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Comments

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The Largest Ship In the World Is Being Built In Korea

bkmoore Re:Question (245 comments)

If it floats, it will be neutral because it will displace as much water equal to its own mass. If it sinks, it will displace less water than equal to its own mass.

Only the mass of the object matters if it's inside of the hull of the ship. Shipping 1 ton of feathers is the same as shipping 1 ton of led, at least as far as displacement is concerned.

yesterday
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Apple Doesn't Design For Yesterday

bkmoore Re:I don't follow (358 comments)

So what's so "tomorrow" about change from Lucida to Helvetica, which impedes legibility, requires more screen space, and makes the GUI appear fuzzy? Is that the definition of "tomorrow" now?

Tomorrow, you will be one day older than today. Enough tomorrows and your eyesight will probably fade to the point where text on a computer monitor appears fuzzy. By making the font fuzzy today, Apple is providing their users with a taste of tomorrow. Next, Apple will probably shrink the keyboard to the point that accuracy suffers, as it inevitably does with old age.

yesterday
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Cisco Exec: Turnover In Engineering No Problem

bkmoore Re:The essence of enterprise (145 comments)

...the very essence of an enterprise (any enterprise) is that it is a bundle of labour and capital whose essential structure and identity is independent of and more persistent than the labour it employs. The identity behind its labour component is no more important than the identity of its capital component...

Mr. Patel was misquoted in the header, FTA he did not explicitly say "Turnover in Engineering No Problem", but let's assume he did say so in so many words. He is about 33% correct, all engineers are replaceable, and that is the main reason good engineers always document their work. But the question that is often ignored by business school 101-types is how much money and time does it take to replace a competent engineer? Can your enterprise afford the Project disruption and late time-to-market? Will your development still be relevant by the time it finally launches?

You argue that "capital" and "labor" are essentially equal to the identity of an enterprise. In a lot of enterprises that may be true, where either the labor is totally unskilled (light-bulb turners) and requires no training, or the labor is "certified and trained" and perform a set of narrowly-defined tasks, e.g. truck drivers, shipping, railroad engineers, airline pilots, etc. In product development, this ideal model breaks down. Engineering has no standardised training, and every situation or development situation is a unique learning experience, both for the enterprise and for the labor. That's why we have "project management" and development in the first place. History is full of examples of enterprises that made the mistake of treating their engineers as fungible, interchangeable assets. Products started coming out "a day late and a dollar short". Eventually they reorganised, split, made a splash with some big announcements and then disappeared.

2 days ago
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Apple Announces iPad Air 2, iPad mini 3, OS X Yosemite and More

bkmoore Re:Yosemite (352 comments)

Yosemite Sam was an angry Hessian.

4 days ago
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Facebook and Apple Now Pay For Female Employees To Freeze Their Eggs

bkmoore Re:So... (246 comments)

As an added bonus, they can start having babies when they're 45!

Having children early and starting a career at the same time can be very rough, but there's a lot to be said for still having a life to look forward to once they're grown and out of the house. Added bonus is you'll probably be around long enough to enjoy grandparenthood and possibly even great-grandparenthood.

5 days ago
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How English Beat German As the Language of Science

bkmoore my rant... (323 comments)

My Herrschaft, German really is such a Biedermeier language and and doesn't fit with the current Zeitgeist. It has a gestalt that is more suited for 19th century expression. After the English-language Blitzkrieg that has taken over most pop culture, any german-language expression is seen as just a lot of flak from a karabiner. I guess we'll have to replace classical german terms such as Herz, Eigen-vector, E-Modul, with a more english ideal; cycles-per-second (so much for brevity). But German is such a beautiful language an sich. I really had my Aha-Erlebnis when I realised that german expressions were no longer associated with übermenschen traveling in U-Boots or flying in Luftwaffe planes. Now the whole world can enjoy rooting for German Wunderkinder on the national team, and at home recreate the best parts playing foosball. Maybe the French feel a bit of Schadenfreude at seeing the significant influence of german Gedanken in the english language. Maybe someday they'll be a putsch and French will take over, but for now, I'm counting on a german-language encore.

about a week ago
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Ask Slashdot: Best Books On the Life and Work of Nikola Tesla?

bkmoore Re:Not a narcisisst (140 comments)

Jobs didn't electrocute animals to show how bad Tesla's AC was.

It's kind of hard to shock an animal with a Pentium II.

about a week ago
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FBI Says It Will Hire No One Who Lies About Illegal Downloading

bkmoore Re:what they do, not should do (576 comments)

I haven't been following this thread too closely, so maybe repeated somewhere else. I think we agree basically on following the law. What I was trying to say is for most people, downloading an occasional mp3 is the moral equivalent to driving 60 in a 55 mph zone. The problem is when the recording industry tries to turn a minor infraction of the law into a federal crime, on par with armed bank robbery. Or wants to treat all minor offenders the same as the few who actually run a warez site.

When I was in high school, my friends and I all built our music collections by dubbing each others cassette tapes. When I joined the military later on, I don't think anybody would have cared that I had a box of dubbed Def Leppard tapes, other than as an indication of poor taste in music.

about two weeks ago
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FBI Says It Will Hire No One Who Lies About Illegal Downloading

bkmoore Re:yes, they people who follow the law/ rules (576 comments)

You can drop the "upper middle class" part, as this is about following the law. Full stop. The FBI and especially the intelligence services will tell you that they very much try to hire people who follow the law and other rules.

So they should never hire anyone who has ever driven faster than the legal speed limit? (55 mph in the not-so-olden days) People bend the rules all the time and usually aren't even aware they are until they're caught. That's normal human behavior. There are so many Federal criminal laws, nobody's even sure how many there are. We probably all violate at least one federal law in the course of a normal day.

about two weeks ago
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Why Military Personnel Make the Best IT Pros

bkmoore Re:Some would be well suited. (299 comments)

On the other hand, bad former-military people were cogs in a machine, and don't see past their prescribed task at all.

It all depends. A 23 year-old veteran who did his four years and got out is more of a citizen soldier than a cog in a machine. Most are highly-motivated and trainable. They show up to work on time and do what they are supposed to do. The Cogs tend to be the Colonels and Generals who get out and use their military rolodex to make a living as lobbyists or consultants. You'll find those types at most major defense contractors, but they won't be working in IT.

about two weeks ago
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Is Dolby Atmos a Flop For Home Theater Like 3DTV Was?

bkmoore Re:media cos killed it w/compression+Bitstarvation (197 comments)

... Preferably salvaged from the deck of a wooden sailboat.

For listening to Wagner, it should be salvaged from the deck of the Flying Dutchman. From any other sailing ship, it's just not the same.

about 2 months ago
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Build Your Own Gatling Rubber Band Machine Gun

bkmoore Re:Let the.... (39 comments)

...there was a guy who posted instructions on how to make a working AK-47 out of a shovel....

Beating a plowshare into a sword.

about 3 months ago
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"Magic Helmet" For F-35 Ready For Delivery

bkmoore Re:I'm curious (184 comments)

The F104 wasnt designed for ground attack,...

And that's where most of the mishaps originated, misuse of the F-104 in the ground attack role. The F-104 actually had a good safety record when it was operated as intended: a high-altitude, VFR interceptor. The Italians for example had a good safety record. The Germans, not so much.

about 3 months ago
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"Magic Helmet" For F-35 Ready For Delivery

bkmoore Re:I'm curious (184 comments)

.... It uses less fuel and has more advanced weapons. That is about it.

It's all about the weapons and the sensors to cue those weapons. The airframe is secondary. It just gets the weapons to where they need to be to be launched.

The F-104 had the pilot's eyeballs as the long-range sensor, and a primative gun radar. The weapons were the M61 and AIM-9. The F-35 has an advanced radar system, data-link, probably other sensors we don't know about. Weapons would be the AIM-120, AIM-9, JDAM, and other weapons we probably don't know about. The only debate is those sensors and weapons could have been integrated into a less expensive, more conventional airframe.

about 3 months ago
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Mac OS X Yosemite Beta Opens

bkmoore Re:Would love to give it a whirl... (165 comments)

Maybe they gave everybody the same redemption code. ...!

And the code is 1 - 2 - 3 - 4. Funny, that's the same code on my luggage.

about 3 months ago
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Nearly 25 Years Ago, IBM Helped Save Macintosh

bkmoore Re:PPC macs were awful (236 comments)

PPC Macs were awful because Apple wouldn't stop wasting time doing Photoshop shootouts with Pentuim II PCs.

about 3 months ago
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Nearly 25 Years Ago, IBM Helped Save Macintosh

bkmoore Re:Pairing? (236 comments)

MacOS was horrible, and so was DOS and Windows 3.x....Everyone in the real world was going full steam ahead with Unix (Unix wars started around then).

Nope, UNIX was never a factor on the desktop, even ca. 1991. If you had the $$$ to afford a UNIX workstation, you often also had a DOS/Win PC to get real work done. Mac OS wasn't half bad, especially version 6 and earlier. It was when they tried to tack on all the extra stuff in version 7 that it started to fail under its own weight. I feel old now...at my first job I had on my desk, a Mac running version System 6 and a DEC VAX terminal. I think Clinton had just been sworn in.

An old UNIX joke, "What does work do when it arrives at a work station? The same thing a train does when it arrives at a train station."

about 3 months ago
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Malaysian Passenger Plane Reportedly Shot Down Over Ukraine

bkmoore Re:Ah. (752 comments)

.... but still there is a question how they would identify the plane.

Seeing how it was a civilian airliner, I would suspect that they couldn't and didn't.

about 3 months ago
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The World's Worst Planes: Aircraft Designs That Failed

bkmoore Wrong Tactics, Weapons (209 comments)

The article calls a lot of sound aircraft designs failures because they were employed improperly (wrong tactics) or the weapons they were designed to carry weren't ready by the time the war started. An example, the TBD-1 losses at Midway were the result of attacking Japanese battle ships without fighter escorts and by the outdated torpedoes that couldn't be dropped at high speed without breaking up when hitting the water. The Grumman TBF-1 Avenger was "successful" because by the time it entered service, more modern torpedoes were available and military planners knew that torpedo bombers needed fighter escort.

The parallel in Europe is in 1939, both the British and the Germans tried sending daylight bombers without fighter escort into battle. Every time, they suffered unacceptable losses. The point is in 1939 to 1940, aerial warfare was so new that most military planners did not know how to properly employ their air forces, or what the capabilities and limitations of their aircraft were. At the time, Bomber Generals saw fighter production as competition for resources, i.e. aircraft. The Bomber people at the time believed Stanley Baldwin's quote from 1932, "the bomber will always get through."

about 5 months ago

Submissions

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Space junk may have reached the tipping point

bkmoore bkmoore writes  |  more than 3 years ago

bkmoore (1910118) writes "A NASA report says that the amount of orbital debris and space junk may have reached its tipping point, making low earth orbit collisions with satellites and manned spacecraft more likely. BBC ran an article here.

The total amount of space debris has doubled in the last couple of years because of a Chinese test which destroyed a weather satellite in 2007 and a collision between two satellites in 2009. Space junk is posing an ever increasing risk to using low earth orbit. Does anyone here have any ideas of how to reduce the amount of space junk before we begin to loose GPS coverage, satellite communications, and manned space flight?"

Link to Original Source
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First Thunderbolt Reviews

bkmoore bkmoore writes  |  more than 3 years ago

bkmoore (1910118) writes "Other World Computing has just completed some of their first tests Thunderbolt via target disk mode. Target disk mode basically lets you use a Mac as an external HDD. For the review, they tested a Macbook Pro with an internal 6G SSD in target disk mode connected to a 27" iMac with the official Apple-approved cable. Surprisingly, the benchmark speed was 74 MB/s reads and 49 MB/s writes which is only about 4-6% of the full throughput of the Thunderbolt interface and not much of an improvement over FireWire 800 speeds. This was just one quick test, so more will be needed to get to the bottom of this bottleneck."
Link to Original Source
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Stuxnet Jointly Developed by US and Israelel

bkmoore bkmoore writes  |  more than 3 years ago

bkmoore (1910118) writes "The computer worm Stuxnet was according to this NY Times article jointly developed by US and Israeli intelligence services in order to sapatoge Iran's nuclear weapons programs. According to the NY Times article, which appeared on Saturday, Siemens in Germany unknowingly participated in developing the worm by assisting in developing a program to protect its industrial systems from attack with the US Department of Energy. In doing so, Siemens provided the Department of Energy with information on internal vulnerabilities which could be exploited. According to the article, the worm was tested in Isreal, “To check out the worm, you have to know the machines,” said an American expert on nuclear intelligence. “The reason the worm has been effective is that the Israelis tried it out.”"
Link to Original Source
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Original Apple I up for Auction in London

bkmoore bkmoore writes  |  more than 3 years ago

bkmoore (1910118) writes "If you thought Apple hardware was expensive, an Apple-1 is being auctioned by Christie's in London and is expected to go for around $160,000. And no, it doesn't support Adobe Flash. And I thought a MacBook Pro was expensive."
Link to Original Source

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