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Comments

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Linux 3.11 Officially Named "Linux For Workgroups"

bhtooefr Re: Linux 8 (376 comments)

No, it didn't. Well, maybe by Linux fans.

It got panned for not running Windows software, and Linux netbooks had something like a 25% return rate, when their Windows counterparts were much lower.

about 9 months ago
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Pirate Radio Station In Florida Jams Automotive Electronics

bhtooefr Re:RTFM (315 comments)

Assuming it's working properly.

My VW's system is supposed to do that, but because it doesn't sense the door unlocking or opening properly, the alarm stays armed, and you then get the alarm going off when you try to start the car.

about a year ago
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Linux Is a Lemon On the Retina MacBook Pro

bhtooefr Re:Linux on Mac?! (780 comments)

GP also mentioned that nobody is making anything better than 1080p, which is what I was refuting.

about a year and a half ago
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Linux Is a Lemon On the Retina MacBook Pro

bhtooefr Re:This was incidentally the machine (780 comments)

My frankenpad began as a T60p (15.0" 4:3, by the way, I forgot to mention that), with just the LCD swap, maxed out RAM, and a 2 GHz Core Duo, and I stuck with Windows 7 on that build (my experience on OS X being subpar, having used it extensively on an iBook G4, and being frustrated with the speed).

Then after a while, things were failing, the chassis was damaged, and I was getting sick of the RAM limitations, so I got a nice refurb T60 15.0" 4:3 cheaply, ripped out all the T60 bits, put T61p bits in (which is what required filing part of the chassis away), swapped my LCD over, and ran with it for a while.

Then, the screen started failing right before the MBPR was announced, so I jumped ship to OS X, and I'm liking it now that I have a fast machine.

about a year ago
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Linux Is a Lemon On the Retina MacBook Pro

bhtooefr Re:Linux on Mac?! (780 comments)

It's not your only choice, it's just your only choice that's currently available.

Plenty of 1920x1200 options if you go back to Core 2, a few at Nehalem, and a couple at Sandy Bridge. (Some of those in the Core 2 and Nehalem days are even 15".)

Also, if you go back to Core 2, and don't mind some frankensteining, you can get an IDTech IAQX10, IAQX10N, or IAQX10S panel, a ThinkPad T60 or T60p, and a T61p 14.1" 4:3 motherboard, heatsink, Socket P CPU, and PCMCIA slot assembly, and put them all together. Need to reflash the panel's EDID ROM, and file some stuff away from the chassis, but the end result is up to the following:

2048x1536 IPS display
2.6 GHz Core 2 Duo Penryn
Quadro FX 570M (but crippled, and 128 MiB VRAM only)
8 GiB RAM
Whatever SSD you want, but IIRC it's constrained to SATA 2 speeds (maybe SATA 1, actually)

With less frankensteining, you can run the T60p board, and get up to the following:

2.33 GHz Core 2 Duo Merom
FireGL V5250
3 GiB RAM
Whatever SSD you want at SATA 1 speeds

And, with zero frankensteining, you can find an ultra-rare config of the ThinkPad R50p, which means up to (I think):

1.7 GHz Pentium M
Radeon 9200 or so IIRC
I think 2 GiB RAM?
Whatever PATA SSD you can find

The T61p/T60p frankenstein is what I ran before getting a MacBook Pro Retina, I'm a bit of a pixel whore.

about a year ago
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John Romero's Doomy View On Android and Ouya

bhtooefr Re:Windows is a piracy platform too (375 comments)

There were certainly attempts at copy protection, though, largely relating to either weird disk track stepping mechanisms, disk defects that copying software didn't properly copy, and the like. I think there was the odd dongle, too.

about a year and a half ago
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John Romero's Doomy View On Android and Ouya

bhtooefr Re:False (375 comments)

Of course, Bumpgate hit all the x86 business laptops with discrete graphics, too. ATI didn't have anything competitive performance-wise at the time, so everyone went with 8000 series Nvidia stuff.

Basically, 2007-2008 was a bad time to buy a new laptop with discrete graphics.

about a year and a half ago
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The 300 km/h Superbus

bhtooefr Re:Ok... (180 comments)

Metal wheels on metal rail have significantly lower rolling resistance than rubber tires on asphalt or concrete, though. And, the infrastructure for rail is better suited to providing electricity to a train (partially because there's already metal to metal contact) than the infrastructure for roads.

about 2 years ago
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Home Office To Ignore Wikipedia Founder's Petition Against O'Dwyer Extradition

bhtooefr Re:Conservative party Minister: so pro USA (276 comments)

The Republicans here in the US are often approaching Europe's right-wing terrorists, actually.

Literally, a lot of the right-wing rhetoric that gets spewed wouldn't look out of place in Breivik's manifesto.

about 2 years ago
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Georgia Apple Store Refuses To Sell iPad To Iranian-American Teen

bhtooefr Re:is this iranian apple employee banned from buyi (1116 comments)

The clerk actually prevented HIMSELF from violating the law, too, as he would be personally liable, knowing that she was going to export it.

Of course, he opened Apple up to a civil suit for discrimination, most likely. Damned if he did, damned if he didn't.

about 2 years ago
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Bloomberg, WSJ: Student Aid Increases Tuition

bhtooefr Re:Go to college. End up broke. (433 comments)

Or you die.

Wonder how long before there's mass suicide to discharge student loans.

about 2 years ago
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Odd Laptop-Tablet Hybrids Show PC Makers' Panic

bhtooefr Re:WTF? (251 comments)

There's actually another way to do it, that GEOS and webOS's Enyo framework did. Actually, even Windows Mobile's implementation of .NET did this to an extent, IIRC. Android half-asses it, but it at least tries - there's separate phone and tablet UIs in the same application.

Don't let programs draw their UI, make them give a list of tasks to the OS, and make the OS draw the UI that's appropriate for the device you're on. (GEOS, at least, had hinting of sorts, IIRC, to note the priority of tasks.)

Use the same binary across all devices.

So, on a phone, you get a simple UI that lets you do stuff that's appropriate for doing on a phone.

On a tablet, you get a more fully fleshed UI, but still touch-friendly.

On a desktop, you get a full desktop UI.

The added benefit of this is, the UI can never be inconsistent with system standards.

about 2 years ago
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Odd Laptop-Tablet Hybrids Show PC Makers' Panic

bhtooefr Re:WTF? (251 comments)

And, there were consumption device-class tablets back then, too.

They were basically the "internet appliances", shoved into a resistive tablet form. And they all failed miserably. Part of it because of performance, part of it because there wasn't a strong software ecosystem, part of it because they didn't have a strong premium consumer electronics brand attached to them (that is, part of the reason why Apple is so good at launching products is because they're Apple, and people will buy Apple stuff, and due to network effects, a platform needs to be successful to be successful (it also didn't hurt that Apple started with a phone OS that was already successful)).

about 2 years ago
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Where Are All the High-Resolution Desktop Displays?

bhtooefr Re:A tad longer than that (565 comments)

Although Catleap et. al. shows that there is a market for defective displays.

(That's how they get their panels so cheap, FWIW.)

about 2 years ago
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The Poor Waste More Time On Digital Entertainment

bhtooefr Re:Diaspora: your own social network (515 comments)

IME, the thing that Diaspora needs more than anything is massive optimization.

When it's taking 30-60 seconds per page load from a 1.1 GHz P3, and it's not due to swapping, but rather sheer CPU load...

about 2 years ago
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The Poor Waste More Time On Digital Entertainment

bhtooefr Re:How DARE they! (515 comments)

The irony is, what is a BBS if not a social network of sorts, that you can play door games on, and chat with your friends?

(Granted, very few people are setting up their own social networks...)

about 2 years ago
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MPAA Agent Poses As Homebuyer To Catch Pirates

bhtooefr Re:Clarify (289 comments)

Because they pay the tax authorities and auditors to look the other way.

about 2 years ago
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Ask Slashdot: How To Shop For a Laptop?

bhtooefr Re:Business only! (732 comments)

And the comment you linked to runs contrary to my experience.

The real business grade laptops - not just from a manufacturer's business line, but the ones that are considered high-end - tend to be built from more durable materials, tend to be designed for easier service, tend to be documented better, and tend to have better support.

Workstation-class, and one step down as far as position in the model range (which often shares hardware with the workstation class, but often with a dual-core and either integrated graphics or a low-end GPU), tend to count as those.

about 2 years ago
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Diesel-Like Engine Could Boost Fuel Economy By 50%

bhtooefr Re:From a buffoon (721 comments)

Which is why you leave a trucking infrastructure in place, but leave it idle, and use rail normally.

Ramp up the trucking in an emergency.

about 2 years ago

Submissions

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Let's Protest A Nightmare on Elm Street

bhtooefr bhtooefr writes  |  more than 3 years ago

bhtooefr writes "I've posted a blog entry suggesting that the best way to stop the MPAA and RIAA is to protest high-profile movie releases and concerts. So, why not get started? Let's organize a protest of the release of A Nightmare on Elm Street. April 30 is when it'll be released — far enough away that I think we can organize something. Get it into the public's mind that the MPAA wants to violate their rights, point them at a site to explain this in detail, and get our message out there. Maybe we can chip away at the MPAA and RIAA directly, this way."
Link to Original Source
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Oracle Charging For Solaris Patches, Info

bhtooefr bhtooefr writes  |  more than 4 years ago

bhtooefr writes "It looks like Oracle's already making changes for the worse at Sun. Dennis Clarke posted on OpenSolaris's discussion list, claiming that Oracle is planning on requiring a support contract for any patches for Solaris, including security patches. Oracle has silently posted a document that appears to state that change in policy regarding patches. (Previously, non-security patches could be manually downloaded for free without a support contract, and security patches could be automatically updated for free.) In addition, Clarke claims that access to SunSolve, which contains documentation on Solaris patches and Sun hardware, will soon be restricted to those with an active support contract."
Link to Original Source

Journals

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New Blog - changes in this journal

bhtooefr bhtooefr writes  |  more than 8 years ago

Reviews will stay in this journal. I may still ask for advice in this journal, as well.

However, anything else - especially stuff in my life, is moving to my blog: http://score5ot.blogspot.com/

Yeah, there's not much in there yet...

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Grr... Got a broken USB connector...

bhtooefr bhtooefr writes  |  more than 8 years ago

My Kingston UFD died today, after the connector getting bent about a month ago..

I opened it up, and looked inside. This is a quick sketch in Paint of the connector now...

I tried using my soldering iron, but couldn't get it in the area, and couldn't get the broken wires hot enough to melt the solder... Any suggestions?

I can't find my old Lexar UFD to steal the connector from, or I'd remove the whole USB connector from the Kingston drive and solder down the Lexar's.

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Need help finding a program

bhtooefr bhtooefr writes  |  more than 8 years ago

I've googled like hell today, looking for a free OBEX file transfer program for Windows 95 (long, long story - it appears Nokia uses OBEX for IR file transfer, and the PC Suite is too big and requires Win98). Here are my requirements (quite simple, really):

It needs to fit on one floppy disk - I DON'T want to mess with ZIP spanning, and floppies are the only way to get data on and off of this computer (no CD drive).
It needs to be somewhat easy to use.
It needs to be able to list files on the device (I don't know how hard that is).
It needs to grab files from the device, but not necessarily send them to the device.

If anybody can think of a program that can meet my needs, PLEASE REPLY!

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Kingston DataTraveler II 256MB Review

bhtooefr bhtooefr writes  |  more than 8 years ago

Cost: $28.00 (ZipZoomFly.com, 2005-05-03)
Approx. $0.11/MB

Package: Drive only

Included software: SecureTraveler

Drive features: Minimal

Drive speed: USB 2.0
Read: Fast (11MB/s theoretical)
Write: Fast (7MB/s theoretical)

Cap retention:
New: Excellent

Physical durability: Very good

Electronic durability: Good, but read the update

Physical Size: Thick, but still fits in a dual-stack port.

Power consumption: 100mA according to Windows XP SP1, but my Belkin USB 1.1 hub (which I can't get WinXP to recognize as a powered hub - only as an unpowered) doesn't have enough power to drive it, even though it is rated as 100mA per port when in unpowered mode.

Upshot: This'll get updated, but here's what I have to say now. It seems like a VERY solid drive, with many good design characteristics. However, ZipZoomFly has an error on their product page for this drive - they say it includes a lanyard (which was one of the reasons I chose this particular drive - I'm never going back to storing the drive in my pocket), but it does not. Actually, I'm going to go on a limb and say that Kingston changed the product itself, because Kingston's page has the same description, except without the "with lanyard". FWIW, it's not like it'll cost a lot to get a lanyard for it...

Update 2005-06-04: The drive is broken :-( The USB connector got bent about a month ago (I HATE laptop USB ports...), and the connector finally broke on the inside. Read my latest JE for more... FWIW, I'm NOT attributing this one to poor engineering, but rather carelessness on my part. A friend who had a 512MB SanDisk Cruzer Mini did the same exact thing to hers. Mine lasted for a month after it happened, so not so bad...

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SanDisk Cruzer Mini 256MB Review

bhtooefr bhtooefr writes  |  more than 8 years ago

Cost: $34.99 - $10 MIR = $24.99 (Office Depot, 2004-12)
Approx. $0.10/MB

Package: Drive, lanyard, two extra caps

Included software: CruzerLock v1.1 (SanDisk is now offering a larger software bundle)

Drive features: Minimal

Drive speed: USB 2.0
Read: Fast
Write: Slow
No manufacturer theoretical speeds available

Cap retention:
New: Good
After 1 month: Poor
After 3 months: Very Poor

Physical durability: Good

Electronic durability: Good

Physical Size: Very slim - fits in a dual-stack port

Power consumption: >100mA (requires a powered port)

Upshot: I would buy another of these, but I would be much more careful with the caps. Those figures on cap retention are with load balancing all three caps, and they still wore down that quickly. Also, the power consumption worries me a bit. Durability testing didn't go long, because the drive got stolen.

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Lexar JumpDrive Elite 128MB Review

bhtooefr bhtooefr writes  |  more than 8 years ago

Cost: $34.88 (Wal-Mart, 2004-04)
Approx. $0.27/MB

Package: Drive only

Included software: None

Drive features: Minimal

Drive speed: USB 2.0
Read: Fast (8MB/s theoretical)
Write: Moderate (6MB/s theoretical)

Cap retention:
New: Good
After 1 month: Good
After 3 months: Good
After 6 months: Fair

Physical durability: Fair

Electronic durability: Very Poor

Physical Size: Very thick, will not fit in a dual-stack port, or some on-keyboard ports.

Power consumption: <100mA, can be used on a bus-powered hub.

Upshot: This one lasted eight months. The failure of this drive led me away from Lexar, but it wasn't exactly a BAD drive. The package could have been better, though, and the drive could have been smaller - when I tried to get it working again, I found lots of open space in the case.

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Lexar JumpDrive Classic 64MB Review

bhtooefr bhtooefr writes  |  more than 8 years ago

I never got around to reviewing my flash drives, so here goes the first of several... BTW, I'm using a different format. Descriptions of each field (if necessary) are in italics after the field.

Cost: $19.99 - $10 MIR = $9.99 (OfficeMax, 2003-09)
Approx. $0.16/MB

Package: Drive only
This field is used to describe what comes with the drive. Lanyards, driver CDs, and the like.

Included software: None
This category is used for both software preloaded on the drive and software on driver CDs.

Drive features: Write-protect switch
This field is NOT used for features provided by included software, i.e. encryption. It is used for things like write-protection, biometrics, etc., which are at least partially implemented in hardware.

Drive speed: USB 1.1
This field will be used to mention the USB version implemented by the drive, and will normally have Read and Write subfields. Subjective analyses (read: wicked fast, fast, moderate, slow, and molasses) of speeds, along with manufacturer-provided theoretical speeds will be listed. However, since it has been a while since this drive has been working, I don't remember the speeds of this one, and Lexar's site doesn't even have theoretical speeds for this model.

Cap retention:
New: Poor
After 1 month: Poor
After 3 months: What cap?
Cap retention is more important than it seems. Often, the caps wear out, exposing the USB connector to dirt and moisture. If the drive does not use a cap (i.e., a SanDisk Cruzer Titanium - no, I don't have one), I would use N/A here.

Physical durability: Good

Electronic durability: Very Poor
Note that this can be affected by the other items - a missing cap, or a broken case, could kill the drive much faster.

Physical Size: Very thin, can be used in a dual-stack port.

Power consumption: <100mA, can be used on a bus-powered hub.

Upshot: Don't touch it with a 10-foot pole. Within four months, mine was dead. If you DO get one, be VERY CAREFUL with the cap, as I think losing the cap was the cause of the failure.

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Apache Troubles

bhtooefr bhtooefr writes  |  more than 9 years ago

I'm trying to get Apache working right on an internal system. The system is running Windows 2000 Pro SP4, PHP 4.3.10, MySQL 4.0.23, Apache 2.0.53, phpMyAdmin 2.6.1, and WordPress 1.5.

When I view the site from the server, it works fine. However, the ONLY file loaded if I view it from another system is index.php - no CSS, no nothing. Attempting to view any other page (e.g., wp-admin/index.php) results in the browser not being able to find the server. What am I doing wrong?

The httpd.conf file is at: http://bhtooefr.freeshell.org/httpd.conf This is not the server it is running on - the server it is running on is an intranet server. I am using the IP address to connect - 10.42.0.135.

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NOOOOOOOOO!

bhtooefr bhtooefr writes  |  more than 9 years ago

I got bit hard in the ass by Murphy's Law last night :-(

I went to fix a spyware-infested system, plugged in my trusty Lexar JumpDrive Elite 128MB (yes, calling out the exact model - it's not an ad - read on), and NOTHING. I then plugged it into my laptop (good thing I brought it with me - I ended up using it a LOT), and only got "USB Device not recognized" errors. DAMN IT!

So, here's my question: What, in your experience, is the best drive I can get? It has to be something Wal-Mart has in a physical store (because I've got $50 locked in a gift card), and it cannot be Lexar brand (I've been burned twice by dying Lexar drives). Their product page for USB drives is http://www.walmart.com/catalog/product_listing.gsp?bti=0&cat=183488&dept=3944&path=0%3A3944%3A3951%3A182278%3A183488&sb=79&sdir=sasc&sortBySelectedIndex=1&showAll=true&selected_items=na. I'm looking hard at the SanDisk Cruzer Mini 256MB, but want to know other people's experiences.

EDIT: I ended up getting the SanDisk drive I had been looking at, but used other Christmas money to get it from Office Depot instead ($3 to enter a $10 prize lottery? I'll bite!)

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Switching a phone from Verizon to Sprint

bhtooefr bhtooefr writes  |  more than 9 years ago

My Sprint phone was stolen. I have a friend who is offering up his old Verizon phone (it had gotten stolen, and he got it back, but had already gotten a replacement). He says that he's got a friend at the Verizon store who can unlock it. My question is: can I get Sprint to take this phone, and if so, what words do I use to socially engineer Sprint into taking it's IMEI number into it's database? I don't know the model yet, but I do know that it is an LG flip-phone with a monochrome screen (yeah, I know how much help that is). The Verizon phones should be capable of all of the frequencies of the Sprint network.

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Good day for Pentium M lovers

bhtooefr bhtooefr writes  |  more than 9 years ago

DFI's Pentium M motherboard, the 855GME-MGF, was released today. Estimates of cost, though, are $250-$275 (GamePC).

GamePC reviewed AOpen's Pentium M board, the i855GMEm-LFS, and will be selling them once they get stock. Yes, AOpen's releasing to the US market. They are also estimating that they'll sell for $250 to $275.

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DFI P-M board announced, will be in NA on 8th

bhtooefr bhtooefr writes  |  more than 9 years ago

Built-in OC capabilities (the P-M has an unlocked multiplier, as DFI found out - this board supports it), and (after a voltmod) x86-secret got it to 2.8GHz with a 2.1GHz part. It obliterated an a64 4000+ at that speed. Oh, and all of this was with a northbridge cooler as the heatsink (DFI didn't put a P4 heatsink bracket on, unlike Radisys and AOpen, because they didn't want to deal with AXP-esque core crushing incidents).

It'll the first P-M desktop board to hit the US, and the third (IIRC) P-M board that could be obtained in single quantities in the US (including Commell's board and Lippert's board). This board design appears to be based on their G5M100-N, a Mini-ITX board. Also, x86-Secret (the site that OC'd it), which appears to be The French Hardware Review Site(tm), participated in the design of the board (from what I understand... I've also heard that they participated in the design of the ill-fated PL-iPM (guesstimated name from other PowerLeap product names)). The somewhat official forum for this board is: http://forum.x86-secret.com/viewforum.php?f=16. The fact that the site that reviewed it might have partially designed it does mean that the benchmarks are somewhat tainted, though, so we need to see whether Anand, TR, and [H] get the same results.

This was rejected (no, I didn't write it like THAT, I was just typing quickly this time around), so it's going up here. I added a few^Wbunch of things I found out after submitting the article.

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MaxiVista Review

bhtooefr bhtooefr writes  |  more than 9 years ago

MaxiVista is a product that lets you use another computer (let's say, your laptop, or an old beat up desktop) as a second monitor via a network. Windows is actually totally unaware of the fact that it is software - it thinks that there's another graphics card in there. I tried the demo version, to see if it could help alleviate my dual-monitor woes (damn you, Microsoft, for making it say "(Multiple Monitors) on Intel(R) 82845G/GL/GE/PE/GV Graphics Controller", even though it doesn't support dual-monitors...) Here goes...

The Good: VERY fast. While I didn't try playing DVDs in a window moving between two laptops, neither of which are the host system (couldn't, even if I wanted to - the demo doesn't support it), I did do some light stretching of windows (ah, maybe a VS.net window, and a quick Moz-based VB app that I had whipped up before in between the two monitors), and played with it. The network was hardly optimal for this sort of thing, and it was almost as responsive on monitor 2 as on 1. The only thing more responsive that I had played with on that network was Remote Desktop Connection, and not by much (forget about non-Tight VNC without UltraVNC's video driver)... It didn't want to connect, but I'm not blaming that on it - the network was hardly friendly to that sort of thing. Setup was fairly easy. Also, if you have the full version, the viewer program is smaller than 300KB.

The Bad: It costs $50. Still, it's better than the other option for dual-headed laptops (the Telegnosis/MCT/Tritton/Sitecom/whoever can buy the boards from Telegnosis/and their brothers USB2 to VGA adaptor), which is $90. Granted, this thing DOES need more hardware (another computer), but it basically needs to be able to run Windows 98 (or a VERY minimalistic Linux with Wine - that is acknowledged by the company to work, but isn't supported), and be on a network. You can get something that does that for free.

The Ugly: What ugly? It seems to work just fine.

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Playing with Ubuntu 4.1

bhtooefr bhtooefr writes  |  more than 9 years ago

I'd heard of Ubuntu, so I'm going to play around with it some...

Now, since my laptop runs Windows (and needs to), and I don't want to shrink the partition, and my other box, well, sucks ass, I'm using Virtual PC for this review, giving Ubuntu 96MB RAM (any more, and it won't work).

From what I've seen so far (the packages are installing now), it's a VERY simple text-mode installer. The masses will still want GUI, but it's pretty nice as it is. Just word a couple of questions a little better, and the masses can understand it.

Another JE once Ubuntu's installed, and I've had time to play with it.

Update: Ubuntu installed fine, except for one tiny problem. It appears that it tried to push the emulated GPU into 24-bit mode... which isn't supported. I had to fix that...

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Multimonitor support in XP

bhtooefr bhtooefr writes  |  more than 9 years ago

I have a Dell Inspiron 1100 laptop with the 14.1" XGA display. I also have an RIC 17" monitor capable of 1280x1024. The Display Properties control panel shows Multiple Monitors. However, I can't for the life of me figure out how to make it dual-headed. Windows recognizes both monitors. The GPU is an Intel i845GL. Although it's not listed in the supported GPUs for DualView, it IS a descendant of the i810, the one supported Intel GPU.

Win2VNC isn't an option - I only have one network cable going into this room (I do have an old Linux box in here, but no other network cables :-()

Also, if I HAVE to, I'll get one of the Tritton USB2 to VGA adaptors. FWIW, I think they will work on Linux, as long as their video chip is supported. The PCI to USB chip in this thing IS supported by the manufacturer under Linux. As I understand it, the drivers are even open source.

Update: I e-mailed the actual manufacturer of all of the USB2-VGA adaptors, Telegnosis. They replied that it was a GPU of their own creation...

Update: I played with Win2VNC on another box, and that didn't work well at all. I DID grab a MaxiVista demo, and that worked nicely. MaxiVista is supported under Wine. $50 + another 25ft. network cable (free, most likely) versus $90...

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Voting Software for a Mock Election

bhtooefr bhtooefr writes  |  more than 9 years ago

I'm looking at setting up a mock election for my school, and am wondering what I should do as for voting software. Supporting approval voting would be a plus, and so would supporting mixed voting types (read: one page of approval, one page of plurality, maybe even a page of IRV or something). Also, running on Windows would be a plus, but is not necessary. Free, especially open source, is almost a must.

Is there such a program that can do all of this, or am I better off whipping something up in Visual Basic, or even tracking down a Florida Vote-O-Matic and a reader?

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GE Mini Optical Mouse

bhtooefr bhtooefr writes  |  more than 9 years ago

I got this mouse at Big Lots (for those that don't know, it's a store that sells extra cheap crappy stuff and discontinued items, among other things) for $12.99.

The Good: It's got a retractable cord that works fairly well, and it Just Works(tm). Not much that can go wrong. Also, it has a coupon for a 6ft. USB extension cable (not necessary if you're using the mouse with a laptop) after $5 s&h (I could post the details, so that ANYONE could get the cable if they wanted, AFAICT)

The Bad: The cord isn't the GREATEST - Belkin's retractable cell phone car cords have a LOT better retracting mechanism, but this gets the job done. Also, it just doesn't fit in the palm of your hand, but that's not a feature you're looking for in a mini mouse.

The Ugly: Nothing wrong here...

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Presidential Debates - My Verdict (from what I could stand)

bhtooefr bhtooefr writes  |  more than 9 years ago

I tried to watch most of the debate, but I had other things to do.

Anyway, here's what I saw:

Kerry usually answered questions more closely to the actual question than Bush did.

Bush lied out his ass, as usual.

Kerry was trying to cover up his flipflopping, and I could detect a bit of flipflop in the debate.

Now, why are the debates so damn scripted? Can't we just get them together with a camera, and no moderator? Put a screen in to display questions from anonymous sources (they could either be first e-mail recieved that hasn't been asked, random e-mail in between questions, or last e-mail recieved before question is pulled). Put lights in to signal length of answer (I do agree that they need that - give a politician unlimited time, and he'll take it).

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