Beta
×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

We are sorry to see you leave - Beta is different and we value the time you took to try it out. Before you decide to go, please take a look at some value-adds for Beta and learn more about it. Thank you for reading Slashdot, and for making the site better!

Comments

top

Doubling Saturated Fat In Diet Does Not Increase It In Blood

bill_mcgonigle Re: So low carb vindicated again (189 comments)

hey, it reduces end-of-life welfare costs by killing off the population more quickly. The "food pyramid" is good policy if you're a sociopathic bankrupt program.

I got a full blood panel before and after doing a ketosis diet for four months. All my numbers were much better, but to be succinct my total relative risk metric for coronary heart disease (1.0 is average) fell from 0.8 to 0.3. I was using a half gallon of heavy cream and several cups of coconut oil every week. Some bacon and steaks too. Plenty of nuts and cheese.

Most people see similar results. None of these blood tests are new science. All of these studies could have been done in 1980. I wonder if they were.

yesterday
top

Mozilla's 2013 Report: Revenue Up 1% To $314M; 90% From Google

bill_mcgonigle Re:How's this going to work (147 comments)

With 90% of their revenue coming from Google yet they just signed a 5 year deal with Yahoo how is this going to work out?

I guess we'll see, but Yahoo is probably guaranteeing at least as much revenue as Google, for the opportunity to be the default search engine.

So that gives MoFo five years to have FirefoxOS take over the smartphone market.

Bwaahahahah.

I'm sorry, that was wrong.

2 days ago
top

The EU Has a Plan To Break Up Google

bill_mcgonigle Re:In an unrelated news item... (290 comments)

Population count (507 mio. vs. 319 mio.) and GDP (18.4 trio. US$ vs. 16.8 trio. US$).

Given their superior regulatory environment, why does the EU only make less than 70% per-capita of what the US makes? Especially given that many US-headquartered companies are recognizing most of their revenue in Ireland.

2 days ago
top

Harvard Scientists Say It's Time To Start Thinking About Engineering the Climate

bill_mcgonigle Re:We've been doing it for a long time (310 comments)

The whole global warming scare made it abundantly obvious that the current state of science (plus politics) is incapable of intelligently managing the climate, or perhaps even managing it at all, much less intelligently.

But, hey, look what Harvard Economists have done with engineering the economy! Can't we have some ivory tower academics "fixing" the planet too?

But seriously, an upper-bound projected sea level rise of 4 inches is completely unprecedented, so we should seek to thwart the productive capacity of humanity, and whatever happens, don't put one tenth of that money into ensuring clean water for every human on Earth, eliminating malaria, or building fusion reactors. Where the regulatory victory in that?!

2 days ago
top

Aereo Files For Bankruptcy

bill_mcgonigle Re:One solution (132 comments)

If you must be entertained, find alternative sources, from indie stuff all the way to pirating.

Or - I know this will sound crazy - getting out and involved with your community instead of passively receiving 'entertainment' from the glowing screen.

2 days ago
top

Ask Slashdot: What's the Most Hackable Car?

bill_mcgonigle Re:OBD2 (184 comments)

and a matching array of iOS and Android apps that will read all the engine stats off the dongle onto pretty dials on your phone or tablet.

Yet some OBD2 ports output certain data elements and other don't.

I was looking for battery voltage with Torque on my Forester, and it's a non-reported value, though other cars support it.

I'm sure somebody maintains a wiki with the matrix of models and values.

Though when he said "most hackable" I was thinking '82 F150 - no special tools required at all.

2 days ago
top

Aereo Files For Bankruptcy

bill_mcgonigle Re:innovation thwarted (132 comments)

They were taking OTA signals and retransmitting them across the internet for profit without paying the broadcaster a dime.

So, exactly like broadcast.

You don't see a problem with this?

Of course not - do you have a problem with broadcast? That's the very business model the broadcasters are in. Aereo was in the business of being an outsourced antenna provider - what problem could you possibly have with that?

If anything, Aereo was bringing them additional customers to watch their ads.

All this is is the broadcast corporations wanting to get in on some sort of nebulous not-yet-defined Internet business model that they think will make them even richer. A company (Aereo) is now out of business, all those jobs lost, the advancement of science and the useful arts is diminished, customers no longer have a service they value, and what - for the possibility of further enriching six multinational corporations?

The government fucks up again, news at 11. Or not, because all the news is owned by six multinational corporations.

2 days ago
top

Lessons Learned From Google's Green Energy Bust

bill_mcgonigle Re: This is a good reminder for all technocrats (213 comments)

government sponsors the basic research, then they kill it, then they prevent industry from commercializing it when it would threaten extant corporate profits, especially in energy, and by extension military spending and petrodollar advantage. Google 'integral fast reactor', Branson, etc.

We've known how to make all the clean energy we need and clean up our nuclear waste problem at the same time for the past 20 years. We have a government problem, not a technical one.

3 days ago
top

US Intelligence Unit Launches $50k Speech Recognition Competition

bill_mcgonigle Re: Nope. (62 comments)

Only 50k to sell my soul for having them spy on more people... including myself?
Nope.

Of course not you - but the kinds of people who will submit are going to get job offers from the NRO. They are willing to make that deal, they're not bright enough to run off to industry, and they might have a glimmer of talent that cannot be cultivated in the university system. Plus, $50k isn't enough to quit and start a company, so it's a well-considered recruiting effort.

3 days ago
top

What Would Have Happened If Philae Were Nuclear Powered?

bill_mcgonigle Re:That's the problem, you can't get U238 anymore. (493 comments)

There's ways to MAKE more, and improve nuclear power at the same time. But nobody wants to talk about it.

You mean like France, which has lots of nuclear power, active plutonium extraction and reprocessing capability? I don't want to get the ESA all tangled up with France or anything, but if they asked nicely...

3 days ago
top

Congress Suggests Moat, Electronic Fence To Protect White House

bill_mcgonigle Jefferson (211 comments)

Jefferson used to complain about the long line of people at the White House who were there to see him - most of them looking for a job hand-out, but some with legitimate issues for him to deal with.

Perhaps Congress could start by dissolving the enivronment that has caused so many people to want to do antisocial things like harming a President, who is mostly supposed to be a CEO of the government, and occasionally lead a defensive war against the country.

Oh, nm, that's just crazy-talk. Might as well fill the moat with hunter-killer boats from Lockheed.

3 days ago
top

Halting Problem Proves That Lethal Robots Cannot Correctly Decide To Kill Humans

bill_mcgonigle Re:humans can never decide this issue either (316 comments)

No, they can't and it shows.

A STRANGE GAME ... THE ONLY WINNING MOVE IS NOT TO PLAY.

HOW ABOUT A NICE GAME OF CHESS?

anti-lameness: qq ww ee rr tt yy uu ii oo pp aa ss dd ff gg hh jj kk ll zz xx cc vv bb nn mm

3 days ago
top

Republicans Block Latest Attempt At Curbing NSA Power

bill_mcgonigle Re:So basically (428 comments)

Does it make me a crony capitalist or a welfare queen when I decide I'd rather the power go to those I can vote out of office than those I can't?

If you think voting significantly changes the government, that just makes you naive. The bureaucrats run most things and are unaccountable.

If the entire government became Libertarian today, it would take less than 10 years for corporations to take total control of governance

Do you mean they'd have private armies in the streets? Like in the US from 1776-1870, before permanent corporations were legal?

3 days ago
top

Head of FCC Proposes Increasing Internet School Fund

bill_mcgonigle Re:Let me be the first to say (104 comments)

I already pay a small fortune in school tax. Let them find the money for it from there.

Last I checked, my local government school has a 3 meg connection because that's what Comcast gives them for free. They have a three million dollar budget but can't find $3000 a year to upgrade that to a hundred meg.

It could be that after all the teachers' salaries and benefits are paid for they don't have any money left (and considering the reams of copy paper we get home...) or it could be that high-speed internet allows remote teaching which is seen as a threat to union jobs.

I do work for one private school (area towns tuition their kids there) and they paid a lot of money to get fiber brought to their facility.

The incentives are aligned differently.

3 days ago
top

Debian Votes Against Mandating Non-systemd Compatibility

bill_mcgonigle Re:its all about choice. (534 comments)

I fail to understand the reasoning for choice as well.

I think I get this.

One example: I have a handful of shell and perl scripts that I use to manage virtual machine interdependencies at startup time - this vm needs to be listening on this port before I can think about starting this other vm, etc. and I express that in a JSON tree for configuration.

I've recently been noticing that the dependency "engine" is a bit buggy and also duplicates much of what systemd already provides (pre-dating it by some years), so I'm going to look at making it work with systemd instead and cutting out a bunch of the code. That also gets me pretty easy dependency tracking on various filesystem mounts, network status, etc., so it could be better than 'sleep 20' in some spots.

Now, if I wanted to offer that up to the community, somebody could choose to package that into Debian. Assuming my experiment works, systemd would be a hard requirement to use this particular system.

Somebody in the Debian community proposed that for this package to be accepted I would also have to [re]write another dependency engine and support that. I can't see doing that if the systemd approach works.

Does it make sense that people who don't want to run systemd (which is fine) also can't impose additional work on developers who do want to use systemd?

4 days ago
top

US Marshals Auctioning $20M Worth of Silk Road's Bitcoins

bill_mcgonigle Re:But the case hasn't even started! (119 comments)

especially since storing the bitcoin keys can't really be seen as presenting any sort of hardship to them

I would have just guessed that Lockheed Services is charging them $400K/mo to store them.

I was going to say $40K/mo, but you know, the first rule of government contracting.

4 days ago
top

Microsoft Releases Out-of-Band Security Patch For Windows

bill_mcgonigle Re:Better go kick WSUS into a sync... (176 comments)

in a nice posh fortune 500 org where such resources are available to HIM

In many cases this can be true, but consider a case where there's a zero-day in the MS TLS implementation. The only possible thing that can be done here is to have a pre-existing TLS interception mechanism deployed (local CA root on workstations with on-the-fly cert regeneration on the proxy) and have that be on a non-MS platform.

Even if that's a good idea, many F500 companies won't have that deployed, much less the F50000.

There are some situations where not only is extensive testing not possible, it's the stupid decision. I realize many corp-o-drones have CYA policies to hide behind while they make bad decisions, but I still would not want to be the guy who followed policy and got his internal network completely infested.

4 days ago
top

Microsoft Releases Out-of-Band Security Patch For Windows

bill_mcgonigle XP Killer? (176 comments)

Windows Server 2003 Service Pack 2 (Critical)

Since XP and 2003 usually go together. I didn't find a technical discussion link on the advisory but if this is the buffer overflow in the TLS library that has been making the rounds recently, this could be the one that finally kills the XP machines on the 'net.

Unless Microsoft backpedals again and enables the XP holdouts for a while longer.
 

4 days ago
top

Microsoft Releases Out-of-Band Security Patch For Windows

bill_mcgonigle Re:Better go kick WSUS into a sync... (176 comments)

If you roll out your patches the moment they come in, you are a retard ... do you enjoy running around like a headless chicken when theres a compatibility conflict?

If only security were so binary - in the real world it's a constant process of risk/reward calculations.

Is this the vulnerability the boards have been buzzing about that gives a remote code exploit by merely visiting a malicious TLS server? If so, having all your end-user machines pwned inside the firewall is not better than the risk of a compatibility conflict. One cripples an organization, the other, at worst, breaks one app.

5 days ago
top

Uber Threatens To Do 'Opposition Research' On Journalists

bill_mcgonigle Re: Wow ... (297 comments)

Have they been learning from the politicians and lobbyists?

Of course - who do you think has been attacking them for the past couple years? Now, they will say that Uber started it by threatening their 17th-Century business model of cartels and thugs, but only one actor is holding the guns.

There's an outside chance that some journalists 'investigating' Uber full-time are completely independent and not colluding with the thugs, but let's not be naieve about how the government-media complex operates.

That said, this dope from Uber should just shut up about it, and they should uncover those ties, not the personal foibles of the opposition (if for no other reason than that nobody cares).

5 days ago

Submissions

top

Snowden NSA Claims Partially Confirmed

bill_mcgonigle bill_mcgonigle writes  |  about a year and a half ago

bill_mcgonigle (4333) writes "Rep. Jerrold Nadler (D NY) disclosed that NSA analysts eavesdrop on Americans' domestic telephone calls without court orders during a House Judiciary hearing. After clearing with FBI director Robert Mueller that the information was not classified, Nadler revealed that during a closed-door briefing to Congress, the Legislature was informed that the spying organization had implemented and uses this capability. This appears to confirm Edward Snowden's claim that he could, in his position at the NSA, "wiretap anyone from you or your accountant to a federal judge to even the president." Declan McCullagh writes, "Because the same legal standards that apply to phone calls also apply to e-mail messages, text messages, and instant messages, Nadler's disclosure indicates the NSA analysts could also access the contents of Internet communications without going before a court and seeking approval." The executive branch has defended its general warrants, claiming that "the president had the constitutional authority, no matter what the law actually says, to order domestic spying without [constitutional] warrants", while Kurt Opsahl, senior staff attorney at EFF claims such government activity "epitomizes the problem of secret laws.""
top

World's First Bitcoin ATM

bill_mcgonigle bill_mcgonigle writes  |  about a year and a half ago

bill_mcgonigle writes "I just bought bitcoins from the World's first Bitcoin ATM at Liberty Forum. I created an account using an Android Bitcoin client, held up its QR code to the Raspberry Pi-based device's optical scanner, fed in a $20 Federal Reserve Note, and got back a confirmation QR code on its display (which I then scanned and checked the third-party confirmation URL). The machine can function on any wireless network and will soon be available for purchase by merchants, who can make a commission on customers' Bitcoin purchases."
Link to Original Source
top

Intel to Attempt A-la-carte Television over Internet

bill_mcgonigle bill_mcgonigle writes  |  about 2 years ago

bill_mcgonigle writes "Updating the previous story, Forbes and Gigaom are now reporting that Intel is running an internal startup aimed at offering a Internet-connected set top box with a-la-carte 'cable' channel subscriptions. They also apparently plan to record everything and offer all content on-demand. While some are skeptical that content providers will give up their cable cash cow, perhaps the economic effects of cord-cutters are finally making this business model viable."
Link to Original Source
top

Amazon Data Center Outage Takes Out Netflix & Others

bill_mcgonigle bill_mcgonigle writes  |  about 2 years ago

bill_mcgonigle writes "Many families sat down this evening to watch a Christmas Eve tale on their favorite streaming service to find a Grinch in their cloud computing service as both Netflix and Amazon Video services were unavailable (with error messages saying that their Internet connection was bad). It turns out that Amazon's East Coast data center is having yet another outage, causing a loss of service on several platforms. Other AWS-based sites are affected as well."
Link to Original Source
top

Capitalists Who Fear Change

bill_mcgonigle bill_mcgonigle writes  |  more than 2 years ago

bill_mcgonigle writes "In his essay, Capitalists Who Fear Change, author Jeffrey Tucker takes on "wimps who don’t want to improve." From DMCA take-downs on 3D printing files to the constant refrain that every new form of music recording will "kill music", Mr. Tucker observes: "Through our long history of improvement, every upgrade and every shift from old to new inspired panic. The biggest panic typically comes from the producers themselves who resent the way the market process destabilizes their business model" and analyzes how the markets move the march of technology ever forward. He takes on patents, copyrights, tariffs, and protectionism of entrenched interests in general, with guarded optimism: "The promise of the future is nothing short of spectacular — provided that those who lack the imagination to see the potential here don’t get their way.""
Link to Original Source
top

NASA Laptop Stolen With Space Station Command Codes

bill_mcgonigle bill_mcgonigle writes  |  more than 2 years ago

bill_mcgonigle writes "A year ago, NASA had an unencrypted laptop stolen, containing "algorithms used to command and control the International Space Station," according to NASA’s inspector general, Paul K. Martin. Also stolen were devices with "Social Security numbers and sensitive data on NASA’s Constellation and Orion programs." Since then, NASA has encrypted 1% of its mobile devices. Martin tells Congress, "Until NASA fully implements an Agency-wide data encryption solution, sensitive data on its mobile computing and portable data storage devices will remain at high risk for loss or theft.""
Link to Original Source
top

Deterministic Multithreading Solves Race Condition

bill_mcgonigle bill_mcgonigle writes  |  about 3 years ago

bill_mcgonigle writes "Researchers at Columbia Engineering School have developed PEREGRINE, a system that promises to improve the reliability and security of multi-threaded programs by addressing what they claim is the root cause of data race conditions in multi-threaded programs: non-determinism. Peregrine works with existing languages and "can make threads deterministic in an efficient and stable way. Peregrine can compute a plan for allowing when and where a thread can 'change lanes' and can then place barriers between the lanes, allowing threads to change lanes only at fixed locations, following a fixed order. This prevents the random collisions that can occur in a nondeterministic system.""
Link to Original Source
top

Cause of Redbox Price Increase? - Congress

bill_mcgonigle bill_mcgonigle writes  |  about 3 years ago

bill_mcgonigle writes "Following up on the previous story story about the Redbox price increases, Redbox's third-quarter earnings announcement ends the speculation. Redbox explains, "The change is primarily due to the increase in operating expenses, including the recent increase in debit card interchange fees as a result of the Durbin Amendment." The Durbin Amendment creates a 'debit interchange fee floor', which increases costs on small transactions made with debit cards — estimated to be an additional ten cents per Redbox transaction."
Link to Original Source
top

Netflix dumps Qwikster, keeps DVD service on netfl

bill_mcgonigle bill_mcgonigle writes  |  more than 3 years ago

bill_mcgonigle writes "In a sudden fit of sanity, Netflix CEO Reed Hastings has announced that Netflix will not be splitting its DVD service into a separate website.

He writes, "It is clear that for many of our members two websites would make things more difficult, so we are going to keep Netflix as one place to go for streaming and DVDs. This means no change: one website, one account, one password in other words, no Qwikster." He forgot, "one queue, one recommendation engine preference set."

Netflix had previously detailed plans to split its DVD-by-mail business into a separate business, Qwikster."

Link to Original Source
top

Wired Releases Full Manning/Lamo Chat Logs

bill_mcgonigle bill_mcgonigle writes  |  more than 3 years ago

bill_mcgonigle writes "After more than a year, Wired has finally released the (nearly) full chat logs between Adrian Lamo and Bradley Manning. Glen Greenwald provides analysis of what Wired previously left out. Greenwald writes:

Lamo lied to and manipulated Manning by promising him the legal protections of a journalist-source and priest-penitent relationship, and independently assured him that their discussions were "never to be published" and were not "for print." Knowing this, Wired hid from the public this part of their exchange, published the chat in violation of Lamo's clear not-for-publication pledges, allowed Lamo to be quoted repeatedly in the media over the next year as some sort of credible and trustworthy source driving reporting on the Manning case

. Slashdot has previously covered the controversy (here, and here.)"
Link to Original Source

top

Controversy over Zappos Advertising with the TSA

bill_mcgonigle bill_mcgonigle writes  |  more than 3 years ago

bill_mcgonigle writes "A blog post from Amazon's Zappos unit talking about its advertising on TSA collection trays has recently caught the attention of TSA critics and its customers. Zappos writes, "Since the airports that have the sponsored security bins don't have to put the money/time/energy into those efforts anymore, TSA can spend the money hiring/training more agents." Do customers really make a connection between Zappos's advertising and reduced wait times for security screenings, or is this an example of hamfisted marketing to a privacy-conscious online customer base?"
Link to Original Source

Journals

top

Idle Friends Purge

bill_mcgonigle bill_mcgonigle writes  |  more than 4 years ago

I'm removing non-fan friends who haven't posted in two years since I'm at my limit and I use friends to game the scoring system to see more interesting posts.

Any of you who have been discontinued - send me a note if you start posting again and I'd be happy to re-friend you.

top

iPod Shuffle Clone Shown at CeBit

bill_mcgonigle bill_mcgonigle writes  |  more than 9 years ago

An outfit out of Taiwan, Luxpro, has introduced a digital music player, the Super Shuffle, that's a no-tradedress-barred physical clone of the iPod Shuffle. Available in .5 and 1GB models, it lacks AAC but adds WMA, FM Radio, and Voice Recording. Playlist has the story.

top

Atlantic Mega-Tusnami to Hit North America

bill_mcgonigle bill_mcgonigle writes  |  more than 9 years ago Scientists at the Benfield Hazard Research Center have determined that a Mega-tsunami will hit the coast of North America when the Cumbre Vieja Volcano and part of the Island of La Palma in the Canary Islands collapse into the sea. The wave hitting North America will be up to 50 meters (164 feet) high and surge up to 20km (12.4 miles) inland while Brazil will see 40 meter waves with up to 100 meter waves on the West Saharan shore (ILM Rendition). Insurance losses are estimated to be in the multi-trillions, yet the landslide has been completely unmonitored since 1997. The BBC has an FAQ on the Mega-tsunami.

[edit: rejected by Slashdot 2004-12-28 17:22:50]

top

Massive Solar Flare Headed Straight For Earth

bill_mcgonigle bill_mcgonigle writes  |  about 11 years ago

At 1110 UT this morning, the third largest solar flare on record erupted from the Sun, sending a coronal mass ejection directly towards Earth at 5 Million MPH (picture, animation), and starting a solar radiation storm. We may see bright auroral activity tonight. Passengers on high-altitude airplane flights may receive chest-x-ray-level dosages of radiation.

top

You're In A Political Party's Database

bill_mcgonigle bill_mcgonigle writes  |  more than 11 years ago

The Democratic and Republican parties have 158 and 165 Million voters in their databases, "DataMart" and "Voter Vault", respectively. They track how you vote, what issues you're concerned about, demographics about your home and family, and who you associate with. From it they mount door-to-door, telemarketing, spam, and junk mail campaigns offering customized versions of the political party to appeal to your passions, while avoiding issues that might offend you.

top

W32.Blaster linked to Blackout

bill_mcgonigle bill_mcgonigle writes  |  more than 11 years ago The first of the problems that eventually cascaded into the blackout began at 1 p.m on August 14th. "The inability of critical control data to be exchanged quickly across the grid could have hampered the operators' ability to prevent the cascading effect of the blackout," said Gary Seifert, of DOE's Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. "It didn't affect the [control] systems internally, but it most certainly affected the timeliness of the data they were receiving from other networks. A former Bush administration adviser who has consulted with the U.S. Department of Homeland Security on the power grid issue said the Blaster worm also hampered the ability of utilities in the New York region to restore power in a more timely manner because some of those companies were running Windows-based control systems with Port 135 open. The control systems ... are often based on Windows 2000 or XP operating systems and rely on commercial data links, including the Internet and wireless systems, for exchanging information.

Slashdot Login

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?