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Comments

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ICE License-Plate Tracking Plan Withdrawn Amid Outcry About Privacy

bonehead Re: Driving is a privelege, not a right. (152 comments)

As if anyone gives a fuck where you drive.

That's far too simplistic a way to look at it.

The problem isn't anyone wanting to know where people drive. The problem is what happens when you combine this database with a few others, and the analytics that are possible.

Do some research. The level of detail of a persons life that they can identify from these "harmlessly tiny bits of information" is staggering.

about 1 month ago
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Why Is US Broadband So Slow?

bonehead Re:it's not that slow (513 comments)

And No, your VOIP should not have QOS priority over my downloading a debian DVD.

Of course it should. VOIP is time sensitive, your iso download is not. There is a debate to be had over whether that QOS should come with an extra charge, but it should absolutely be an option. And VOIP is pretty low bandwidth, giving it priority over your download is probably going to make the difference between getting your iso in 10 minutes 53 seconds VS. 10 minutes 57 seconds.... Not really enough for anyone to throw a fit over....

The real problem is last-mile providers being monopoly providers, therefore so stingy in making prudent upgrades to the infrastructure that everything is constantly pushed so close to the limits that stuff like this start to make a noticeable difference. On an intelligently designed and provisioned network, time-sensitive traffic could be given all the QOS priority it needs without you every noticing a difference.

about 2 months ago
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Why Is US Broadband So Slow?

bonehead Re:it's not that slow (513 comments)

My friends have lots of pictures and videos of their kids.

Ahhh.... So you're one of those.... People who think it's more important to create a record of life than to actually live it.

You're missing out on a lot. I feel bad for you.

about 2 months ago
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Why Is US Broadband So Slow?

bonehead Re:Stranger danger hysteria (513 comments)

All of your points are invalid.

The practicality of that depends on the weather, whether the streets between where you live and the nearest public park have sidewalks, and crime levels in your neighborhood. A lot of parents are unwilling to let their kids play outside due to stranger danger hysteria.

If you have kids and live in a neighborhood where crime level is a factor in whether you can let them go outside during daylight hours, perhaps you need to re-examine your priorities. If you by into the "stranger danger" hysteria, perhaps you need to wake up. Yes, shit happens, but if you live in a generally safe location, the risk is low. If you don't live in a generally safe location, then you're just stupid.

The practicality of that depends on whether you happen to live within walking distance of a public library branch.

No. Get a tablet. Install the various e-book apps. Kindle, Nook, etc... Pretty much every book ever published is available. 5 minutes logged in to the free WiFi at a McDonalds would let you download enough books to satisfy your reading needs for a month. Also, why walking distance? Most people have to drive to get around, and those who don't tend to live in places with very good public transportation.

In order to determine in which direction to take my next post, I'd like to know this: Do you consider people who play video games likewise "couch potatoes"? A game download can be several GB.

Of course they are. Duh...

about 2 months ago
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Why Is US Broadband So Slow?

bonehead Re:Big picture remedy (513 comments)

Nuke it from orbit. It's the only way to be sure.

about 2 months ago
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Why Is US Broadband So Slow?

bonehead Re:How can the situation be improved? (513 comments)

California is an aberration, not representative of the US as a whole. NYC as well. Most of our political problems could be solved by getting rid of them.

about 2 months ago
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Why Is US Broadband So Slow?

bonehead Re:The tradgedy of the comms (513 comments)

That's why I'd be happy to pay more taxes for a government provided infrastructure

That's the part of your comment that makes no sense.

Government at all levels already extracts way more than enough tax money from us. There's no need for more.

The way to make funds available for worthwhile projects is to eliminate wasteful ones, and competently manage the substantial funds they already have to work with. Until that is done, there is NO acceptable reason for anyone paying more taxes than we already do.

about 2 months ago
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How About a Megatons To Megawatts Program For US Nuclear Weapons?

bonehead Re:Because 'Murica! (146 comments)

If you can kill the same 10 million people with a smaller bomb and a more accurate missile

Making your weapon smaller and more accurate DOES make it less scary.

Violence is scary. Random, indiscriminate violence is more scary.

I would counter your argument with the suggestion that a ridiculously large, but clumsily inaccurate weapon is far more scary than a weapon that only hits its intended targets.

If all I have are precision weapons, then all you need to do to be safe is make sure not to piss me off. If I have extremely powerful weapons with "unreliable" targeting, then it might be in your best interest to also put pressure on your neighbor to not piss me off.

about 2 months ago
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How About a Megatons To Megawatts Program For US Nuclear Weapons?

bonehead Re:Indeeeeed! (146 comments)

Your thinking is shallow.

At the end of the day, there is no such thing as a weapon of war. There are just weapons. There is no such thing as a tool of peace. There are just tools.

They are all just objects. Like pebbles or fallen branches. The don't *do* anything. They just exist. That's all. They don't endorse causes or have a political agenda. They just sit there and exist, perfectly content to do absolutely nothing and be perfectly harmless for the rest of eternity.

What matters is *who* has possession of them. The living, thinking creature that can make them do something.

Personally, I would prefer that the most powerful weapons be under the control of somebody who is, to at least some degree, on my side.

about 2 months ago
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How About a Megatons To Megawatts Program For US Nuclear Weapons?

bonehead Re:Because 'Murica! (146 comments)

Quite true. However, sometimes the thing that was failed was the attempt to convince someone else that you are sincere about being left alone.

Even more often, the "failure" was a hesitation to meet the unreasonable demands of an aggressor who wants you to relinquish possession of something valuable.

Violence is a two party game, you can't simply "choose" to never be involved in it.

What you can choose is whether or not you want to be the loser every time you are forced to participate.

about 2 months ago
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How About a Megatons To Megawatts Program For US Nuclear Weapons?

bonehead Re:Sherriff Bart (146 comments)

If my destruction is already determined, and there is no other way out, then having a way to convince the aggressor that he'll be going down with me is a perfectly valid tactic. Really, it's the only valid tactic on some situations.

about 2 months ago
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How About a Megatons To Megawatts Program For US Nuclear Weapons?

bonehead Re:Because 'Murica! (146 comments)

That may be a valid point, but it is an argument for *upgrading* weapons, not eliminating them.

about 2 months ago
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How About a Megatons To Megawatts Program For US Nuclear Weapons?

bonehead Re:Because 'Murica! (146 comments)

You misunderstand the true value of weapons.

If you have to use a weapon, that means you didn't have a big enough one.

Much better to have a weapon that is big enough, and scary enough that you don't ever have to actually use it.

about 2 months ago
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How About a Megatons To Megawatts Program For US Nuclear Weapons?

bonehead Re:Because 'Murica! (146 comments)

We couldn't possibly give up our strategic advantage in an area that has almost no usefulness in this period of time!

We could give up our strategic advantage, but it would be exceedingly stupid.

Weapons should be thought of as a form of insurance. In a perfect world, you'd never have to use it, but in the world we live in, it's foolish not to have it.

about 2 months ago
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Amazon Coins and How the Definition of 'Crypto-Currency' Is Getting Too Loose

bonehead Re:Different Solutions to Different Problems (115 comments)

They're intentionally mooching off the lite/doge/bitcoin name recognition.

No, I'm sure Amazon can afford much, much smarter marketing people than that.

When did bitcoin get big enough to have "name recognition"? Outside of geek circles the only people who have even heard of it have gotten their info from news articles about silkroad, and thus equate it to drug smuggling, gun running, human trafficking, etc....

I'm not a marketing guy, but if I was, and was looking for a good brand to leach off of, it sure as fuck wouldn't be "bitcoin".

about 2 months ago
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Amazon Coins and How the Definition of 'Crypto-Currency' Is Getting Too Loose

bonehead Re:Confusion over currency is not a new thing... (115 comments)

The quote you included doesn't really back up your point very well, but you do make a good point anyway.

The entire concept of money is 100% dependent on general trust and perception. If you want my boat, and I agree to sell it to you for $10,000, I'm not agreeing to it because those dollars have any particular value to me. I agree to it because I have confidence that I can trade them for something that does have value to me.

In other words, "money" has value because, and only because, we all agree it does. It's simply a proxy. We only accept it because we believe that someone else down the road will accept it as well.

If that system of confidence ever breaks down (and someday it will), we're probably all screwed.

about 2 months ago
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Amazon Coins and How the Definition of 'Crypto-Currency' Is Getting Too Loose

bonehead Re:Do we care? (115 comments)

There isn't anything special about paper money

If you truly believe that, then you really haven't thought this through.

A couple of hours ago I stopped at a convenience store and purchased a 12-pack of beer and a pack of smokes. I paid with one of my credit cards. I take it for granted that multiple entities can see that I made a purchase. I also take it for granted that most of them can take the total, subtract the sales tax, and then fairly easily determine which combination of items would have added up to that amount. Hell, that's pretty simple stuff, and I assume that "they" can do hard stuff, too.

Now, if I had thrown a $20 bill down on the counter instead of the credit card? "They" wouldn't get any info at all.

So why do I use credit cards? Honestly, I don't give a shit if "they" know I bought a 12-pack of shitty beer and a pack of smokes tonight.

But if I was making a purchase that I did want to keep to myself? Hell yeah, cash would be the only way to go.

At present, paper money is the one and only way to make a purchase and be assured of anonymity. To think that there isn't anything special about paper money is simply delusional.

about 2 months ago
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Amazon Coins and How the Definition of 'Crypto-Currency' Is Getting Too Loose

bonehead Re:Ok (115 comments)

But then, even without the beta, slashdot was scraping the bottom anyways.

Forget beta. Slashdot loses its credibility simply for the fact that "https://slashdot.org" doesn't work, and brings me back to the regular http site.

Yes, yes, I know... SSL is broken by design and offers no security against the NSA and their foreign counterparts. Still kinda handy for skirting corporate monitoring crap, though.....

about 2 months ago
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NSF Report Flawed; Americans Do Not Believe Astrology Is Scientific

bonehead Re:Really good question (326 comments)

If you have the good sense to see the meta-story, it's unchanged: "People are dumb".

FTFY

about 2 months ago
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FBI: $10,000 Reward For Info On Anyone Who Points a Laser At an Aircraft

bonehead Re:Is this really a problem? (445 comments)

Not true. There are plenty of cars out there with factory installed HIDs that completely blind me when I meet them on the highway.

It's not a problem that would probably be noticed by people who spend most of their time in the city, since there is enough light pollution there that your eyes don't dark adapt to the same degree. They've never caused me a problem in a city, but when you've been traveling down a rural highway and not met another car for 20 minutes, coming up on a fucking BMW or Mercedes with those damn things can and has blinded me to the point where I had to pull over for a few minutes to let my eyes recover.

about 2 months ago

Submissions

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Rejuvenating a stalled IT career.

bonehead bonehead writes  |  more than 5 years ago

bonehead (6382) writes "First, a little background. I've been working for the same small company for about 12 years as a one-man IT department. I took this job after becoming completely burned out with the corporate politics that seem to infect all large companies, and it's been a great job. My salary is a bit less than what I could make elsewhere, but I consider that to be a fair trade due to the relaxed atmosphere and fairly stress-free environment I've enjoyed over these years.

The problem is that our core business is part of an industry which, as a whole (i.e. not just my company) is now becoming obsolete due to advances in technology. My pleas to expand into other areas 5 years ago went unheard, and now that the situation is clear to the owner, the revenue just isn't there anymore to do much expanding. My personal prognosis is that we have about 2 years left before we're forced to turn out the lights and shut the doors for good.

I find myself in a bit of a bad situation when I consider future job prospects. Being a one-man IT department, I've become something of a jack of all trades, master of none (well, maybe a few). I've had opportunities to do a wide variety of work, and have done it all well. System administration, e-mail servers, file servers, backup systems, networking (mostly Cisco equipment), VOIP implementation, and programming (C++ and Java mainly), and a bit of network security, just to name a few. I've also done a bit of web development, and while I can crank out the PHP code for the backend, aesthetics aren't really my thing. The problem is that I've done such a wide variety of work, that I can't really walk into a job interview and honestly call myself an "expert" at any of those things.

Not a pleasant place to be at 38 years of age.

Given that I have a year or two before I need to move on, I feel that I have time to pick an area, acquire the necessary expertise, and salvage my situation. My question for the Slashdot community is, in the current IT job market, which skill set should I focus on? My original goal when I went to college was to be a programmer, and if I choose that route, what language would make me most marketable? Or would I be better off to pursue Cisco certifications and focus on networking? Or something else?"

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