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Independent Researchers Test Rossi's Alleged Cold Fusion Device For 32 Days

bheading Re:He tried patenting it... (973 comments)

Rossi's time in prison was due to uncleared allegations of tax fraud and toxic waste mishandling [wikipedia.org], which even if true would have little to do with this story

He served time for them so they probably are true; and yes, this has everything to do with the story. This man lied to the government about his tax liability, and apparently lied to everyone with a false claim to convert toxic waste into oil.

about a week ago
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Independent Researchers Test Rossi's Alleged Cold Fusion Device For 32 Days

bheading Re:He tried patenting it... (973 comments)

Occam's razor sometimes shows that the seemingly improbable is actually the most likely explanation.

LOL. No it doesn't.

Occam's razor says (as a very basic summary) that in the absence of evidence or specific information, the proposal that requires the least assumptions is probably correct. Or, more conversationally, that in the absence of any better ideas, the simplest guess is probably the truth. The simplest guess here is that the guy is a fraud. The non-simple guess is that the guy is not a fraud and that our understanding of matter and energy to date (which is based on a huge body of actual scientific measurement and observation) is all wrong.

I think you are confusing this with Spock/Sherlock Holmes say that when all the impossible proposals are eliminated, the one remaining, however impossible, must be the truth. That's a good maxim to live by; the problem is that we haven't eliminated the possibility that the guy is a fraud.

about a week ago
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After the Sun (Microsystems) Sets, the Real Stories Come Out

bheading Re:Cool Technology (166 comments)

I can't think of a single good technology that originated at Sun

ZFS, dtrace ?

about 5 months ago
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Tux3 File System Could Finally Make It Into the Mainline Linux Kernel

bheading Re:Ambitious but not much has happened in 6 yrs (121 comments)

On the contrary. What we have in filesystems at the moment is fragmentation.

We need people pitching in with stabilizing and fixing one major FS in Linux. It looks to me as if that should be btrfs.

about 5 months ago
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Your Old CD Collection Is Dying

bheading Re:Yet Vinyl still endures (329 comments)

Back in the day, the cutting masters from which LPs were pressed were inferior (the sound had to be modified to make it fit on the LP - longer tracks had to have their levels cut so that the track pitch could be reduced to enable them to be pressed). There is absolutely no way any objective person could believe that the compromised masters, which were modified in order to fit on vinyl, were in any way superior to the clean digital copies - except for pop music which was exposed to the loudness problem.

These days I would have assumed that the same problem would exist so I don't get this about modern LPs at all. If I want the sound of an LP I'll listen to a CD while scrunching a packet of Rice Krispies next to my ear.

about 5 months ago
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Your Old CD Collection Is Dying

bheading Re:Really??? (329 comments)

Use dbpoweramp/PerfectRip.

When ripping it checksums the CDs and confirms that they match in a database where others have submitted their checksums of the same CD.

I have CDs which date back to the 80s which, according to this checksum, are bit-for-bit accurate.

Try doing that with an LP.

about 5 months ago
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OpenSSL Cleanup: Hundreds of Commits In a Week

bheading Re:They don't pay attention to Coverity (379 comments)

I have used another major static analysis tool at work, one of Coverity's competitors. And more than once have had the "if you had paid attention to the static analysis reports this problem could have been solved much more quickly and cheaply" discussion. In one case several weeks were spent chasing a particularly subtle and nasty memory tramper - which was found to be showing up in the analysis results.

False positives are certainly a concern. There is a tradeoff here in terms of dealing with the time spent (re)structuring the program so that they do not occur - a matter for the project lead. The same is true of compiler warnings. Best invest the time to clean them up and configure your build so that it breaks if they occur. You'll kick yourself later if you hit a bug that was revealed by a warning which was ignored.

about 6 months ago
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OpenSSL Cleanup: Hundreds of Commits In a Week

bheading Re:Are they still running it through Coverity ? (379 comments)

I know that static analysis cannot catch all problems (duh) but I was curious, as this seems like a fairly classic example of accessing tainted data which in many circumstances the analyzers can spot. The blog post referenced above explains why this is.

about 6 months ago
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OpenSSL Cleanup: Hundreds of Commits In a Week

bheading Are they still running it through Coverity ? (379 comments)

OpenSSL is on the list of projects scanned by Coverity.

I wonder why exactly Coverity did not catch the heartbleed bug. Most likely, the scan wasn't set up to deal with OpenSSL's use of it's own internal heap management routines. That's something that I would have thought should be fixed right away.

about 6 months ago
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Sulfur Polymers Could Enable Long-Lasting, High-Capacity Batteries

bheading Lithium Ion lifetime - really ? (131 comments)

Article says "In comparison, a lithium-ion battery typically starts out with a storage capacity of 200 mAh/g but maintains it for the life of the battery, Pyun says."

Hmm. I have lithium ion batteries that can't hold a charge at all.

And it's only partially to do with how they're used. Lithium ion batteries lose capacity while in storage. Which is why you should never buy a used, or a new-old-stock one.

about 8 months ago
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FSF's Richard Stallman Calls LLVM a 'Terrible Setback'

bheading Re:...but if you want free software to improve... (1098 comments)

That's part of why LLVM is better than gcc today.

Certainly, the project has obtained its objective of being a simpler, faster compiler free of the FSF's politics.

But it isn't "better than GCC". It is targeted pretty much exclusively at x86 and looking at the project's website many features are missing from other architectures (such as the assembly parser I note). I also see no sign of advanced GCC features such as stack smashing protection, mudflap and so on.

about 9 months ago
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FSF's Richard Stallman Calls LLVM a 'Terrible Setback'

bheading Re:...but if you want free software to improve... (1098 comments)

The GPL approach is "Here is something nice I made - you can use it, but if you you have to let me play with you stuff.

This is a grossly inaccurate mischaracterisation.

The GPL approach is just like the BSD "Here is something nice I made - have it and do what you like, hope you have fun!". You can do whatever you want with the code. You can modify it, add features to it etc. You don't have to share the source unless you redistribute it. You repay the community who created the original work with your own enhancements to it.

about 9 months ago
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Kernel DBus Now Boots With Systemd On Fedora

bheading Re:More Bloat ? (341 comments)

Agreed. And look who's behind it - Poettering. Run for your lives!

about 10 months ago
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Linux x32 ABI Not Catching Wind

bheading x32 is a premature optimization (262 comments)

The idea makes sense in theory. Build binaries that are going to be smaller (32-bit binaries have smaller pointers compared with 64-bit) and faster (because the code is smaller, in theory cache should be used more efficiently and accesses to external memory should be reduced).

But I suspect the problem is that the benefits simply outweigh the inconvenience of having to run with an entirely separate ABI. I doubt the average significant C program spends a lot of time doing direct addressing, and as such I suspect the size benefits of using 32-bit pointers is overstated.

about 10 months ago
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Geeks For Monarchy: The Rise of the Neoreactionaries

bheading Re:hrm (730 comments)

so that the upper chamber stops being a reasonably impartial bunch of old guys who do what's right because its right

Read a few history books for cryin' out loud. There was (and to some extent, still is) nothing reasonable about the House of Lords. Back in the day many of the peers were hereditary ie only there because of their bloodline. At crucial points they interfered to try to block the democratically elected government - over welfare reform (back in Lloyd George's day) over Irish independence/Home Rule, and a zillion other things. Recently they even made noises about blocking gay marriage.

This is an institution with no mandate and no accountability to the electorate. It defies belief that someone could characterize their out of touch interference as some sort of positive influence.

about a year ago
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25,000-Drive Study Gives Insight On How Long Hard Drives Actually Last

bheading Re:Only four years? (277 comments)

On the contrary.

As drives get larger (4TB is now readily available) they are not getting any faster.

Correspondingly, matters such as RAID rebuilds become a real issue. It takes about 12 hours for our NetApp 2020 unit to rebuild a 1TB drive, and that's with relatively low load; so a 2 day rebuild time is probably not far away. The probability of a further failure within that timeframe means you're taking a risk.

about a year ago
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25,000-Drive Study Gives Insight On How Long Hard Drives Actually Last

bheading Re:No one else? (277 comments)

From Section 5, Conclusions :

"In this study we report on the failure characteristics of consumer-grade disk drives ... "

about a year ago

Submissions

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glibc Steering Committee Dissolves; Switches To Co-Operative Development Model

bheading bheading writes  |  more than 2 years ago

bheading (467684) writes "Following years under controversial leadership which, among other things, led to a fork (which was in turn adopted by some of the major distributions) the glibc development process has been reinvented to follow a slightly more informal, community-based model. Here's hoping glibc benefits from a welcome dose of pragmatism."
Link to Original Source
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Lynch law prevalent on Wikipedia

bheading bheading writes  |  more than 7 years ago

bheading (467684) writes "Recently a pal of mine logged into Wikipedia (where he has contributed many articles on Turkey, politics, amateur radio, and other matters over the past few years) to find that he'd been blocked as a sockpuppet — this despite the fact that he posts under his real name. So, he logged in at work to submit a request to be unblocked — and found that his work address was already blocked. He then submitted the request protesting his innocence as soon as he got home — but awoke the following morning to find that his home IP had also now been blocked as having been used by a sockpuppet. Then, Gerry blogged the matter to bring his problem to the attention of other friendly Netizens, others who weighted in to protest his innocence found themselves blocked as well. Further investigation has shown that the formal Wikipedia blocking process was not followed, leading to suspicions of political bias. Wikipedia's getting to be a rough place if you can be silenced for your political views, then silenced automatically for merely attempting to protest that decision — and then your friends get silenced for coming to your aid. Have any other Slashdotters encountered problems like this lately ?"

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