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FAA Clears Movie and TV Drones For Takeoff

bobbied Re:Major unanswered questions (50 comments)

thought i made a spelling mistake, but at least Wikipedia agrees with me. Winter does bad things to aircraft. ;-) ice accumulates at the leading edge of wings and props, until the profile is no longer generating lift. That is why most aircraft have heating in the wings leading edge and mechanical deformation to break of the ice.

Actually, usually only larger aircraft have deicing capacity. Most private airplanes have none beyond heat for the airspeed probe.

Commercial aircraft carry it only for convenience because the flying rules state that you cannot fly into known icing conditions without it. They take it along so they can more easily make their schedule and not have to fly around stuff.

Finally, I'd like to point out that there are multiple kinds of deicing setups and what you describe is pretty much how the low end stuff works. Most commercial jets just heat the leading edges using high temperature bleed air from the turbines. The rubber boot thing doesn't work so well at high mach numbers...

5 days ago
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FAA Clears Movie and TV Drones For Takeoff

bobbied Re:I get it (50 comments)

Actually, that's the arguably the biggest problem here. The FAA was directed to develop a policy for commercial drones, and it's initial reaction was to determine, without any sort of rule making process, that drones that followed the model rules were not in fact models, and attempt to prohibit any sort of autonomous flight whatsoever. A couple months back they were even saying that first person view direct remote control under model rules was unacceptable, and still claiming that no rule making was required.

For Commercial operations yes, the FAA has totally banned drones for commercial use (until now)... Hobby use, not so much. Where the FAA technically governs anything from the ground up outside a building, they've never really handed out regulations for individual private hobby flying toys and I doubt they care about them as long as they don't interfere with manned flight operations.

It's the same sort of thing they do for ultralights. Keep the aircraft under a specified weight and out of controlled airspace and you don't need to register the craft, have a pilot's license to fly it or have a license to maintain it. Just stay out of controlled space and they don't say anything. Try to sell rides in your ultralight and voila a whole host of regulations hit you because it's now a commercial operation. Same with Drones. Keep it small, low and for personal use, they won't bat an eye, but start doing commercial things with it and they are going to inspect you every which way and twice on Sunday.

You see, the FAA really only cares about the commercial use of the airspace, which is really their mandate. Yea they govern private aviation too, but only because they use the same facilities as commercial and unless everybody follows the same rules when mixed up, bad things will happen. But you get a private plane outside of controlled airspace and they won't care much about you anymore. Just don't endanger the commercial operations..

5 days ago
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FAA Clears Movie and TV Drones For Takeoff

bobbied Re:Special Permit Only (50 comments)

And let people use drones not in controlled airspaces as they see fit. Really complicated.

Which is what we actually have now with one more restriction. COMMERCIAL use is banned outright. Private Individual Hobby use is already allowed outside of controlled airspace below about 200' AGL as I understand it.

5 days ago
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FAA Clears Movie and TV Drones For Takeoff

bobbied Re:compromising the safety of existing air traffic (50 comments)

So drones are flying at 38,000 feet or circling over international airports now?

Not by individuals or companies. I'm guessing we have government doing this already, if for no other reason than to allow testing.

Surely there is a minimum allowable altitude for any manned aircraft so simply mandate all drone stay below that. There you go FAA, i just saved you millions in lost man hours and other random crap associated with this kind of nonsense. I'll be expecting my cheque any day now.

There are *recommended* limits, how high you should fly over obstructions, how far away you should stay from people etc, but if you are flying VFR over farmland it's pretty much pilot discretion outside of controlled airspace. You will get blamed if you ball it up by hitting a tree and you might even get cited for being reckless, but if you are PIC and you think it's safe, knock yourself out all the way down to the ground.

I suppose you could just declare that Drones under 500' AGL (maybe 200'?) outside of controlled airspace that maintains minimum distances from humans and property are allowed for any reason that's not commercial. Just issue a NOTAM and tell pilots that they are only protected above 500' AGL, problem solved. I think I'd put size and weight limits on these unlicensed drones, but apart from the size and weight limits and commercial operation that's what we have/had until now.

5 days ago
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FAA Clears Movie and TV Drones For Takeoff

bobbied Re:No special privleges (50 comments)

If a company can do it, I can. Its just a person after all.

If a reporter has some right, so do I.

Given tax breaks to movies and the NFL, there is so much free content out there. Govt sponsored = crown copyright = no copyright.

You ALREADY have permission to operate a drone as an individual. RC hobbyists have been doing this for decades. There are places you cannot fly them of course, but flying a drone for hobby use is allowed now and has been allowed for the whole of the FAA's existence.

What's being restricted is COMMERCIAL use, and flying in controlled airspace. We don't have rules and procedures in place to allow us to deal with this safely, which is why commercial use has been prohibited until now. The FAA is actually relaxing the rules for commercial use under conditions similar to private hobby use of drones.

So, actually, being a private individual over a company gives you more rights to fly drones, or it used to before now.

5 days ago
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FAA Clears Movie and TV Drones For Takeoff

bobbied Re:I get it (50 comments)

Keep it under about 200', and away from airports and you are free to move about the country. RC models have been operating under these conditions for a long time. So individuals CAN operate drones NOW as a hobby. What is being limited in COMMERCIAL use of drones, and drones that impact existing air traffic.

5 days ago
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IBM Solar Concentrator Can Produce12kW/day, Clean Water, and AC

bobbied Re:OMG - We're all gonna fry! (268 comments)

You should read the referenced article.... It is awash in stuff like this... "Cubic Gallons", "Cubic liters",

This wasn't written by somebody who knows what they are talking about. Somebody's trying to pull a fast one..

about a week ago
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Apple Allegedly Knew of iCloud Brute-Force Vulnerability Since March

bobbied Re:celebgate (93 comments)

apple really screwed the pooch with celebgate. protecting against brute force attacks is like security 101

Seriously? I think the celebrities where/are stupid.

Who in their right mind takes compromising photos and allow them to be stored on anybody's cloud, while knowing that said pictures would be of great value to the public? Security 101 says, DON'T TAKE THE PICTURES in the first place, but if you insist on doing so, DON'T PUT THEM ON THE INTERNET.

Apple may have messed up by not notifying their customers of hacking attempts, but you are not thinking if you put things of value in anybody's hands for safe keeping up on the net, even if it's Apple. It's a bad idea to give up control of your data if it is sensitive in any way, unless it's well encrypted.

Celebrities where primarily responsible, they where plain stupid to allow such pictures to be taken, much less store them protected by no more than a password. What do they THINK is going to happen? Putting tens of thousands of dollars worth of "personal photos" online protected by a password? Even if Apple had done all due dalliance, you can bet somebody would have eventually found a way.

about a week ago
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Not Just Netflix: Google Challenges Canada's Power To Regulate Online Video

bobbied Re:Broadcast rights (108 comments)

If this is successfully argued, could it then be argued that there is no reason why there are any country restrictions on streaming any sort of media since it isn't "broadcasting"?

Not to mention that it would put Aereo.com back in business...

about a week ago
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Apple Yanks iOS 8 Update

bobbied Re:Steve Jobs (203 comments)

As sad as it sounds, I think you are right. Steve was apparently an SOB to work for, making demands and taking no excuses for failure, but that's what it takes to stay on top with technology. I'm thinking that they are falling into the corporate "manage to quarter" mindset. They are just running in the same well worn rut now and will follow Steve into the grave...

Question is who will replace them.

about a week ago
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Friendly Reminder: Do Not Place Your iPhone In a Microwave

bobbied Re:You're doing it wrong... (240 comments)

Now, where did I put my tinfoil hat?

You left it in the microwave after your last tanning session..

about a week ago
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Friendly Reminder: Do Not Place Your iPhone In a Microwave

bobbied Re:Also... (240 comments)

Don't put an unopened bottle or can of soda in a microwave. Or at least not in a microwave you ever want to use again.

Also, don't put your phone in gas oven, or on a hot griddle.

Similarly, don't touch anything hot enough to cook, and don't stick a knife into your gut.

You forgot: Never play Russian Roulette with an automatic....

about a week ago
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Apple's "Warrant Canary" Has Died

bobbied Re:There is no "almost impossible" (236 comments)

>Encryption is ALWAYS breakable by brute force. ...with the exception One Time Pad encryption.

Granted.... AND it's a TOTALLY unusable technique in most cases... It's REALLY HARD to do in the real world which is why I didn't put in an exception to my statement.

about two weeks ago
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Apple's "Warrant Canary" Has Died

bobbied Re:There is no "almost impossible" (236 comments)

Ok.. One time pads... So you going to remember that to unlock your phone?

Practical encryption is ALWAYS crackable. (OTP usually CAN be hacked by attacking the pad generation and distribution process, but if you do that right, not crackable. It's just that it is REALLY hard to do it right.)

about two weeks ago
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Apple's "Warrant Canary" Has Died

bobbied Re:There is no "almost impossible" (236 comments)

Actually, it is not. In reality, a 256 bit key can not be brute forced because of physics - especially the second law of thermodynamics. One of the results of this law is that information needs energy to be represented. In an ideal computer, the representation of one bit requires kT energy, where k is the Boltzman constant and T is the temperature. Let's assume we can operate at the average temperature of 3.2 Kelvin, the average temperature of the universe. The required energy to represent a bit in this case would be around 4.416*10-23 Joule. The annual amount of energy that our sun emits is about 1.21*10^34 Joule. Dividing this with the per bit-change energy, we could provide power for our ideal computer to perform 2.74*10^56 bit changes. This is just about enough to have a 187-bit counter go through all its states. This does not include the energy needed for the computations to test each key (our counter state in this case) for correctness. A 256 bit counter would require ~400.000.000.000.000.000.000 stars like our sun just to represent in the counter of our ideal computer. Or, to say it in the words of Bruce Schneier: "...brute force attacks against 256-bit keys will be infeasible until computers are built from something other than matter and occupy something other than space". Note: I am not talking about potential attacks against the algorithms here, etc. only pointing out that encryption is definitely not ALWAYS breakable by brute force.

I have no clue what all the above really means.... If you are saying that 256 bit keys are hard to break, I would concur. If you are saying that it would take a long time, I would again agree. However, if you look at "possible" it is totally possible to brute force a 256 bit key, it just takes TIME to do, LOTS of time OR lots of computers. Either way, it is perfectly possible... Now it may take a LOT of computers (more than are physically possible) or it may take a LONG time (more than we likely have before the sun destroys the earth) but that is all about being practical and not about being possible.

about two weeks ago
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Apple's "Warrant Canary" Has Died

bobbied Re:There is no "almost impossible" (236 comments)

Encryption is ALWAYS breakable by brute force. Question is how long does it take? Seconds? Hours? Months? Years? Decades? This is usually determined by key sizes. The longer the key, the longer it takes to brute force. (generally)

Um, not quite, one time pads are provably impossible to break by brute force since the message can be decoded into any message of the right length.

One Time Pads are incredibly difficult to implement because you have to securely distribute the pads AND you have to make sure your pads are indeed random. So, for use on any kind of digital device, nobody can usually afford to use a One Time Pad for encrypting their phone.

I had assumed that the context ruled out the One Use Pad, so I didn't put an exception in for that. Sorry.

about two weeks ago
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Apple's "Warrant Canary" Has Died

bobbied Re:There is no "almost impossible" (236 comments)

It either can or can't be done. Almost impossible means it still can be done.

Encryption is ALWAYS breakable by brute force. Question is how long does it take? Seconds? Hours? Months? Years? Decades? This is usually determined by key sizes. The longer the key, the longer it takes to brute force. (generally)

about two weeks ago
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Oracle CEO Larry Ellison Steps Down

bobbied Re:Oracle bought Sun who owned MySQL. (142 comments)

I suppose if you don't want to feed his ego... But if you just don't want to fatten Oracle's wallet, MySQL is good in the GPL form...

about two weeks ago
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Next Android To Enable Local Encryption By Default Too, Says Google

bobbied Re:Don't use a google account with Android. (126 comments)

So, riddle me this batman... If you store the key on the device and read it automatically on boot, how's that protect you? Or are you saying that it's on an external device so I now have to keep the "key" around to boot my phone? One offers zero protection, the other consumers will hate.

See this is what usually happens...The consumer doesn't want two devices to manage, they want one. We implement strong encryption using long keys, then we store these keys someplace "on the device" and protect them with a 4 digit pin. Consumers demand it. So we've really reduced the protection level of all that nifty encryption to that of a 4 digit encryption key.

Sort of like what happened to WEP.... It used good encryption (in fact we STILL use the same encryption for the most part) it just bungled the key management side of things to make it useable by consumers. (OK, they did some other stuff wrong too, but the problem was key management..)

So, I'm not saying that having a "boot key" device, simiar to an RSA token isn't a bad idea, I'm saying that most users won't stand for having something separate from their phone that they need to power it on, nor will they suffer though entering sufficiently long and complex passwords.

about two weeks ago

Submissions

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Former NSA Chief says "Isis are using Snowden leaks to evade intellegence"

bobbied bobbied writes  |  about three weeks ago

bobbied (2522392) writes "Former NSA Deputy Chief Chris Ingles claims that the information that Snowden leaked is being used by ISIS to evade intelligence gathering by the NSA. He also said "militants in Iraq and Syria are 'clearly' harder to track down since the rogue agent made freely available a wealth of top-secret information about how the U.S. government hunts its enemies online."

The Ex NSA Deputy Chief is claiming that what was leaked by Snowden goes way beyond what was necessary to expose Snowden's privacy concerns and has severely damaged the NSA's ability to collect intelligence by exposing their methods so they can be evaded."

Link to Original Source
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NASA to perform reformat of Mars Rover Opportunity flash storage

bobbied bobbied writes  |  about a month ago

bobbied (2522392) writes "After a ten years of survival on the Martian surface, Opportunity continues to show that it is getting older. Recently the computer has been resetting itself more and more often. Controllers believe that the flash memory where the rover stores it's variable instructions has a number of bad cells which have simply worn out and stopped working. Doing a reformat operation will find these cells and remove them from use, hopefully eliminating the problematic reboots.

So, "Have you tried to re flash the firmware and power cycle it?" really IS rocket science."

Link to Original Source
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Edward Snowden is not alone!

bobbied bobbied writes  |  about 2 months ago

bobbied (2522392) writes "Apparently Edward Snowden is not alone. CNN is reporting http://www.cnn.com/2014/08/05/... that recent leaked documents published by "the Intercept" (a website that has been publishing Snowden's leaked documents) could not have been leaked by Snowden because they didn't exist prior to his fleeing the USA and he couldn't possibly have accessed them. Authorities are said to be looking for a new leaker."
Link to Original Source
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Earthquake warning issued for central Oklahoma

bobbied bobbied writes  |  about 5 months ago

bobbied (2522392) writes "A rare warning has been issued by the US Geological survey today, warning of an increased risk of a damaging earthquake (magnitude 5.0 or greater) in central Oklahoma. There have been more earthquakes in Oklahoma (per mile) than California this year, prompting the USGS to issue their warning today (May 5, 2014).

This warning is the FIRST such warning to be issued for a state east of the Rockies."

Link to Original Source
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DHS destroyed computers, keyboards, mice over malware

bobbied bobbied writes  |  about a year ago

bobbied (2522392) writes "Irrational fear and lack of understanding leads to the destruction of HHS computing equipment which had been possibly infected with malware. "The agency spent $1.06 million on “building a temporary infrastructure, pending long-term IT solution;” $823,000 on hiring the cybersecurity contractor; $688,000 on “contractor assistance for a long-term recovery solution;" and $4,300 to destroy $170,000 worth of tech equipment." They destroyed computers, TVs, keyboards, mice, printers and cameras to rid themselves of dreaded malware. Seems it worked.

In true government fashion, seems they just spent a boat load of taxpayer money on nothing. Next time just reload the operating system if push comes to shove (or you simply have to be 100% sure it is gone).

Which one of you slashdot readers cashed that $823,000 check? Well done sir or madam.. Well done!

http://www.foxnews.com/politics/2013/07/10/us-agency-destroys-computers/"

Link to Original Source

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