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Russia May Be Planning National Space Station To Replace ISS

bkmoore Re:What's it good for? (225 comments)

I wish I had mod points. Chemical Rockets are probably almost as good as they're going to get in terms of efficiency, cost and reliability.

2 days ago
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Russia May Be Planning National Space Station To Replace ISS

bkmoore Re:We'll build our own station (225 comments)

...it's just that the murikans can't tell the difference, and they also speak Russian.

Russian speaking murikans?

2 days ago
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Ask Slashdot: Workaday Software For BSD On the Desktop?

bkmoore Re:Easiest way... (264 comments)

Indeed, I'm very much against the idea of owning a mac.

It actually kind of represents the extreme form of what is driving me away from Linux, a focus on usability and mass appeal over flexibility and choice.

Not much of a Linux expert, but enjoy playing with Slackware from time to time. It hasn't changed too much from an "usability" perspective and puts you in the drivers seat.

2 days ago
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Lunar Mission One Proposes To Take Core Sample, Plant Time Capsule On the Moon

bkmoore time capsule idea (69 comments)

The time capsule should contain a magnetic anomaly that once unmooned reveals a black parallelepiped whose sides extend in the precise ratio of 1 : 4 : 9 (1 : 2 : 3).

3 days ago
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Some Virgin Galactic Customers Demand Money Back

bkmoore Re:If the cause of the crash... (165 comments)

...is giving the pilot the full control of the craft (ie, the ability to deploy the tail above rated speed) then they're going to have an interesting balance to strike...

Maybe somebody here knows more about the system architecture of the "feathers" mechanism. From what I've read, the pilot only pulled the lever to unlock the surfaces, but we do not know what caused them to actually deploy. If they were computer controlled, it could be possible that a computer or sensor failure caused them to deploy early.

about three weeks ago
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Space Tourism Isn't Worth Dying For

bkmoore Re:Chuck Yeager called it (594 comments)

He was referring to space tourism, not the Space Shuttle. The interview was on CNN in 2012.

about three weeks ago
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Space Tourism Isn't Worth Dying For

bkmoore Chuck Yeager called it (594 comments)

"...that to me is a bunch of crap trying to shoot guys up into damned space. What they're going to do is they're going to wipe out half a dozen (people) one of these days, and that will be the end of it."

about three weeks ago
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SpaceShipTwo Pilot Named; Branson Vows To 'Move Forward Together'

bkmoore Re:This was bound to happen. (112 comments)

Going into space is a dangerous endeavor. And there was bound to be looses. Hell they'll be MORE as time does by. Probably a LOT more. Either we can (collectively) give up now or learn from the loses and continue on.

I hate these kinds of comments, that pilot went in testing a roller coaster ride for millionaires.

about three weeks ago
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Antares Rocket Explodes On Launch

bkmoore Re:That's the part that "counts" (groan) (443 comments)

...sitting in storage. 40 years is a long time.... Apparently they were not sufficiently re-conditioned before use.

We don't know the cause of the failure yet. Aren't we being a bit premature?

about three weeks ago
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Antares Rocket Explodes On Launch

bkmoore Re:Elon Musk Called it Two Years Ago (443 comments)

Elon Musk called it two years ago ...."The results are pretty crazy. One of our competitors, Orbital Sciences, has a contract to resupply the International Space Station...."

Elon Musk obviously has a personal financial stake in the awarding of that contract.

about three weeks ago
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When Snowden Speaks, Future Lawyers (and Judges) Listen

bkmoore Re:Snowden (221 comments)

....They also moved off from computers to typewriters for some highly sensitive documents. If they already knew all that Snowden stole, why would they do that now? Why not earlier?

There's more than one way of looking at that. 1) by moving to typewriter, they were trying to protect their information from the Americans - your theory. or 2) they saw how easy it is for an insider to electronically copy a library of documents and leave the country. Personally, I think 2) is much more plausible based on that Snowden actually revealed. Secure Russian or Chinese communications would not have been a part of normal internet or telephone traffic that the US was monitoring anyway. Another point is it's actually a minor victory if the Russians and Chinese become so paranoid that they go from efficient digital communications to using mechanical typewriters and sheets of carbon to communicate. But I respect your opinion. Absent of additional information, I think we both have valid points.

about a month ago
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When Snowden Speaks, Future Lawyers (and Judges) Listen

bkmoore Re:Snowden (221 comments)

Russia thinks so. China does too.

Can you be a patriot to more than one country?

I think it's highly probable that both Russia and China already had much of what Snowden took with him on his laptop. If there was any intelligence value for those countries, it would have been to validate their sources. On the other hand, the propaganda value was limited at best. Both countries are not exactly ruled by law and they aggressively suppress dissent. On the one hand, they can use Snowden as an example of American double speak, but OTOH they don't want their own citizens to be getting the same ideas.

about a month ago
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The Largest Ship In the World Is Being Built In Korea

bkmoore Re:Question (275 comments)

If it floats, it will be neutral because it will displace as much water equal to its own mass. If it sinks, it will displace less water than equal to its own mass.

Only the mass of the object matters if it's inside of the hull of the ship. Shipping 1 ton of feathers is the same as shipping 1 ton of led, at least as far as displacement is concerned.

about a month ago
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Apple Doesn't Design For Yesterday

bkmoore Re:I don't follow (370 comments)

So what's so "tomorrow" about change from Lucida to Helvetica, which impedes legibility, requires more screen space, and makes the GUI appear fuzzy? Is that the definition of "tomorrow" now?

Tomorrow, you will be one day older than today. Enough tomorrows and your eyesight will probably fade to the point where text on a computer monitor appears fuzzy. By making the font fuzzy today, Apple is providing their users with a taste of tomorrow. Next, Apple will probably shrink the keyboard to the point that accuracy suffers, as it inevitably does with old age.

about a month ago
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Cisco Exec: Turnover In Engineering No Problem

bkmoore Re:The essence of enterprise (148 comments)

...the very essence of an enterprise (any enterprise) is that it is a bundle of labour and capital whose essential structure and identity is independent of and more persistent than the labour it employs. The identity behind its labour component is no more important than the identity of its capital component...

Mr. Patel was misquoted in the header, FTA he did not explicitly say "Turnover in Engineering No Problem", but let's assume he did say so in so many words. He is about 33% correct, all engineers are replaceable, and that is the main reason good engineers always document their work. But the question that is often ignored by business school 101-types is how much money and time does it take to replace a competent engineer? Can your enterprise afford the Project disruption and late time-to-market? Will your development still be relevant by the time it finally launches?

You argue that "capital" and "labor" are essentially equal to the identity of an enterprise. In a lot of enterprises that may be true, where either the labor is totally unskilled (light-bulb turners) and requires no training, or the labor is "certified and trained" and perform a set of narrowly-defined tasks, e.g. truck drivers, shipping, railroad engineers, airline pilots, etc. In product development, this ideal model breaks down. Engineering has no standardised training, and every situation or development situation is a unique learning experience, both for the enterprise and for the labor. That's why we have "project management" and development in the first place. History is full of examples of enterprises that made the mistake of treating their engineers as fungible, interchangeable assets. Products started coming out "a day late and a dollar short". Eventually they reorganised, split, made a splash with some big announcements and then disappeared.

about a month ago
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Apple Announces iPad Air 2, iPad mini 3, OS X Yosemite and More

bkmoore Re:Yosemite (355 comments)

Yosemite Sam was an angry Hessian.

about a month ago
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Facebook and Apple Now Pay For Female Employees To Freeze Their Eggs

bkmoore Re:So... (253 comments)

As an added bonus, they can start having babies when they're 45!

Having children early and starting a career at the same time can be very rough, but there's a lot to be said for still having a life to look forward to once they're grown and out of the house. Added bonus is you'll probably be around long enough to enjoy grandparenthood and possibly even great-grandparenthood.

about a month ago
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How English Beat German As the Language of Science

bkmoore my rant... (323 comments)

My Herrschaft, German really is such a Biedermeier language and and doesn't fit with the current Zeitgeist. It has a gestalt that is more suited for 19th century expression. After the English-language Blitzkrieg that has taken over most pop culture, any german-language expression is seen as just a lot of flak from a karabiner. I guess we'll have to replace classical german terms such as Herz, Eigen-vector, E-Modul, with a more english ideal; cycles-per-second (so much for brevity). But German is such a beautiful language an sich. I really had my Aha-Erlebnis when I realised that german expressions were no longer associated with übermenschen traveling in U-Boots or flying in Luftwaffe planes. Now the whole world can enjoy rooting for German Wunderkinder on the national team, and at home recreate the best parts playing foosball. Maybe the French feel a bit of Schadenfreude at seeing the significant influence of german Gedanken in the english language. Maybe someday they'll be a putsch and French will take over, but for now, I'm counting on a german-language encore.

about a month ago
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Ask Slashdot: Best Books On the Life and Work of Nikola Tesla?

bkmoore Re:Not a narcisisst (140 comments)

Jobs didn't electrocute animals to show how bad Tesla's AC was.

It's kind of hard to shock an animal with a Pentium II.

about a month ago
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FBI Says It Will Hire No One Who Lies About Illegal Downloading

bkmoore Re:what they do, not should do (580 comments)

I haven't been following this thread too closely, so maybe repeated somewhere else. I think we agree basically on following the law. What I was trying to say is for most people, downloading an occasional mp3 is the moral equivalent to driving 60 in a 55 mph zone. The problem is when the recording industry tries to turn a minor infraction of the law into a federal crime, on par with armed bank robbery. Or wants to treat all minor offenders the same as the few who actually run a warez site.

When I was in high school, my friends and I all built our music collections by dubbing each others cassette tapes. When I joined the military later on, I don't think anybody would have cared that I had a box of dubbed Def Leppard tapes, other than as an indication of poor taste in music.

about a month and a half ago

Submissions

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Space junk may have reached the tipping point

bkmoore bkmoore writes  |  more than 3 years ago

bkmoore (1910118) writes "A NASA report says that the amount of orbital debris and space junk may have reached its tipping point, making low earth orbit collisions with satellites and manned spacecraft more likely. BBC ran an article here.

The total amount of space debris has doubled in the last couple of years because of a Chinese test which destroyed a weather satellite in 2007 and a collision between two satellites in 2009. Space junk is posing an ever increasing risk to using low earth orbit. Does anyone here have any ideas of how to reduce the amount of space junk before we begin to loose GPS coverage, satellite communications, and manned space flight?"

Link to Original Source
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First Thunderbolt Reviews

bkmoore bkmoore writes  |  more than 3 years ago

bkmoore (1910118) writes "Other World Computing has just completed some of their first tests Thunderbolt via target disk mode. Target disk mode basically lets you use a Mac as an external HDD. For the review, they tested a Macbook Pro with an internal 6G SSD in target disk mode connected to a 27" iMac with the official Apple-approved cable. Surprisingly, the benchmark speed was 74 MB/s reads and 49 MB/s writes which is only about 4-6% of the full throughput of the Thunderbolt interface and not much of an improvement over FireWire 800 speeds. This was just one quick test, so more will be needed to get to the bottom of this bottleneck."
Link to Original Source
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Stuxnet Jointly Developed by US and Israelel

bkmoore bkmoore writes  |  more than 3 years ago

bkmoore (1910118) writes "The computer worm Stuxnet was according to this NY Times article jointly developed by US and Israeli intelligence services in order to sapatoge Iran's nuclear weapons programs. According to the NY Times article, which appeared on Saturday, Siemens in Germany unknowingly participated in developing the worm by assisting in developing a program to protect its industrial systems from attack with the US Department of Energy. In doing so, Siemens provided the Department of Energy with information on internal vulnerabilities which could be exploited. According to the article, the worm was tested in Isreal, “To check out the worm, you have to know the machines,” said an American expert on nuclear intelligence. “The reason the worm has been effective is that the Israelis tried it out.”"
Link to Original Source
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Original Apple I up for Auction in London

bkmoore bkmoore writes  |  about 4 years ago

bkmoore (1910118) writes "If you thought Apple hardware was expensive, an Apple-1 is being auctioned by Christie's in London and is expected to go for around $160,000. And no, it doesn't support Adobe Flash. And I thought a MacBook Pro was expensive."
Link to Original Source

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