c

about a week ago
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Ask Slashdot: Sounds We Don't Hear Any More?

beakerMeep Re:Modem connection tones (790 comments)

That is the most wonderful and disturbing thing I have heard since .....[BUFFERING]

about two weeks ago
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Michael Mann: Swiftboating Comes To Science

beakerMeep Re:Stop trying to win this politically (786 comments)

He said at the end no one is paying him. If this article is something you think should be ignored because he is somehow playing politics as deflected Karmashock, then you're just obtuse.

He is no more a political strategist than you or I. Maybe you should re-read the article.

about two weeks ago
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Michael Mann: Swiftboating Comes To Science

beakerMeep Re:Stop trying to win this politically (786 comments)

Political strategist? His "strategy" is to communicate with the public about science. It's not like he is planning out press releases and talking points and media buys. This is not some Karl Rove or David Plouff.

He's advocating scientists not remain silent. He is standing up for the right for scientists to be part of the conversation. And about how to spot disingenuous arguments. So yeah, this is the wrong time for the "oh stop the politics" argument. Trotting out and attacking Al Gore (as the GP poster did) is exactly the kind of bullshit arguments Mann is warning about.

I think that it is indeed our responsibility collectively, as scientists, to convey the societal implications of our work (Mann, 2014a). Just because we are scientists does not mean that we should check our citizenship at the door of a public meeting. There is nothing inappropriate about drawing on our scientific know-ledge to speak out about the very real implications of our research. As Stephen Schneider used to say, being a scientist-advocate is not an oxymoron. If scientists choose not to engage on matters of policy-relevant science, then we leave a void that will be filled by industry-funded disinformation.

about two weeks ago
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Michael Mann: Swiftboating Comes To Science

beakerMeep Re:Stop trying to win this politically (786 comments)

Funny, this article is by a climate scientist.

Karmashock is just trying to misdirect by pointing fingers at unrelated political arguments to create FUD and guilt by association. All of which are decidedly political tactics.

"Advice"...? Not so much.

about two weeks ago
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Google Sees Biggest Search Traffic Drop Since 2009 As Yahoo Gains Ground

beakerMeep Re:Yes, it is the cause (155 comments)

Is it? How many people switched back after being switched without being asked?

It might be but TFA is useless as far as details go.

about three weeks ago
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FCC Favors Net Neutrality

beakerMeep Re:Seriously? GOOD NEWS? (255 comments)

Very true. I was referring more towards Wheeler's FCC though. He's been full of talk but light on substantive action. They seem to dance around imposing any real burden on telcos or ISPs.

Wheeler was only on the job for a month or two before the Verizon court win (I think).

about three weeks ago
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FCC Favors Net Neutrality

beakerMeep Re:related article my ass (255 comments)

Pretty sure it was soulskill that added that gem of stupid

about three weeks ago
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FCC Favors Net Neutrality

beakerMeep Re:Seriously? GOOD NEWS? (255 comments)

It's all PR talk until they actually do anything about it.

about three weeks ago
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Google and Apple Weaseling Out of "Do Not Track"

beakerMeep Re:Do Not Track never meant anything (145 comments)

I agree MS gave them a good excuse to get out of a system they didn't want to deal with, but it's a reasonable argument that defaulting DNT to on makes it not a user expression of intent. Even one of the Apache devs thought so and submitted a patch to ignore specifically IE10's DNT flag. Although the powers that be eventually rolled that patch back.

In a way, MS poisoned the well, no? Either by (as you state) providing a convenient excuse (possibly intentionally or unintentionally), or by using the flag as a jab at Google. It almost doesn't matter why they did it. The net result was that DNT was ignored by FB, Goog, Apple, Amazon, Adobe and Yahoo -- only Twitter (who use Google Analytics, oddly) went against the grain. MS was warned by a number of marketers this would be the result too, and MS responded with a rather hostile press release.

And yes it's PR... there's PR going around on all sides here -- that's part of what I am saying. Google et. al. are not innocent bystanders here, dont get me wrong, but I am trying to see the whole picture.

I think we'll have to agree to disagree on this one but I am glad that we both seem to want the same end-game: protecting user privacy. As long as there are smart, good people working on this goal, I think it's probably OK that it proceed on several fronts.

Personally I am more concerned about other data aggregators than Google (et. al.) though. If you look at companies like HireRight, Experian (et. al.) -- these companies are truly invading peoples lives. Most of the advertising networks are just selling targeting buckets (e.g. target your ad to males over 45 who make over $150k). But the credit bureaus control people's ability to get a house, to buy a car, to get a job. And there is no way to opt out of that.

Anyways, cheers for the debate.

about a month ago
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Google and Apple Weaseling Out of "Do Not Track"

beakerMeep Re:Do Not Track never meant anything (145 comments)

Of course I read your post, please don't be condescending and spare me the piecemeal quoting. Not everything in my post was supposed to be a refutation of yours.

Suggesting we protect privacy through politics just sounds ridiculous to me. It was never even clear what was defined as tracking by DNT. DNT wasn't less intrusive, it was empty and symbolic. So, here's my question: why did we need an empty, symbolic regulation to show that ad companies are tracking people?

Back to your original point though, the ad industry seemed to be ready to support DNT until MS made the default setting on, which clearly wasn't a user's "wishes". This wasn't a display of the advertising industry's unwillingness to regulate themselves, it was their unwillingness to let MS dictate terms to them.

Additionally, the NAI has long had an opt out system: http://www.networkadvertising.... (long before DNT). Saying they failed to self-regulate strikes me a misinformed at best.

Also, you might want to consider your own knowledge level on a subject before accusing others of not understanding, it might improve "your persuasion skills".

about a month ago
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Google and Apple Weaseling Out of "Do Not Track"

beakerMeep Re:Do Not Track never meant anything (145 comments)

I get what you are saying but I dont think it actually makes it any harder to argue ToS in court, especially if it is enabled by default in IE.

If you can agree to contractual terms by clicking through some agreement, you can agree to "waive" your DNT setting. Think about it this way, would it stand up in court if we put a "I don't agree to any DRM in the video I watch online" header in HTTP?

Either way, I am not sure what court is going to protect you from malicious actors that would not follow DNT. We should be working on stopping the ability to track, not about making statements of intent for possible future litigation in a court of law. Browsers were supposed to be the "thin-client-ish" gatekeepers that sandbox the web for users, not our legal representation.

about 1 month ago
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Google and Apple Weaseling Out of "Do Not Track"

beakerMeep Re:Do Not Track never meant anything (145 comments)

Cross site tracking wasn't some secret. DNT just put some hand-wavey PR fluff at the forefront of the privacy debate, and it's not protecting anyone. This plays wonderfully for companies that make money from products and want to stick it to companies that make money off of ads.

I don't know about you, but I would like a real solution. A client HTTP header that asks to the server to please behave is a waste of everyone's time. From a technical perspective this should have been laughed out of the room before it ever got started. But DNT was always political. It was just so that some people/groups can point fingers and others can feel vindicated from a false sense of accomplishment. It is exactly what you are doing in your post.

But most of the people who have heard of DNT also knew cross site tracking was happening long before DNT came to be.

about 1 month ago
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Google and Apple Weaseling Out of "Do Not Track"

beakerMeep Re:TOR (145 comments)

After the hype it seems that story was overblown -- looked like less than 1% were compromised. See: https://twitter.com/torproject...

Still.... I, for one welcome our new Weaponized Internet Ov...LOADING....

about 1 month ago

Submissions

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beakerMeep beakerMeep writes  |  more than 7 years ago

beakerMeep (716990) writes "David Marcus, a user on Kuro5hin, recently put together an excellent piece on the perils and faults behind the workings of Digg.com. From the article: 'As I write, the top story on Digg is "Transparency in Social News", a newspaper-as-blog item that the Digg community have used as a little self-congratulatory pat on the back. I understand why Digg's users feel like they deserve to toast themselves now and then — after all, they've made the place one of the Web's Top 100 sites, and they've made Digg, Inc. upwards of $200 million.' Incidentally, as I submit this story to Slashdot, Digg has appears to have removed the story from the list of upcoming stories."

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