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Hackers Compromise ICANN, Access Zone File Data System

bmo Re:Some people better be out of a job... (110 comments)

Peer Name Resolution.

The problem is that it's patent encumbered, by Mickeysoft, so it's useless.

There is also something called Hierarchical DHT-based name resolution.

Abstract:

Information-centric network (ICN) architectures are an increasingly important approach for the future Internet. Several ICN approaches are based on a flat object ID namespace and require some kind of global name resolution service to translate object IDs into network addresses. Building a world-wide NRS for a flat namespace with 10^1^6 expected IDs is challenging because of requirements such as scalability, low latency, efficient network utilization, and anycast routing that selects the most suitable copies. In this paper, we present a general hierarchical NRS framework for flat ID namespaces. The framework meets those requirements by the following properties: The registration and request forwarding matches the underlying network topology, exploits request locality, supports domain-specific copies of binding entries, can offer constant hop resolution (depending on the chosen underlying forwarding scheme), and provides scoping of publications. Our general NRS framework is flexible and supports different instantiations. These instantiations offer an important trade-off between resolution-domain (i.e. subsystem) autonomy (simplifying deployment) and reduced latency, maintenance overhead, and memory requirements. To evaluate this trade-off and explore the design space, we have designed two specific instantiations of our general NRS framework: MDHT and HSkip. We have performed a theoretical analysis and a simulation-based evaluation of both systems. In addition, we have published an implementation of the MDHT system as open source. Results indicate that an average request latency of (well) below 100ms is achievable in both systems for a global system with 12 million NRS nodes while meeting our other specific requirements. These results imply that a flat namespace can be adopted on a global scale, opening up several design alternatives for information-centric network architectures.

http://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm...

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BMO

2 days ago
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Federal Court Nixes Weeks of Warrantless Video Surveillance

bmo Re:undocumented immigrant (440 comments)

Oh look at the poor persecuted "christian" that is so bent out of shape because his publicly funded school or courthouse doesn't have a monument to the 10 commandments. Paying 5 or 6 figures for a monument, as has happened in the past, is an endorsement.

Look, numbnuts, it's not "your" school or courthouse, it's our school and our courthouse, and "us" includes atheists, hindi, buddhists, jews, etc., as well as christians, or so-called "christians" that have completely forgotten the Sermon on the Mount.

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BMO

3 days ago
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Sony Demands Press Destroy Leaked Documents

bmo Re:DOCUMENTS? (249 comments)

I'll bet they paid off NYS atty general Eliot Spitzer to shame the major ISPs into dropping usenet entirely because of "child porn."

You're right. Sony is shitting itself not because of movies being prematurely released to the 'net, but evidence of criminal wrongdoing.

I'm buying popcorn.

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BMO

4 days ago
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The GPLv2 Goes To Court

bmo Re:Does GPLv2 Grant a Patent license (173 comments)

There was one direct attack at the GPL that might've had teeth had it not occurred in the fetid imagination of a certain Daniel Wallace.

Dan Wallace tried to get the GPL considered invalid because it amounted to price fixing and a Sherman Act violation. He claimed the harm was that the Free and free properties of Linux operating systems locked him out of the market, even though he didn't actually have a product to market.

He was duly struck down hard by a de novo appellate court decision.

That was probably the only "legitimate" attack on the GPL. Any others are, like you said, shooting the plaintiff in his own foot.

http://www.internetcases.com/l...

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BMO

4 days ago
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Waze Causing Anger Among LA Residents

bmo Re:FTFA (593 comments)

>Yeah, but how far can you make it in FUCKING LOS ANGELES

Probably a lot easier since the roads aren't FUCKING CATTLE PATHS THAT GOT PAVED OVER.

Crikes, you're stupid.

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BMO

4 days ago
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Waze Causing Anger Among LA Residents

bmo Re:FTFA (593 comments)

I'm an urban cyclist.

I can make it from Arlington MA to Downtown Boston no problem, down Mass Ave, one of the most traveled roads anywhere.

And I don't feel like it's suicidal at all. Then again I don't bike like a moron and I pay attention to traffic laws. Clipless pedals help a lot.

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BMO

4 days ago
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Waze Causing Anger Among LA Residents

bmo Re:FTFA (593 comments)

It /is/ walkable.

4 miles is 1 hr 20 minutes at normal walking speed.

2 hours by car? No, just no. That kind of time spent in a car going nowhere is just maddening.

Fer crissakes, it's 1 hr 20 minutes from here to Boston's South Station, and I'm in Concord NH and even during rush hour, it's not two hours. And once you're in Boston or Cambridge, you honestly don't need a car.

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BMO

4 days ago
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Waze Causing Anger Among LA Residents

bmo FTFA (593 comments)

FTFA:
Killeen said her four-mile commute to UCLA, where she teaches a public relations class, can take two hours during rush hour.

>4 miles
>Sunny LA

GET A FUCKING BICYCLE!

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BMO

4 days ago
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Blade Runner 2 Script Done, Harrison Ford Says "the Best Ever"

bmo Deckard (297 comments)

Ok, so Ford is going to be Deckard again.

He is quite a bit older now. Since Replicants live short lives, and Deckard is a Replicant, how is this going to be reconciled in the movie?

I don't see how. Not unless we stick Ford into one of Larry Niven's autodocs.

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BMO

about a week ago
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Congress Passes Bill Allowing Warrantless Forfeiture of Private Communications

bmo Re:PRIVATE encryption of everything just became... (379 comments)

This needs to be modded up.

Encryption doesn't need to be "perfect"

It just has to be convenient and ubiquitous enough to make the government do actual work to get your stuff, forcing agencies to spend money from their budgets. It's assymetrical enough to drain those budgets given enough strength.

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BMO

about a week ago
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Fraud Bots Cost Advertisers $6 Billion

bmo Re:Not sure who to cheer for (190 comments)

>If you don't like advertising on you favorite site. Then you better find them a business model where they can keep running (as it isn't free for them) and feed their family's.
>Otherwise just suck it up as the cost of having free access to their data.

Oh hay look, the old "if you don't like ads and block them you're stealing from the mouths of the children" argument.

It would be fine if I could trust the ad networks to not serve up malware, but even my own favorite sites have hosted malware from their ad networks from time to time.

Blocking ads is a much more of a security issue more than a convenience issue.

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BMO

about two weeks ago
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CIA Lied Over Brutal Interrogations

bmo Re:I prefer this memo. (769 comments)

>So why give up a morally superior position to "fight" people who pose almost no threat to anyone outside their own countries?

Money.

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BMO

about two weeks ago
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How the NSA Is Spying On Everyone: More Revelations

bmo Re: 3GPP (148 comments)

1. Learn how to make a goddamned paragraph.
2. Your entire argument is wharrgarbl
3. You've missed the entire point of what I've said.
4. Fuck off.

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BMO

about two weeks ago
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How the NSA Is Spying On Everyone: More Revelations

bmo Re: 3GPP (148 comments)

It matters because without privacy you have no power.

Everyone has a skeleton. Nobody is perfect. This is about archiving everything and using search technology to create instant dossiers on people who have influence on more than a handful of people. In other words, anyone who wants to effect change will be prevented/discredited.

It is a direct attack on democracy itself. It is an attack on the public at large.

Whether it's done by private corporations or the government, the effect is the same. It should be condemned in all cases.

And it's people like you that give this all a pass. You and your ilk disgust me.

Good day, sir.

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BMO

about two weeks ago
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Google Hopes To One Day Replace Gmail With Inbox

bmo Re:This is moderately insane (239 comments)

> I wonder if they'll drop POP support before lowering the boom? I have so very much data in there.

What, exactly, is preventing you from archiving what you have /right now/? What is preventing you from setting your IMAP/POP client to continually store in local folders?

Been using Tbird to access Gmail for years now. I don't see your problem.

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BMO

about two weeks ago
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Ask Slashdot: Non-Coders, Why Aren't You Contributing To Open Source?

bmo Re:Look what those assholes did to gedit. (488 comments)

>> Getting rid of this shit-for-brains UI is the best possible bugfix that gedit could undergo right now. But will it be accepted? Of course not! The hipsters can't possibly be wrong about the UI.

>Substitute 'Firefox' or just about any other open source program in place of 'Gedit' and you have a perfect description of what is wrong with open source today.

Substitute Microsoft Word or just about any other closed source program in place of 'Firefox' and you have a perfect description of what is wrong with closed source today.

Fixed.

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BMO

about three weeks ago
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The EU Has a Plan To Break Up Google

bmo Re:Google doesn't have a monopoly on ANYTHING. (334 comments)

Moreover, if Nokia wasn't run by absolute incompetents, they'd still be a huge player in the smartphone market.

But they farted around with OSes, libraries, and waffled and couldn't decide themselves out of a wet paper bag being while pushed off a cliff. To top it off, the board decided to welcome Microsoft's cukoo-egg into their nest because "OH MY GOD A BILLION DOLLARS."

Google is where it is because a lot of companies are run by boards that are more interested in feathering their own nests instead of what they largely give lip-service to - "innovation"

Look at Yahoo. Go ahead, look at 'em. Point And Laugh. They deserve it.

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BMO

about a month ago
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Firefox Signs Five-Year Deal With Yahoo, Drops Google as Default Search Engine

bmo Re:Market Share in 2019? (400 comments)

while threatening to jump ship to a browser they can't even customize at all.

You can't possibly be talking about Google's browser.

Chromium is properly FOSS.

https://chromium.googlesource....

Chrome itself is closed source, but Google really does an awful lot for the FOSS community.

The browsers you truly can't customize consist of the likes of IE and Opera.

petty little complaints

I've been an open source user/abuser and proponent going on 20 years now. It's stuff like this that make me think that if you're an actual Firefox dev, you need to GTFO right now before your toxic attitude spreads.

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BMO

about a month ago
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Halting Problem Proves That Lethal Robots Cannot Correctly Decide To Kill Humans

bmo Re:I think (335 comments)

Product liability never results in anyone being actually responsible for the death going to jail or huge penalties.

A multinational might> pay out a couple of million in product liability, but then it will just be chalked up to the cost of doing business.

If the multinational is a defense contractor (BAE, Raytheon, Lockheed, General Dynamics, etc), it will all be swept under the rug and more money will be thrown at the contractor to "fix" it.

That's the reality.

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BMO

about 1 month ago

Submissions

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Oak Ridge's Titan Supercomputer Claims Top Spot

bmo bmo writes  |  more than 2 years ago

bmo (77928) writes "MANNHEIM, Germany; BERKELEY, Calif.; and KNOXVILLE, Tenn.—Advanced reports that Oak Ridge National Laboratory was fielding the world’s fastest supercomputer were proven correct when the 40th edition of the twice-yearly TOP500 List of the world’s top supercomputers was released today (Nov. 12, 2012). Titan, a Cray XK7 system installed at Oak Ridge, achieved 17.59 Petaflop/s (quadrillions of calculations per second) on the Linpack benchmark. Titan has 560,640 processors, including 261,632 NVIDIA K20x accelerator cores."
Link to Original Source
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Steve Jobs Steps Down as CEO of Apple

bmo bmo writes  |  more than 3 years ago

bmo writes "PRESS RELEASE: Letter from Steve Jobs

August 24, 2011–To the Apple Board of Directors and the Apple Community:

I have always said if there ever came a day when I could no longer meet my duties and expectations as Apple’s CEO, I would be the first to let you know. Unfortunately, that day has come.

I hereby resign as CEO of Apple. I would like to serve, if the Board sees fit, as Chairman of the Board, director and Apple employee.

As far as my successor goes, I strongly recommend that we execute our succession plan and name Tim Cook as CEO of Apple.

I believe Apple’s brightest and most innovative days are ahead of it. And I look forward to watching and contributing to its success in a new role.

I have made some of the best friends of my life at Apple, and I thank you all for the many years of being able to work alongside you."

Link to Original Source
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Nokia will lay off up to 6,000 next week

bmo bmo writes  |  more than 3 years ago

bmo (77928) writes "TechEye has heard that Nokia is going to fire up to 6,000 people as soon as next week.

An industry source tells us the lay-offs will mainly be in Nokia's home country, Finland.

There will be job cuts all round — but the majority will be in Finland. We have also heard from that all the work from the Symbian group is going to go to Microsoft."

Link to Original Source
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bmo bmo writes  |  more than 8 years ago

bmo (77928) writes "October 09, 2006 (Computerworld) — Ray Noorda, who led Novell Inc. as CEO from 1983 to 1995 and was a leader in the world of computer networking, died today at his home in Orem, Utah. Noorda, 82, was the "Father of Networking" and built Novell up to be one of the largest movers and shakers of the 1990's.

More here and here."

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