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Justice Department: Default Encryption Has Created a 'Zone of Lawlessness'

bkr1_2k Re:By that logic, so has the 4th Amendment (421 comments)

Bah, they don't need that data. They just have to look at posting history on slashdot. Of course [he] is.

2 days ago
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Should Disney Require Its Employees To Be Vaccinated?

bkr1_2k Re:Hospitals require testing (663 comments)

So pretty much every retail job in the country should be required to be vaccinated?

Ideally yes though I realize that is probably unrealistic.

I'm just trying to clarify what level of "general public" interaction requires this vaccination oversight? Who's going to pay for it? The government or the employer?

Most people are vaccinated already when they are children so the vast majority of the cost is already accounted for. The rest of it is probably pretty much the easiest cost/benefit analysis ever. The cost of the vaccines and program administration would almost certainly be hugely outweighed by the reduced health care costs. I imagine it would be pretty straightforward to do this either with public or private money. Most medical insurance already covers getting vaccines. (vaccines are generally very cheap)

If people shouldn't be forced then how do they work, given that 44% of the jobs in the US are in some form of retail, transportation, education, or healthcare and another ~10-15% are "professional and business services" or "government" that include some sort of regular customer interaction, how are they to have jobs and also choose not to be vaccinated?

Since the point is that they should be vaccinated the answer to your question seems self evident. Furthermore those numbers do not add up to 100% and the percent of loonies who don't get vaccinated is in the single digits.

No they don't add up to 100% but it's a huge portion of the working populace and you can't have it both ways. You can't say you want to give people choice and then limit ~60% of the job market from them.

Regarding cost, I was talking about the cost of the oversight. Verification that people do, in fact, have the appropriate vaccinations etc. You can't ensure this without some significant cost associated with the tracking and oversight.

about a week ago
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Should Disney Require Its Employees To Be Vaccinated?

bkr1_2k Re:Hospitals require testing (663 comments)

So pretty much every retail job in the country should be required to be vaccinated? I'm just trying to clarify what level of "general public" interaction requires this vaccination oversight? Who's going to pay for it? The government or the employer?

If people shouldn't be forced then how do they work, given that 44% of the jobs in the US are in some form of retail, transportation, education, or healthcare and another ~10-15% are "professional and business services" or "government" that include some sort of regular customer interaction, how are they to have jobs and also choose not to be vaccinated?

about a week ago
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Should Disney Require Its Employees To Be Vaccinated?

bkr1_2k Re:Yes. (663 comments)

Hiring people actively engaged in breaking federal and state law and putting themselves in a position of incapacitation as a result? I draw the line there. I don't like drug tests but the reality is I dislike hiring people who could potentially screw up my company by 1) bringing illegal substances to my office 2) potentially getting arrested before a big meeting they are crucial to 3) whatever else you might be able to come up with that increases the risk of hiring the drug using person over a non drug user.

That said, I won't provide employers with financial data, nor will I provide anyone that asks information about my personal life outside of work, be it facebook information, linkedin, my hobbies or anything else.

about a week ago
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Fake Engine Noise Is the Auto Industry's Dirty Little Secret

bkr1_2k no thanks (818 comments)

F that. Give me the quietest car possible. I'd much rather listen to my music or my companions speaking to me than the damn engine!

about a week ago
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Facebook Will Let You Flag Content As 'False'

bkr1_2k Re:Not "like Slashdot" (224 comments)

Your definition of "beyond reasonable doubt" and mine are different. the few times I've moderated something overrated it has ALWAYS been because it was at least a majority, if not entirely, incorrect. I agree, there are very few reasons to mod down but incorrect information is definitely one of them.

about a week ago
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Pope Francis: There Are Limits To Freedom of Expression

bkr1_2k Re:how is this any different?? (894 comments)

No one has said it was acceptable. What I said (and what I believe the Pope meant) is that it's not a surprise that when you go out of your way to offend someone, they react badly.

There are any number of instances where you could say so & so should be "turned into a glass crater" because of some real or imagined slight or offense. Obviously no one is condoning the out-of-proportion response to the Charlie Ebdo but let's not act like this is some sort of shock either. It's happened before and the editors of Charlie Ebdo chose to continue the action. I'm not saying I disagree with their choice (I think we should be able to say & print whatever we think as long as it doesn't put people in physical harm - like yelling fire in a crowded theater as the classic example) but let's not try to imply they had no part of this and the action was completely unexpected.

The only real question is whether or not it is reasonable to think that their actions did directly put people in harm. I think not, but clearly someone disagrees with me.

about two weeks ago
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Pope Francis: There Are Limits To Freedom of Expression

bkr1_2k Re:how is this any different?? (894 comments)

What he said was violence is bad and you shouldn't commit violence. But if you deliberately offend someone, you should expect some level of violent response. He implied this is because humans haven't learned very well how not to respond with violence.

Just because violence is bad doesn't mean you should go through life somehow expecting to avoid it and acting insulted when it happens after you've been a douchebag.

about two weeks ago
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Silicon Valley's Quest To Extend Life 'Well Beyond 120'

bkr1_2k Re:Yet another buzzword! (273 comments)

Please read the rest of Genesis. Abraham lived to be 175 supposedly. This came after Genesis 6:3. Hell, Isaac (son of Abraham) was born when Abraham was 100 years old and Sarah (Isaac's mother) was 90 years old (Genesis 17:17). Terah (Abraham's father) was 205 years old (Genesis 11:27–32).

That reference is inconsistent, to say the least.

about two weeks ago
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The Importance of Deleting Old Stuff

bkr1_2k Re:Dear Nazis (177 comments)

What world do you work in where so much goes wrong so often that you've had 15+ occurrences where you had to "check my old email" to keep from being in a bad situation? Wherever it is, I'll stay the hell away.

I keep all my old emails, for the same reason, but I've used them once or twice in nearly 20 years.

about two weeks ago
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Eric Schmidt: To Avoid NSA Spying, Keep Your Data In Google's Services

bkr1_2k Out of the frying pan, into the fire (281 comments)

Seriously?

I trust google with my data even less than I trust the government. It's why I no longer use any of their services. This article is not for anyone with a functional brain, it's for the masses that believe what they're told to believe. I'd also suspect this wasn't something Schmidt said without some "guidance" or "suggestions" from some of his high powered friends in the government.

about a month and a half ago
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AdNauseam Browser Extension Quietly Clicks On Blocked Ads

bkr1_2k Re: Isn't that click fraud? (285 comments)

Some people simply can't afford to pay for their bandwidth usage themselves, though. Think of the communities that used to use BBSes and now have forum sites where they post pictures, videos, and massive amounts of text. The owners, presumably hobbyists (originally), just want to share information, not foot the bill for everyone else who has a similar interest.

Advertising has a place. Personally, I can ignore most non-intrusive ads and they really only bother me if the move around following my cursor, or blocking the real content, which is more a problem with site or particular ad design than advertisements in general. Other people have a lower tolerance.

Make no mistake, though, what you're suggesting is just elitism trying to keep "poor" people from using the internet for its intended purpose, sharing of information. I'm sure that's not your intent but that's the reality of what you just indicated in your post. "If you can't afford it without advertisements, you shouldn't use the internet" is basically what you just said.

about 2 months ago
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Programmer Father Asks: What Gets Little Girls Interested In Science?

bkr1_2k Re:Yeesh (584 comments)

Feel free to post links to these videos. I'd be interested in seeing how these studies defined "girly" things and "boyish" things for newborns. I suspect that will be more telling than the babies' responses. If building are boyish and teddy bears are girlish, I'm going to call bullshit on the whole damn thing.

about 2 months ago
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Programmer Father Asks: What Gets Little Girls Interested In Science?

bkr1_2k role models (584 comments)

Role models will be the deciding factor. Having a mother who programs and a father who programs, especially if you include her in your computer time, will be a major help.

Then again, some people just don't like it. My oldest, 19 now, is incredibly good at math (though she doesn't like it) and science but her focus is on the "softer" side of things. She wants to work with animals, zoology type stuff, so not a complete lack of science but not the hard focus engineering puts on it. At the same time she's grown up fixing cars and building things right alongside of me. She enjoys that but it's not her passion.

In the end, the best thing you can do is expose your kids to a wide option of possibilities and teach them to make their own decisions and that if they don't like something after a few years they can change their mind again and try a different path.

about 2 months ago
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Scientists Optimistic About Getting a Mammoth Genome Complete Enough To Clone

bkr1_2k Re:There are at least three I know of across the U (187 comments)

That wasn't the case with our ferret. She would run all over the place and end up right back at her pen when it was time to sleep (which was most of the time).

Hell house cats are about as tame as they come, right? But cats turn feral after a certain amount of time without a fixed home. Hell I had a cat, since birth, that always ran off at night in Korea but would walk down the street, roof top to roof top, as I walked home from work then sit in the front door waiting for me to come in the house. When we moved to the US, he got one look at "wilderness" and disappeared, to be seen only twice more over the next year. He had clearly turned feral but, from the look of him, was no worse off.

Anecdotal? Sure, but I think we make a lot of assumptions about things that we believe without having any scientific basis to back up our beliefs. I think you'd find, if you dumped a bunch of ferrets in the wild, plenty will find their way home, others will survive just fine in the wild and make new homes, and still others will not survive. Pretty much the way it is in "the real world" already. No matter how much we try, we're not taking the "wild" completely out of any domesticated species as a whole. There will always be individuals that retain their instincts and natural capabilities. Enough to keep the species alive? That probably depends upon the species.

about 2 months ago
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What Happens When Nobody Proofreads an Academic Paper

bkr1_2k Re:Big woop (170 comments)

This is important "news for nerds" because of the fact that this "peer reviewed" article had a such an egregious error in it that should have been easily spotted if, in fact, the paper was ever actually reviewed.

What does this imply for OSS that is "peer reviewed by millions" as we are wont to point out?

about 3 months ago
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Duke: No Mercy For CS 201 Cheaters Who Don't Turn Selves In By Wednesday

bkr1_2k Re:type of assignment (320 comments)

Considering how many employed coders I've met that didn't understand OS commands, shell scripts of any kind, or anything beyond their little realm, I'd say it's pretty common for students not to know how easy it is to tell they cheated.

about 3 months ago
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Duke: No Mercy For CS 201 Cheaters Who Don't Turn Selves In By Wednesday

bkr1_2k Re:yea no - happened in Middle School (320 comments)

And that's the difference. The rest of the world considers collaboration to be normal while, for whatever stupid reason, the US thinks collaboration is cheating. I learned far more from fellow students than I ever did from professors.

I never cheated on a test but I most definitely "cheated" by US standards on homework.

about 3 months ago
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Duke: No Mercy For CS 201 Cheaters Who Don't Turn Selves In By Wednesday

bkr1_2k Re:Or just practicing for an actual job (320 comments)

Isn't that the purpose of code reviews, though? I mean, you can grab a few lines to do a specific function, test it, maybe use as is, maybe improve, then have other people review the code. Or is that not done in the real world any more?

about 3 months ago

Submissions

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How to Recognize a Good Business Person

bkr1_2k bkr1_2k writes  |  about 7 years ago

bkr1_2k (237627) writes "A recent Slashdot article implied there was some way to "know a good programmer". I disagree with the premise of the article, but that's not the point of this article. This article was inspired by a response to one of my comments about how to tell a good business person when you're looking at working for a startup or young company.

First, since I'm writing this primarily for Slashdot, my credentials. In short, my credentials are no better than anyone else's. I have worked primarily for large companies. I am an electrical engineer with a background in linguistics prior to my technical career. I have been a program manager on small programs and a technical lead on some of those as well as working very large projects. I have never been a "hiring supervisor" but I have managed people both in the military and out. I have taken some business courses focusing on starting technology businesses and I have started several small companies, the most recent of which has promise if I can keep my team motivated.

So what does it take to recognize a "good" business person? How can you tell if the management can take that floogelbinder and make it the next iPod? What are some key aspects of management that you can tell during an interview that will give you insight whether or not to take the risk and invest your time and your career in this ragtag group of upstarts?

We've all worked for bad managers. Some of us have been lucky enough to work for good managers. That's the first place to start. What are key elements to good management that you can glean from an interviewer? Obviously you can see true communication skills during an interview, but can you see time management? What about delegation of tasking and authority to evenly distribute the work load? Can you see humility and willingness to accept different approaches for problem solving? Can you see real planning and long-range vision? While these are important aspects for a good working environment, they may not be able to tell you whether or not the management team can parlay ideas into successful products, even if you can determine them during the interview process.

A business plan is crucial to successfully getting a startup from idea to reality and it will have several key aspects that you can find out about with some simple questions. If you can get a hold of the full plan for your reading pleasure, do so. That's unlikely so here are the major things to think about in a business plan and some things that will tell you how much thought has gone into the business side of an idea rather than just the technology side of it.

Company focus- does the company have a cohesive vision to guide them through the turmoil of initial startup? Not all companies have a mission statement, and some don't need them, but they are very helpful for providing a direction when things start to flounder, as they always do. How will management refocus attention and re-motivate employees when the going gets tough?

"Milestones"- where is the company with respect to attaining its final objective? Have they reached certain short-term milestones? What are the near-term milestones they have planned for and how are they going to meet them? What are their long-term milestones? IE do they have a 3 month plan, a 6 month plan, a 1 year plan, a 5 year plan? Milestones are technical as well as fiscal but both should be considered when you find out about this. Consider if they can realistically meet technical/marketing/etc goals with the staff they have (or forecast having.) Are they overstaffed because they feel flush with VC and will therefore overrun budget? Does their apparent size or forecast size match up with your technical opinion of what is required?

Products & Services — what is their product? Is it a single idea, or a family of products with room for growth? Is it a piece of equipment for sale or is it software? If it's hardware, what are their plans for full-rate production? If it's a service, have they planned for a reasonable rate of growth? Have they planned for an explosive rate of growth? What about customer support?

Underlying Technology — is it cutting edge or run of the mill? Is there room for growth in the technology? Is there a big competition from similar technology (who wants to say they were on the betamax team?) If there is competition, how do they plan to win? (Remember, Betamax was a better product from a purely technical perspective, so that's not a good enough answer.) Will it have to integrate with other technologies or will it stand on its own? Do any supporting technologies need to be created to make theirs viable?

Market Analysis — similar to the competition of other technology, what is the competition already in the field for their direct technology. (If you're planning a shipping company you need to consider FedEx and UPS etc.) What is their market? Who is the target demographic they are trying to reach and what are their secondary markets? What are the financial numbers they're considering? Eg is the market $100k per year or $100M? Are they saving someone money or expecting to "create" a new market? (Saving someone money is much more likely to be a successful product.)

Business model — Are they planning product sales, licensing, services, or some hybrid of these? Have they considered the pros and cons of each model? What are the pros and cons as they see them? (How do they compare to your idea of what the pros and cons would be?)

Sales & Business Development Plan — how are they going to market the product? Do they have customers already? Do they have a marketing team in place? What is the time frame they expect to meet for each major marketing goal?

Financing Strategy — are they looking for VC, employee "buy-in", angel investors, a little of everything? Have they met with any of these and what is the status of funding? Can you look at their presentation if it's ready?

Risk — what is the risk they are taking? What are the hurdles they've considered in the realm of finance, competition, and market changes (eg home builders in the USA are not building right now) and do they have a plan for dealing with those?

Timeline — what is the schedule they expect to meet for their major milestones both financial and technical?

There are several other key components to a business plan, but these are the most relevant for someone working at a lower management/employee level in a technical position. The goal is to ascertain whether or not the "business" people have actually thought through the process of creating a business or just thought they had a good idea and it would carry them. If they can answer questions about these subjects competently, odds are you've found a team that has the potential to go all the way. It's not a guarantee, but it's a lot more reassuring than those who can't answer them. One final thing to consider is that if they can't answer them, you asking questions along these lines could point them in the right direction. You can tell them to call you when they've made the appropriate plans, or you can possibly help guide the company and secure yourself a bigger piece of the pie when payday comes.

Most of the business plan information listed above comes from the course Fundamentals of Technology Start-Up Ventures from the University of Maryland at College Park and the associated textbook. I would recommend anyone interested in working for a startup take a similar course or at the very least read some books on business plans and technology start-up ventures. That way you'll have more insight into what it takes to making a business successful, or at least understand what you need to consider."

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