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US Senate Set To Vote On Whether Climate Change Is a Hoax

bradgoodman That's like saying: (659 comments)

"U.S. Senate taking a vote on whether Denocrats all suck or not".

3 days ago
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Innocent Adults Are Easy To Convince They Committed a Serious Crime

bradgoodman Re: Understand your rights!! (291 comments)

Again - people need to understand it in more depth - it's more than that. Thinks like: never consent to a search, always insist that you want to leave, how to ask if you are being detained. Also understanding the reasoning behind these things - and what their positive and negative consequences are are importiant - and not always intuitive.

about a week ago
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Innocent Adults Are Easy To Convince They Committed a Serious Crime

bradgoodman Understand your rights!! (291 comments)

I'm not an extreme (left/right) crackpot - but I've read a bunch of their rethoric with respect to "knowing your rights" when it comes to dealing with police - and there is a LOT of merit to it!

This article speaks to the core of it.

These types of "false confessions" always follow the same pattern. Police with little or no circumstantial evidence pulling innocent people into long interrogations. They are happy to talk - because they are innocent, and letting all the facts come out can only help, right?

People need Serious education on how to handle situations like this. What to do and - NOT to do. What their rights are, and what will work best in their interests. Most of the time, the are involved in conversations that they have no obligation to have - and can leave at any time.

about a week ago
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Ask Slashdot: Linux Database GUI Application Development?

bradgoodman Linux Desktop, Really? (264 comments)

IMHO - a Linux "desktop" user GUI app? Really? I'd second-guess the approach, and before you discount me - hear me out...

Linux is all the bomb for the back-end, but not the front-end.

If you want to do that way - go for it. But in the world of Windows desktop (which you've already done), there are a lot of other avenues that seem more important. In several places that I've worked - and a lot of scientific and technical places that are big on Linux - MacOS is surprisingly where the desktop is, and the trend seem to be growing. Furthermore, iOS and Android are important "front-end platforms". too.

If you really wanted the Linux support - I would be (and have been) included to go the HTML-5 route. You get Linux, and many other front-ends for free.

In short - unless there is a pretty specific reason to believe you're going to have Linux users on the front-end, I'd stay away.

P.S. This is not going to be "The Year of the Linux Desktop".

about two weeks ago
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How a Massachusetts Man Invented the Global Ice Market

bradgoodman Ice... (83 comments)

"Currency of the Future". - Karl Hevacheck

about a month ago
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Electric Eel Shocks Like a Taser

bradgoodman Already knew that... (29 comments)

They describe this in the signage on the eel tank at the New England Aquarium. They even have a "shock" meter - and they tell you when it is getting ready to shock, you will see some spaced-out low-intensity pulses before "the big one".

about a month and a half ago
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Nuclear Weapons Create Their Own Security Codes With Radiation

bradgoodman Random Number Generation (106 comments)

So from what I am guessing - they are referring to using the radioactive decay of the materials for true random number generation. This concept isn't new - the unpredictability of radioactive decay has been a know source of "truly random" numbers. The article infers that it could use this to generate a key that could be shared with an external authentication mechanism - but you could do this with any random number source. You'd think they would have mentioned something like "quantum entanglement between the weapon and the president" (which might have been interesting) - but no.

about 2 months ago
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US Gov't Issues Alert About iOS "Masque Attack" Threat

bradgoodman Re:false flag? (98 comments)

Mod Up. Exactly what I thought upon reading the OP.

about 2 months ago
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Ask Slashdot: How To Unblock Email From My Comcast-Hosted Server?

bradgoodman Relay through Comcast (405 comments)

I had this problem too. I simply use Comcast's SMTP servers to relay my messages from my own SMTP server. You are required to configure SSL-secured transport only, and required to use your Comcast credentials when sending message to the relay. In-turn, when Comcast passes the messages, the services [you mentioned] accept them, but they still are shown as coming from my servers.

You don't have to "use Comcast's mail service" - they just want to use Comcast as a way of providing some accountability as to where the email is coming from - as a way of limiting spam.

about 2 months ago
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US School Installs 'Shooter Detection' System

bradgoodman Children (698 comments)

Won't somebody PLEASE think of the children!!

about 2 months ago
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OpenBSD Drops Support For Loadable Kernel Modules

bradgoodman Re: Devel/Debug (162 comments)

But then you'd need to reboot to load it, I'd assume.

about 3 months ago
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OpenBSD Drops Support For Loadable Kernel Modules

bradgoodman Devel/Debug (162 comments)

I shutter to think of how this would impact the development/debug cycle of an otherwise simple device driver.

about 3 months ago
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Internet Explorer Implements HTTP/2 Support

bradgoodman Re:1.2 Ghz, and again - binary orthogonal to compr (122 comments)

Compressed is faster on the wire, but takes more CPU time to decompress. If I have a 100GbE network connection coming into a server - my network bandwidth might outpace my compute abilities.

about 4 months ago
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Internet Explorer Implements HTTP/2 Support

bradgoodman Re:decompression: 800 Mbps (122 comments)

That doesn't mean anything. Were you running on a 3GHz Ivy Bridge server, or a little PIC IoT device? How much CPU time did it take? How many did your application need/require? Did the net result of header decompression along with the easier parsing of the binary header take more or fewer CPU resources then the older uncompressed, ASCII header? etc..etc..etc..

about 4 months ago
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Facebook Ready To Get Into Healthcare

bradgoodman Facebook: "The Privacy Kings" (99 comments)

I can't possibly envision ever making Facebook privy to ANY health issues whatsoever. They would gladly shill that information out for profit - undoubtibly why they're doing it. With something such as health issues which are so confidential, making Facebook privy to any of this would be absolutely terrible.

about 4 months ago
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Internet Explorer Implements HTTP/2 Support

bradgoodman Header Compression + Binary Headers (122 comments)

Seems like the efficiency you gain parsing the binary header would be lost with the need to first decompress it ;-)

about 4 months ago
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Why India's Mars Probe Was So Cheap

bradgoodman US Government (200 comments)

Are you implying that the US Government overpays, spending money and managing projects in a wasteful or inefficient manner? I say good day to you sir!

about 3 months ago
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Octopus-Inspired Robot Matches Real Octopus For Speed

bradgoodman Not "sustained" speed (71 comments)

Creatures that use this form of population do it only for "bursts" - like to escape a predator. They cannot sustain this speed. If they used this form of propulsion for a submarine, that would be one hell of a jerky ride.

about 4 months ago

Submissions

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Reports: NSA has cracked much online encryption

bradgoodman bradgoodman writes  |  about a year ago

bradgoodman (964302) writes "CNN is reporting that the NSA in conjunction with the UK equivalent QCHQ has "cracked much online encryption". This seems to have been done by an ongoing attempt to systematically add "backdoors" and other hidden vulnerabilities into a multitude of commercial services, products and web sites. It does not go on to explicitly state there has necessarily been any "new math" in attacking the underlying algorithms themselves, though it does mention the use of "supercomputers" in the cracking."
Link to Original Source
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Massive New Ninth Planet Found?

bradgoodman bradgoodman writes  |  more than 3 years ago

bradgoodman (964302) writes "The Independent reports: "If you grew up thinking there were nine planets and were shocked when Pluto was demoted five years ago, get ready for another surprise. There may be nine after all, and Jupiter may not be the largest.

The hunt is on for a gas giant up to four times the mass of Jupiter thought to be lurking in the outer Oort Cloud, the most remote region of the solar system. The orbit of Tyche (pronounced ty-kee), would be 15,000 times farther from the Sun than the Earth's, and 375 times farther than Pluto's, which is why it hasn't been seen so far.

But scientists now believe the proof of its existence has already been gathered by a Nasa space telescope, Wise, and is just waiting to be analysed. ""

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Google opening Wave to 100,000 beta testers

bradgoodman bradgoodman writes  |  more than 5 years ago

bradgoodman writes "CNN reports that Google Wave, a product that promises to revolutionize online communication, will go out to about 100,000 beta testers Wednesday. Google demonstrated Wave at the Google I/O developer conference in San Francisco, California, in May. The closed group of beta testers will help Google fish bugs out of the application before a public release by the end of the year, according to the Google Wave Web site."
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Happy 25th, Macintosh!

bradgoodman bradgoodman writes  |  about 6 years ago

bradgoodman writes "Saturday marks the 25th anniversary of the original Macintosh. Two days after the legendary Super Bowl ad, the Mac was available. Has it really been that long? Wow, do I feel old! Happy Birthday, Macintosh!"
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Hudson Plane Crash - Are you outraged?

bradgoodman bradgoodman writes  |  about 6 years ago

bradgoodman writes "There is no doubt that the landing and rescue of US Airways flight 1549 on the Hudson River was nothing short of remarkable — but am I alone in my outrage? Everyone on the Titanic would have survived had it gone down in the middle of the Hudson river in the middle of the afternoon. Didn't the Titanic teach us that we needed life rafts for everyone on board? There were none for the vast majority of passengers. Even with the landing as flawless as it was, had this happened even a few miles off shore, hypothermia could have killed dozens of people. One of the rafts inflated even upside down. Is this going to ignite some major changes? I think we got very lucky."
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Chicka Chick Boom Boom: Cryptography for Toddlers?

bradgoodman bradgoodman writes  |  more than 6 years ago

bradgoodman writes "Am I just having one of those psychotic episodes where you see similarities and correlations between random things, or... Is the popular Children's alphabet book "Chicka Chicka Boom Boom" really about cryptography?

For those who aren't familiar with it — the first page reads like a textbook case from a cryptography text:

"A told B, and B told C: "I'll meet you at the top of the coconut tree."

The illustrations go on to depict the letters of the alphabet — scrambled, mangled, contorted and rearranged. Is there a conspiracy here, or do I just need to lay-off of the cold medicine?"

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Wii Fit: Emperor's New Clothes?

bradgoodman bradgoodman writes  |  more than 6 years ago

bradgoodman writes "I've seen the Central Park release event, and been hearing all the buzz about Wii Fit on the web, in the media, and from other users. I'd frantically gone from store to store every day until I finally got my hands on one. I rushed home and tried it, and, what a let down! I don't want to go into detail on why it is so bad, and how it is nearly impossible to get even a moderate workout from this device. My Wife was all excited for it, tried it once, and that was the end of that. My question to Slashdot is: Why is everyone so up on Wii Fit? Why hasn't everyone realized how poor it is? Where is all the hype coming from? Is this an artifact of Nintendo's artificial short-supply — i.e. if you can't get it, you want it even more? Who can I slap to snap them out of it?"
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World of telecom about to change as we know it?

bradgoodman bradgoodman writes  |  more than 7 years ago

bradgoodman writes "We've all heard of Google's coveting of the 700MHz spectrum, and of their desire to keep it "open" with respect to equipment that can be used on it. Then there is of course the "gPhone", and it's OS, etc. Today I heard for the first time (I live under a rock) about their acquisition of a service called "GrandCenteral". GrandCenteral does a lot with integrating land-lines, multiple phones, incoming calls, contact managment, voice-mail, etc. etc. and of course wraps it in with web-based management. I initially thought it was pretty different and interesting, imagining what you could do with it. That's when the light-blulb turned on: Using custom equipment (gPhone) on a spectrum (700MHz) which would integrate it into a completely new type of telecom paradigm (GrandCentral) — is there a coup brewing in the world of telephony as we know it???"
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Man flies 193 miles in lawn chair

bradgoodman bradgoodman writes  |  more than 7 years ago

bradgoodman writes "BEND, Oregon (AP) — Last weekend, Kent Couch settled down in his lawn chair with some snacks — and a parachute. Attached to his lawn chair were 105 large helium balloons.

Balloons suspend Kent Couch in a lawn chair as he floats in the skies near Bend, Oregon, on Saturday.

With instruments to measure his altitude and speed, a global positioning system device in his pocket, and about four plastic bags holding five gallons of water each to act as ballast — he could turn a spigot, release water and rise — Couch headed into the Oregon sky."

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