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By the Numbers: The Highest-Paying States For Tech Professionals

beelsebob Re:Flash? (133 comments)

The thing is, suppose your cost of living is indeed half that of SV. Lets assume for you, the cost of living is 40k a year - you are able to save or enjoy 30k a year. Lets assume it's 80k a year in SV. That guy earning 140k a year is still saving 60k a year, and will retire to the mid west much better off.

Also, the other thing that this isn't taking into account is the rate at which you get given shares in companies. Someone working for one of the big SV tech companies, and earning $140k a year is likely to be being given more than $100k in stock a year if they're even half competent. Sure, it vests over time, but after a few years, that's literally just $100k coming in from vesting every single year.

2 days ago
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By the Numbers: The Highest-Paying States For Tech Professionals

beelsebob Re:Salary versus cost of living in each city (133 comments)

First off, you are absolutely right. Making 125K a year in Silicon Valley isn't worth a hill of beans if you have to pay 5K a month for a nice apartment. Or maybe even not so nice.

Just for reference - SV is expensive, but not that expensive. I pay less than $3k a month for a nice 3 bed house there. It's only the idiots who want to live in the city that end up paying $4k a month for a 1 bed apartment.

2 days ago
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By the Numbers: The Highest-Paying States For Tech Professionals

beelsebob Re:Salary versus cost of living in each city (133 comments)

Uhhh yeh, and you don't think a couple earning $250,000 can afford a tax lawyer too? Yeh right. Get off your high horse.

2 days ago
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By the Numbers: The Highest-Paying States For Tech Professionals

beelsebob Re:Salary versus cost of living in each city (133 comments)

Yes, but also no. In general, even in areas with a high cost of living, you end up better off. No matter where you live, you typically end up spending somewhere around 30-40% of your income on housing, 20-30% on living, and 30-40% as disposable income of one form or another (savings, having fun, etc). 30-40% of a silicon valley wage is still substantially more than 30-40% of a mid-west wage, that means you gain substantially more savings by working there, and when you retire, and move to somewhere like the mid west, you are substantially better off.

2 days ago
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Fake Engine Noise Is the Auto Industry's Dirty Little Secret

beelsebob Re:Then there's the old performance trick... (792 comments)

Actually, in terms of rev range, F1 engines and street engines aren't too dissimilar. F1 engines can rev to 15000rpm, but they're designed not to, because the fuel flow is not allowed to increase above 10500rpm. Because of that, they're designed to run at between 8000 and 12000rpm most of the time. Modern road car small turbos tend to rev up to 8000rpm. They're a little separate, but not as much as the 15000rpm rev limit on an F1 engine makes it seem.

The thing that differs on the F1 engine is actually the compression ratio they're expected to endure, and the size and speed of the turbo charger. The turbos carry so much energy that they have to have ballistic shields installed around them in case one fails. That of course is why the engine then ends up so quiet - all the exhaust energy goes into spinning a massive turbo up to 150,000rpm.

3 days ago
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Fake Engine Noise Is the Auto Industry's Dirty Little Secret

beelsebob Re:Then there's the old performance trick... (792 comments)

There's only so much energy in the exhaust though, and that level has been steadily diminishing, especially with the advent of modern small turbo engines.

Just look at modern F1 cars. They're getting nearly 900 horse power out of a 1.6l turbo (plus hybrid system), and the engines are so quiet you hear tire scrub over them, even with racing slick tires.

3 days ago
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Fake Engine Noise Is the Auto Industry's Dirty Little Secret

beelsebob Re:Just give the option to turn it off... (792 comments)

Not really, no. Automatics generally shift less optimally than a human, and in doing so, waste fuel. The only advantage they have is that they will put up with changing gear more often, and as such, are able to have 8-10 speed gearboxes fitted rather than the traditional 4-6 speed in a manual. That allows them to keep things closer to the optimal rev range. The result - an automatic will generally get almost exactly the same milage as a manual.

3 days ago
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Insurance Company Dongles Don't Offer Much Assurance Against Hacking

beelsebob Re:Hello insurance fraud (199 comments)

"And the excess damage?"

What excess damage? You (the insurance company) have the data, and here is my car. There's no "excess damage", just "damage".

Do you think (the insurance company) that my accident should render less damage? That's not my problem, I'm neither a materials engineer, nor I designed my car.

Do you think I commited fraud? Why do you think so? Maybe because you know your devices are easily hackable? Maybe I should sue you (the insurance company) for puting me at risk for your lack of due diligence.

Yes the insurer absolutely will think you committed fraud. Then their very first step will be to ask the police for an accident report. The police will then report that the skid marks indicate that the car must have been travelling at at least 50mph, not the 20mph indicated by the dongle.

Believe me, when that is put in front of a judge, your "putting you at risk" charge is going to be thrown out, and their fraud charge is going to hit you square between the eyes.

about a week ago
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Analysis Suggests Solar System Contains Massive Trans-Neptunian Objects

beelsebob Re:Probe (170 comments)

Where by "reasonable timeframe" you mean "once every 2 and a half millennia", plus, getting into a retrograde orbit around the sun increases the fuel bill, and the issue with point 1) even more.

about a week ago
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Analysis Suggests Solar System Contains Massive Trans-Neptunian Objects

beelsebob Re:Probe (170 comments)

1) It's very difficult to get there - Voyager 1 and 2 are the only probes ever to get that far from the sun and still be functional, and they took decades to get there
2) If you hang around in the orbit of the planet, then you'll have the same orbital period as it. Effectively, you'd stay stationary relative to the planet, and as a result never spot it unless you got lucky and landed exactly where the planet was.

about a week ago
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Steam For Linux Bug Wipes Out All of a User's Files

beelsebob Re:And that people... (329 comments)

They were not backups. If they're plugged in, they're merely redundancy.

about two weeks ago
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Steam For Linux Bug Wipes Out All of a User's Files

beelsebob Re:And that people... (329 comments)

And also, why redundancy is not backup. If your backup is plugged in and/or mounted, it's not a backup any more.

about two weeks ago
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Chevrolet Unveils 200-Mile Bolt EV At Detroit Auto Show

beelsebob Re:Only 30 Grand? (426 comments)

That doesn't mean total system efficiency is better.

Which is why the rest of my comment covers figuring out the total system efficiency.

Comparing a cold engine (worst case scenerio) with a an operating power plant (best case).

sorry, this was a typo, the word "cold" should be substituted for "golf", and I should turn off autocorrect. 34% is roughly the best efficiency you'll get from the golf's engine, once warmed up, at its optimal rev range. In reality, the average case will be substantially lower than this. The current best engines out there in terms of efficiency only manage about 38% thermal efficiency, and even then, again, only at their optimal rev range.

Not really. You're over estimating the mechanical transmission losses, while under-estimating the electrical transmission losses. (Multiple conversions at the plant, during transmission, and during use)

Actually, no, I'm not over estimating mechanical transmission losses. There are several studies into this. Mechanically propelled cars really are only roughly 15% efficient at the wheel. That said, you're right, I did miss out transmission efficiency. The electric grid is about 94% efficient in the US. Meanwhile, carrying a gallon of diesel to petrol stations in a tanker, burns on average 0.2 gallons of diesel, so roughly 84% efficient. That makes the total system efficiency of diesel 12.5%, and for electricity 45%. That actually makes the story worse for diesel, not better.

If you ignore fuel production costs, Modern ICE engines compare quite well.

1) Now who's got "obvious bias"? "If you ignore half the equation, then this looks better"
2) It doesn't even look better - as outlined above, it actually looks worse for fuel if you include transmission efficiency.

about two weeks ago
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Chevrolet Unveils 200-Mile Bolt EV At Detroit Auto Show

beelsebob Re:Cherry picking (426 comments)

Nope, not cherry picking, just sucking at slapping autocorrect. Replace "cold" with "golf" and you'll get the right sentence.

about two weeks ago
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Chevrolet Unveils 200-Mile Bolt EV At Detroit Auto Show

beelsebob Re:Only 30 Grand? (426 comments)

Even if the answer is a giant coal power plant, that coal power plant is much more thermally efficient than your Golf TDi. The cold TDi's engine is around 34% efficient (and that's ignoring the fact that a petrol car has a much more significant gear box and transmission than an electric, and hence loses more there, it's likely to only about 15% efficient at the wheels). Meanwhile thermal efficiency for power plants is around 60% and electric cars have thermal efficiencies around 80%, so in total about 48% thermally efficient at the wheels. That is, for the same power, an electric car will burn 3 times less fossil fuels, even if you assume that it is 100% powered by fossil fuel power plants.

about two weeks ago
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Michael Mann: Swiftboating Comes To Science

beelsebob Re:Stop trying to win this politically (786 comments)

If Global Warming is a science issue then stop trying to make political arguments.

Global warming is a science issue and is argued by scientists in papers. The problem is that convincing everyone to do something about global warming is a political issue, and politicians aren't above discrediting anyone who opposes them to get their way.

about two weeks ago
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LAPD Orders Body Cams That Will Start Recording When Police Use Tasers

beelsebob Re:why start after the fact? (219 comments)

Also, the police don't go out on 24/7 shifts. They go out on 8 hour shifts.

about two weeks ago
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Cryptocurrency Based Basic Income Program Started In Finland

beelsebob Re:Sounds suspiciously like welfare. (109 comments)

To be fair, Obama proposed exactly that (he proposed a government option insurance so that the cost of basic insurance was effectively capped). Just the Republicans shot it down.

about two weeks ago
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Cryptocurrency Based Basic Income Program Started In Finland

beelsebob Re:It's a con... (109 comments)

Welfare looks nothing like this.

This is literally "I'll give you something for nothing"

Welfare involves people actually paying taxes. That is, it is not something for nothing, it is simply amortising the average person's income a bit to allow them to get through difficult times.

about two weeks ago

Submissions

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Apple Switches (Mostly) to OpenStreetMap

beelsebob beelsebob writes  |  more than 2 years ago

beelsebob (529313) writes "In the recent release of iPhoto for iOS it appears that Apple have started using OpenStreetMap's data. Unfortunately, there are still some problems. Apple are currently not applying the necessary attribution to OSM; they are using an old (from April 2010) dump of the data; and they are not using the data in the USA. Fingers crossed apple works through these issues quickly!

Apple are now one of a growing list (including geocaching, and foursquare) to Switch2OSM."

Link to Original Source
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OpenCL 1.0 Ratified and Released to the Public

beelsebob beelsebob writes  |  more than 6 years ago

beelsebob (529313) writes "The Khronos group announced the ratification and public release of the OpenCL 1.0 specification described as the first open, royalty-free standard for cross-platform, parallel programming of modern processors found in personal computers, servers and handheld/embedded devices."
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Apple drops iPhone Developer NDA

beelsebob beelsebob writes  |  more than 6 years ago

beelsebob (529313) writes "Today Apple dropped the iPhone developer NDA.

We put the NDA in place because the iPhone OS includes many Apple inventions and innovations that we would like to protect, so that others don't steal our work. It has happened before. While we have filed for hundreds of patents on iPhone technology, the NDA added yet another level of protection. We put it in place as one more way to help protect the iPhone from being ripped off by others.

However, the NDA has created too much of a burden on developers, authors and others interested in helping further the iPhone's success, so we are dropping it for released software. Developers will receive a new agreement without an NDA covering released software within a week or so. Please note that unreleased software and features will remain under NDA until they are released."
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Squirrelfish takes a bite out of performance

beelsebob beelsebob writes  |  more than 6 years ago

beelsebob (529313) writes "We all recently heard that Google Chrome had introduced a new Javascript engine called V8, that made all the other engines out there look like toys. Today the WebKit team announced that their Squirrelfish engine has been optimized a lot more, to produce Squirrelfish Extreme. The improvements are enough that WebKit now runs Javascript faster than Chrome. The competition between browser makers seems to be paying off for us consumers with some major improvements in performance now."
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beelsebob beelsebob writes  |  about 8 years ago

beelsebob (529313) writes "Very well known is the iBook G3 logic board failure issue, however, less well known is that iBook G4s have been failing with the same symptoms almost as regularly. The G4 variant of the laptop is not covered by Apple's logic board repair program, thus if it dies, it's dead. Or so we thought, until recently. An enterprising guy has posted a fix for the problem that works simply by sticking a tiny bit of plastic under a chip."

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