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Comments

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Ask Slashdot: Smarter Disk Space Monitoring In the Age of Cheap Storage?

bobbied Re:I delete things when I'm done using them (170 comments)

I'll bet that's not true...

Seems to me that the stuff I work on keeps getting bigger and bigger, as does my collection of digital pictures and videos. Where I attempt to pare down what I keep, some of it stays around...

I expect that most users do the same things and thus data keeps piling up. I don't think it matters how well you are at deleting stuff you don't need anymore.

2 days ago
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Cisco Fixes Three-Year-Old Telnet Flaw In Security Appliances

bobbied Re:Three years???? (60 comments)

How does a major vendor like Cisco take 3+ years to fix a known security hole?

Work around existed, nobody ever fielded in a configuration that was subject to the problem, so this was LOW risk. If you are working more important issues, LOW risk stuff gets to wait.

That's how.

2 days ago
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Cisco Fixes Three-Year-Old Telnet Flaw In Security Appliances

bobbied Re:I'd worry anyway. (60 comments)

Then too, it may be that Cisco's development lab is really just there to run test software loads. I imagine that they are using TFTP and TELNET for this purpose. Oh the horror! (sarcasm off)

Where I don't disagree with you, I'm not ready to dump on somebody who chooses to use TELNET for what ever reason. IF they understand the risks and knowingly choose to do it anyway, it's their equipment and their call. You and I might never choose to do it this way, but neither of us are involved so it's not our choice.

2 days ago
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Cisco Fixes Three-Year-Old Telnet Flaw In Security Appliances

bobbied Re:The funny about Cisco... (60 comments)

Don't misunderstand me, I'm not advocating TELNET. I'm just not ready to condemn someone for using it for legacy reasons in situations where security is not a huge concern.

Security is really "risk management". This means that you must weigh the implementation costs and consider the risks. Remember that the ONLY secure system is one that's powered off and not plugged in. And then, it's only as secure as the physical security makes it.

In a closed network, like in a development lab, I can imagine that there isn't much risk and running SSH may not be worth bucking the legacy. Who really cares? They are likely using TFTP to load test software images and test configurations anyway, TELNET is the least of their worries if they have a network security concern.

Of course YOUR situation is likely different, as is your assessment of risks and mitigation. Where I would recommend using SSH under almost all situations too, I'm not gong to dump on somebody who chooses to take the risk of using TELNET, especially if they really understand the risks as I'm SURE Cisco does. They decided that TELNET fits their costs/risks assessments, and it's their call.

2 days ago
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Cisco Fixes Three-Year-Old Telnet Flaw In Security Appliances

bobbied Re:The funny about Cisco... (60 comments)

TELNET is just the default way to access the equipment. It comes out of the box that way (OK, not really but it's the default way to set up). Think of it as a legacy thing.

There is nothing wrong with using TELNET on a private network but today we understand that security is better served using SSH for this functionality. However, in some environments, legacy dies hard because TELNET is not really that much of a security risk if you have good control over who accesses your network.

Sharing passwords and logins may seem to be a problem too, but again, there can be times when the costs of managing all the necessary accounts out weighs the risks. If you have positive controls on who accesses your network, that may be enough, for you.

Of course, the level of acceptable risk can vary between applications and companies. For your network, what Cisco does in their lab may be totally inadequate on many levels, or it may be overkill having to remember the "cisco" user password. It all depends on what risk is acceptable and what isn't to you.

2 days ago
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Cisco Fixes Three-Year-Old Telnet Flaw In Security Appliances

bobbied Re:Security + Telnet (60 comments)

Security + Telnet = My Brain Hurts

It should hurt..

However, if memory serves, I think that Cisco provides SSH access and allows you to disable telnet. Even then, suggested practice was to put all your network hardware consoles on a private VLAN and firewall it from general access... So it's understandable that it took some time to fix this given there are multiple work arounds.

2 days ago
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Torvalds: I Made Community-Building Mistakes With Linux

bobbied Re:So How long has it taken you to realize this? (387 comments)

IMHO... Your opinion is still wrong and your argument inappropriate as it doesn't address the issue at hand..

You sir are nit picking

That I take personal offense to.

My apologies. I was not intending to offend you by incorrectly imposing a specific sexual identity on you. Please OMIT the word "sir" from my previous post. However, you are increasingly nit picking on non relevant issues, which IMHO says to me that this debate is pointless as you insist on beating around unrelated bushes...

Until next time.....

5 days ago
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Torvalds: I Made Community-Building Mistakes With Linux

bobbied Re:So How long has it taken you to realize this? (387 comments)

You still haven't presented a valid argument, you are just arguing I don't know what I'm talking about because of some minor wording issue. I already knew some people get paid, some people don't, and said so. You think I should have said "MOST" when I said "FEW" and because of that difference I don't have any creditability here?

You sir are nit picking, while not addressing your real objection. What's that argument technique called? Oh yes.. A red herring fallacy, ad Hominem argument known as Poisoning the well – where adverse information about a target is presented with the intention of discrediting everything that the target person says.

You have a good weekend, and I'm done with this thread.

about a week ago
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Torvalds: I Made Community-Building Mistakes With Linux

bobbied Re:So How long has it taken you to realize this? (387 comments)

Shesh.. Really? Yes, I knew Torvalds gets paid and other developers are paid to contribute... .

Perhaps there would be more volunteers who are not paid by others if Torvalds would knock off his management rough edges?

I think my point still stands..

about a week ago
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Torvalds: I Made Community-Building Mistakes With Linux

bobbied Re:So How long has it taken you to realize this? (387 comments)

I think you have captured my feelings on this fairly well. I'm certainly NOT trying to say Torvalds has totally messed things up or even that I think I could have done better. But I am saying that his management style is sometimes too abrasive and often way too public. I think this has had a chilling effect on the pool of prospective contributors and has contributed to a less than optimal culture on the kernel project and you point to some examples of this. His projects have likely suffered from this. Not that the Kernel isn't successful, only that the project could be managed better.

I'm hoping that Torvalds' admission of this "biggest" mistake can lead to improvement in his style and the culture of the projects he manages, for the betterment of the projects in question...

about a week ago
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Torvalds: I Made Community-Building Mistakes With Linux

bobbied Re:So How long has it taken you to realize this? (387 comments)

That assumes that I'm as good as Linus technically and all other things are equal. Neither of these assumptions are likely true. He already has the name recondition, I would have none. He has the technical experience with the kernel, mine is limited. So your test isn't exactly apples to apples.

So what you're saying is "I don't think he's doing it the right way but I can't do better." How does that add ANYTHING helpful to the debate?

OK, I'll bite.

As a bit of background, I've worked in the software industry for nearly 25 years. I've been involved in many development projects, some successful, some failures. I've worked with and for a lot of different people. I've observed what works well, what works, and what doesn't, and I've taken note of why the projects I've worked on either failed or succeeded. What management styles are most effective and succeed more often and what styles to avoid. What makes a team more effective and what destroys otherwise good teams.

From this experience, I can tell you that certain management styles are generally more successful. Such styles build collaboration and cooperation between team members, which leads to the team being more productive. Management (which Torvalds is in this case) does more than just guide the technical solution, they also set the tone for the team, they manage the culture of the project. How they treat team members has a great impact on the productivity of the team and the productivity of the team can be more important than the technical solution on determining the level of success of a team.

In "free" development projects, developers are really donating their time (usually). For example, few kernel developers get paid for their efforts. Who would want to donate their time and risk being publicly reprimanded? I suppose there are a few, but the universe of prospective team members gets smaller and thus the active contributors in your project is more limited. It's simple to understand why.

Also, one more time, just in case you missed it... I am not claiming to be *technically* as qualified as Torvalds. Now I've never seen a C or C++ program that I couldn't figure out given enough time, so the Kernel code is not beyond my capabilities, but I fully understand that Torvalds has decades experience with this project, it's why he's the leader. (Well that and he holds the trademark..) So do NOT misunderstand me. I am not saying I would or could be better than Torvalds or that I would want to take his job because I could do it better. What I'm saying is that Torvalds could be doing better.

So, in a way, I'm agreeing with Torvalds, his biggest mistake is how he treats his team. And I'm asking him how he intends to do better. Because I think (and my experience tells me) that this mistake has harmed his projects by producing a less than optimal culture on his teams which leads to less than ideal performance. PLUS it has discouraged many from even trying to help given his projected public persona.

about a week ago
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Torvalds: I Made Community-Building Mistakes With Linux

bobbied Re:So How long has it taken you to realize this? (387 comments)

Linus has routinely p!$$ed off his free help and discouraged many perspective people from helping him in the process... The Linux Kernel project has suffered as a result

There's no way to prove or disprove that kernel development to date has suffered as a result. If you want, you can certainly test your thesis by forking the kernel and inviting people to contribute to project with a "nicer, politer, more human-centric development process." If your theories are correct, you should be able to advance at a faster pace than mainline.

That assumes that I'm as good as Linus technically and all other things are equal. Neither of these assumptions are likely true. He already has the name recondition, I would have none. He has the technical experience with the kernel, mine is limited. So your test isn't exactly apples to apples.

But I think it's clear, there has been a lot of people who simply didn't want the drama of working with him and I'm betting that over the decades some of these people could have been valuable to the project. Seems obvious to me, but you are free to be wrong about it..

about two weeks ago
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White House Wants Ideas For "Bootstrapping a Solar System Civilization"

bobbied You want an idea? How about we fund NASA? (351 comments)

You want to encourage exploration/exploitation of space? Fund NASA and point them in the desired direction..

Fully fund a manned mission to Mars and set a 10 year goal. Dig up a pile of past interplanetary missions and let's start funding them too. Saturn and Jupiter all have possibilities that we need to go look at. How about making a survey of near earth asteroids? What are they made of, is there something there we can use, refine or utilize so we don't have to get it all off the surface of the earth and into orbit? NASA has already suggested all these things and more.

Why are you asking the public for ideas, just FUND NASA and let NASA collect ideas and run with the good ones. All they need is the money....

about two weeks ago
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Internet Companies Want Wireless Net Neutrality Too

bobbied Oxi-moron this is... (38 comments)

Net neutrality is not what the name implies, at least not to the end user. How one can come up with a set of rules that are "neutral" to all users and providers is going to look like the IPv6 equivalent of a rube Goldberg machine, or it's going to be very disruptive to the internet in the USA.

You can mandate "equal packet routing treatment", but that doesn't mean a network operator has to keep the links between the source and destination from being saturated (as in the Netflix/Verizon dispute). You can mandate bandwidth between the source and destination but that will require significant costs for providers and preclude a lot of traffic management techniques from being used. You need QoS on that VOIP call? Tough, we have net neutrality!

Then there is the real problem with keeping regulations relevant to the technology they are supposed to control. Who knows what the state of the art will really be in 5 or 10 years? How will IPv6 change how the internet works? What will IPv6 do to routing and a whole host of network technologies? Nobody really knows and that makes it really hard to write effective regulations which do what we need today, next week, next decade and on..

I don't see the government being able to thread the needle here and come up with regulations that are not going to stifle technology development, really free up competition on the internet, and not be woefully out of date in 5 years... If they do, it won't be easy to understand what the rules actually mean. Complexity is never a good thing.

about two weeks ago
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Torvalds: I Made Community-Building Mistakes With Linux

bobbied Re:Bitch-ass whiners got their feelings hurt (387 comments)

Would Apple be where it is if Jobs wasn't an asshole?

I'd like to point out that Jobs wasn't just that... He also paid *really* well for success from the people that worked directly for him. As long as you stayed on his good side anyway...

about two weeks ago
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Torvalds: I Made Community-Building Mistakes With Linux

bobbied So How long has it taken you to realize this? (387 comments)

As all ways, the technical wiz kid finds out after decades of work that the thing that really counts is being an effective leader... And being effective means more than just knowing what the correct technical solution is, but inspiring other people to help you realize your goals. Linus has routinely p!$$ed off his free help and discouraged many perspective people from helping him in the process... The Linux Kernel project has suffered as a result. Who needs that kind of treatment? Not me... (not that I think I'd be that much help.)

So, Mr. Torvalds, with this realization are you planning to at least try to modify your approach, even a little? It can only help you in the long run because the Kernel is bigger than any one person (So is git btw). Stop being abrasive when it's not necessary. We all know you are in charge and you don't have to be abrupt to keep your position.

about two weeks ago
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How English Beat German As the Language of Science

bobbied Re:German illegal? (323 comments)

It's not overturned? Perhaps, but I dare say it would not be possible to do this today. You don't put US citizens in confinement without good reason, and certainly not in large numbers because of their race. I think there has been a bit of change in the law in that regard...

about two weeks ago
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How English Beat German As the Language of Science

bobbied Re:German illegal? (323 comments)

Given the ownership of the land in question was and is arguable, I think you overstate your case. The Mexicans fired on US troops who where occupying land that Mexico understood the US had annexed when they admitted the Republic of Texas into the union. They knew full well that a war could be the result of this action, but they did it anyway. They then lost the SECOND attempt to retain this land by force, this time to the USA...

BUT, the real clincher is the sale of additional lands to the USA. Had Mexico felt it had a claim to the lands taken previously, why on earth did they sell *more* land to the USA? I think that clearly establishes that Mexico had dropped all claims to the lands to the north of the purchased land and wanted to establish a well defined border with the USA which stands to this day.

about two weeks ago
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How English Beat German As the Language of Science

bobbied Re:German illegal? (323 comments)

Texas claimed all the way to the Rio Grande was theirs. Santa Ana singed a treaty to that effect after he was captured. Mexican forces where to with draw past the Rio Grande. Mexico objected, but Santa Ana did sign the Treaties of Velasco to make peace with Texas. Mexico was defeated by the Texans and lost the territory in the rebellion.

The annex of the Republic of Texas included the territory all the way to the Rio Grande. The USA adopted this view, Mexico objected. So Mexico then, full knowing it could start a war, fired on US troops in the territory in question. Which is what I said. They fired the first shots. Then they succeeded in loosing their third war in about a decade.

Yea, the Mexican view is different.. But the subsequent sale of additional lands to the US pretty much settles the question of where the border is. Seems to me the sale pretty much shows the Mexicans admitting that they had no further claim to the land to the north.

about two weeks ago
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Technology Heats Up the Adultery Arms Race

bobbied Re:Can We Get This for Kids? (304 comments)

Having the "right" does not mean I always monitor. My point was that as a parent I have the responsibility, thus I have the right to monitor my kids as I see fit. But I don't always believe that it's necessary, even for minor children. If they are responsible (like my oldest) you don't need to monitor anything, but if they are prone to be irresponsible (like my youngest), constant monitoring is absolutely necessary.

I wonder though, what you might suggest for a child that refuses to be responsible? Do you think it will go better for them if the parent just slowly goes hands off regardless of the child's maturity level? Just throwing up your hands and giving up is a recipe for disaster too. As in all things, there is a happy medium in all this, with the understanding that every kid is different.

So, if there is a child who refuses to be responsible and refuses to mature into an adult (i.e. grow up) even when they come of age, then there comes a time when you have to use the boot and evict them from your home. In that case, things will likely go very wrong, but likely as not it went very wrong decades ago. I've know kids that simply needed to realize the world was hard work and became responsible adults. I've also known a few that self destructed. Again, everybody is different.

about two weeks ago

Submissions

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Former NSA Chief says "Isis are using Snowden leaks to evade intellegence"

bobbied bobbied writes  |  about 1 month ago

bobbied (2522392) writes "Former NSA Deputy Chief Chris Ingles claims that the information that Snowden leaked is being used by ISIS to evade intelligence gathering by the NSA. He also said "militants in Iraq and Syria are 'clearly' harder to track down since the rogue agent made freely available a wealth of top-secret information about how the U.S. government hunts its enemies online."

The Ex NSA Deputy Chief is claiming that what was leaked by Snowden goes way beyond what was necessary to expose Snowden's privacy concerns and has severely damaged the NSA's ability to collect intelligence by exposing their methods so they can be evaded."

Link to Original Source
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NASA to perform reformat of Mars Rover Opportunity flash storage

bobbied bobbied writes  |  about 2 months ago

bobbied (2522392) writes "After a ten years of survival on the Martian surface, Opportunity continues to show that it is getting older. Recently the computer has been resetting itself more and more often. Controllers believe that the flash memory where the rover stores it's variable instructions has a number of bad cells which have simply worn out and stopped working. Doing a reformat operation will find these cells and remove them from use, hopefully eliminating the problematic reboots.

So, "Have you tried to re flash the firmware and power cycle it?" really IS rocket science."

Link to Original Source
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Edward Snowden is not alone!

bobbied bobbied writes  |  about 3 months ago

bobbied (2522392) writes "Apparently Edward Snowden is not alone. CNN is reporting http://www.cnn.com/2014/08/05/... that recent leaked documents published by "the Intercept" (a website that has been publishing Snowden's leaked documents) could not have been leaked by Snowden because they didn't exist prior to his fleeing the USA and he couldn't possibly have accessed them. Authorities are said to be looking for a new leaker."
Link to Original Source
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Earthquake warning issued for central Oklahoma

bobbied bobbied writes  |  about 6 months ago

bobbied (2522392) writes "A rare warning has been issued by the US Geological survey today, warning of an increased risk of a damaging earthquake (magnitude 5.0 or greater) in central Oklahoma. There have been more earthquakes in Oklahoma (per mile) than California this year, prompting the USGS to issue their warning today (May 5, 2014).

This warning is the FIRST such warning to be issued for a state east of the Rockies."

Link to Original Source
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DHS destroyed computers, keyboards, mice over malware

bobbied bobbied writes  |  about a year ago

bobbied (2522392) writes "Irrational fear and lack of understanding leads to the destruction of HHS computing equipment which had been possibly infected with malware. "The agency spent $1.06 million on “building a temporary infrastructure, pending long-term IT solution;” $823,000 on hiring the cybersecurity contractor; $688,000 on “contractor assistance for a long-term recovery solution;" and $4,300 to destroy $170,000 worth of tech equipment." They destroyed computers, TVs, keyboards, mice, printers and cameras to rid themselves of dreaded malware. Seems it worked.

In true government fashion, seems they just spent a boat load of taxpayer money on nothing. Next time just reload the operating system if push comes to shove (or you simply have to be 100% sure it is gone).

Which one of you slashdot readers cashed that $823,000 check? Well done sir or madam.. Well done!

http://www.foxnews.com/politics/2013/07/10/us-agency-destroys-computers/"

Link to Original Source

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