×

Announcing: Slashdot Deals - Explore geek apps, games, gadgets and more. (what is this?)

Thank you!

We are sorry to see you leave - Beta is different and we value the time you took to try it out. Before you decide to go, please take a look at some value-adds for Beta and learn more about it. Thank you for reading Slashdot, and for making the site better!

Comments

top

What Is Your Favorite Way of Watching a Movie

brunascle Digital Media Player (409 comments)

A digital media player, with files usually coming from a ripped blu-ray or DVD.

more than 2 years ago
top

How many robocalls do you get each month?

brunascle Re:"Credit Card Services" (228 comments)

You're not alone. I've filed 3 or 4 complaints with donotcall.gov about "Cardholder Services".

about 3 years ago
top

With regards to beer, I prefer it to be:

brunascle Re:Beer differences are mostly nonexistant. (840 comments)

If you're referring specifically to the big name pilsners -- Bud, Coors, Miller, Heineken, Corona -- you're absolutely right, they taste exactly the same. But if you open yourself up to the lesser known varieties -- pale ale, IPA, hefeweizen, stout, etc -- you'll see that they do in fact taste very different.

more than 3 years ago
top

Apple Remove Samba From OS X 10.7 Because of GPLv3

brunascle Re:GPL is the problem (1075 comments)

if you try to promote freedom and free code

That's the thing, the GPL isn't about free code, it's about free software. It's about the end user's freedom, not the developer's. That's what differentiates it from the BSD license.

more than 3 years ago
top

Duke Nukem Forever Multiplayer Mode Predictably Controversial

brunascle sounds like Science and Industry (344 comments)

The original Half-Life mod Science and Industry played like a CTF game. The "flags" were scientists, and you captured them by hitting them on they head with a briefcase and carrying them back to your base. What a fun game.

more than 3 years ago
top

How To Use HTML5 Today

brunascle Re:Meanwhile, back at the ranch ... (155 comments)

Only just now. It works. I'm a little hesitant to rely on it though, as the styling would be completely messed up for IE users with javascript disabled. But then again, the percentage of IE users with javascript disabled is probably very low.

more than 4 years ago
top

How To Use HTML5 Today

brunascle Re:Meanwhile, back at the ranch ... (155 comments)

That doesn't work. IE doesn't add the new tags to the DOM properly; tags withing the <article> tag will be added as siblings to the <article>, rather than children. The only way I've found to make an HTML5 site work in IE is to surround all the new tags with old tags, and reference the old tags in the CSS.
For example: <div class="article"><article>...

more than 4 years ago
top

Where Are the Joysticks For Retro Gaming?

brunascle Re:XArcade. (262 comments)

4-way movement for Crazy Kong / Donkey Kong is more difficult as the Tankstick has 8-way movement

I was going to say the same thing. I bought it specifically for Ms. Pacman, Donkey Kong, and Frogger, and unfortunately it's unusable in all 3. A keyboard works much better.

more than 4 years ago
top

Avatar Blu-Ray DRM Issues

brunascle Already cracked. (376 comments)

The stable release of AnyDVD HD (6.6.3.4) doesnt support Avatar, but the beta version does ( http://forum.slysoft.com/showthread.php?t=40115 ). It took me longer to update the firmware on my bluray player than it took me to update AnyDVD HD. Though the actual ripping still takes about 4 hours...

more than 4 years ago
top

Blu-ray Proposes Incompatible BD-XL and IH-BD Formats

brunascle Re:Probably another agenda here... (252 comments)

Once you upgrade the firmware, the Argosy HV335T can play Bluray ISOs (I just bought one and it works). It only plays the main title movie, though. It cant play the menu or display subtitles, but it can do both with DVD ISOs.

more than 4 years ago
top

NewEgg Confirms Shipping Fake Core i7s

brunascle Re:BS (314 comments)

Not Newegg. That was D&H Distributing, the company that was originally (falsely) accused.

more than 4 years ago
top

IE8 Update Forces IE As Default Browser

brunascle Re:IE 6 will love on for many people...even th (311 comments)

Outlook 2007 switched from using IE's rendering engine to MS Word's, so actually you've got it backwards. As bad as IE's rendering is, it's light years ahead of Word's.

more than 5 years ago
top

IE8 Update Forces IE As Default Browser

brunascle Re:Death to IE6! (311 comments)

He means serving it with the application/xhtml+xml content type, rather than text/html.

more than 5 years ago
top

Mythbusters Accidentally Bust Windows In Nearby Town

brunascle Re:NASA problem (500 comments)

My physics teacher in high school would zap students he didn't like with a small Tesla coil.

more than 5 years ago
top

Barack Obama Sworn In As 44th President of the US

brunascle Re:Optionally (1656 comments)

As long as a Gay man can do what a straight man can do (marry someone of the opposite sex) then they have the same rights. The blacks and so on were actually barred from marrying into interracial marriages at one time which is completely different then gay marriage.

... what?

As long as a black man can do what a white man can do (marry someone of the same race) then they have the same rights.

how is that completely different?

more than 5 years ago
top

AIX On the Desktop Is Getting the Boot

brunascle Re:The march towards Linux (366 comments)

And, are desktop POWER machines going to be available with Linux?

Fixstars (formerly Terra Soft) offers a power-based workstation called the PowerStation, running Yellow Dog Linux. I think it's a new product. There was a review in the latest issue of Linux Journal. It mentioned a few problems, including X crashing (but that may have been fixed by now).

more than 6 years ago
top

Science's Alternative To an Intelligent Creator

brunascle Re:The anthropic principle isn't a principle. (683 comments)

After all, the big bang theory requires FTL travel (faster than light)

No, it doesnt. You're talking the inflationary period, where space itself expanded faster than light. This is not FTL travel.

FTL travel means moving from one point in space to a different point. The objects all stayed in the same place, it was the space that expanded between them, as it is still doing now.

more than 6 years ago
top

Science's Alternative To an Intelligent Creator

brunascle Re:The anthropic principle isn't a principle. (683 comments)

resulting in Einstein describing general relativity (and special relativity) as "his biggest mistake ever".

He did not. He called the cosmological constant, the unknown force that kept the universe from collapsing in on itself, his biggest mistake ever.

Decades later it turned out he was right all along, when it was discovered that the universe was expanding at an accelerating rate.

more than 6 years ago

Submissions

top

Activision Goes After Individual Game Pirates

brunascle brunascle writes  |  more than 6 years ago

brunascle (994197) writes "Activision has begun suing individual pirates of console games. Edge Online is reporting that they are going after a New York resident for allegedly copying Call of Duty 3 for the Xbox 360 and other games, seeking $30,000 to $150,000 in damages for each infringement. GamePolitics has also uncovered 6 other lawsuits with settlements between $1,000 and $100,000, in 5 of which the defendant was unrepresented."
top

TorrentSpy Shuts Down

brunascle brunascle writes  |  more than 6 years ago

brunascle (994197) writes "After prolonged legal battles, the popular BitTorrent search engine TorrentSpy has shut down. The notice on their home page explains, "The legal climate in the USA for copyright, privacy of search requests, and links to torrent files in search results is simply too hostile... Ultimately the Court demanded actions that in our view were inconsistent with our privacy policy, traditional court rules, and International law; therefore, we now feel compelled to provide the ultimate method of privacy protection for our users — permanent shutdown.""
top

Human-Aided Computing, Subconsciously

brunascle brunascle writes  |  more than 7 years ago

brunascle (994197) writes "Microsoft Researchers are trying to harness untapped brain power for use in tasks where computers typically struggle, but humans find easy, such as facial recognition. While the concept of human-aided computing isnt new, this team's effort differs from previous projects in that it does not involve conscious feedback from the person. Instead, an EEG cap is worn, connected to a computer that examines brain activity. "In one scenario, he explains, pictures would be placed in people's peripheral vision, which doesn't require focused cognitive attention, so they could go about their daily tasks." The team reports 72.5% accuracy of facial recognition when using a single person to view an image once."
Link to Original Source
top

brunascle brunascle writes  |  more than 7 years ago

brunascle (994197) writes "A post to the Windows Vista blog has stated that Bill Laing's comments about the end of 32-bit versions of Windows only applied to Windows Server, not Client. According to Alex Heaton, "we have not decided when Windows Client will follow Windows Server and become 64-bit only." This clears up previous discussions, including one here on Slashdot, that assumed the comments applied to both Server and Client."
top

brunascle brunascle writes  |  more than 7 years ago

brunascle (994197) writes "British Telecom is working on a plan to replace the keyboard and mouse with motion-sensing accelerometers on tablet PCs, which would allow users to interact with the PC simply by tilting it. The pilot project consists of a USB adapter that plugs directly into any tablet PC. "One of my initial applications entails using the PC to manipulate a marble on the screen," says BT researcher David Chatting. While motion-sension accelerometers certainly arent new, what with the huge success of the Wii and its Wiimote and the screen-rotating feature of the upcoming iPhone, this novel use of them opens up a wide range of opportunities for handheld devices."
top

brunascle brunascle writes  |  more than 7 years ago

brunascle (994197) writes "A new theoretical design using nanowires could provide a way to cloak visible light. Advancing on last year's microwave-cloaking breakthrough, the new design is theoretically able to work in the upper end of the visible spectrum, at a wavelength of 632.8 nanometers — visible red light. The researches behind it are calling it the first practical design of its kind to work in the visible spectrum. At around 400 to 700nm, visible light has a much shorter wavelength than microwave, 1mm to 30cm. Because of this, using this technology in the visible spectrum requires components just 40 nanometers in size. The group is now working on an actual device using the theoretical design."
top

brunascle brunascle writes  |  more than 7 years ago

brunascle (994197) writes "Researchers have devised a new way to patch hardware. By treating a computer chip more like software than hardware, Josep Torrellas, a computer science professor from the University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign, believes we will be able to fix defective hardware by a applying a patch, similar to the way defective software is handled. His system, dubbed Phoenix, consists of a standard semiconductor device called a field programmable gate array (FPGA). Although generally slower than their application-specific integrated circuit counterparts, FPGAs have the advantage of being able to be modified post-production. Defects found on a Phoenix-enabled chip could be resolved by downloading a patch and applying it to the hardware. Torrellas believes this would give chips a shorter time to market, saying "If they know that they could fix the problems later on, they could beat the competition to market.""
top

brunascle brunascle writes  |  more than 7 years ago

brunascle (994197) writes "Technology Review has an article about recent advances in animated fluid dynamics made by Mathieu Desbrun, a computer science professor at Caltech. "He and his team are developing an entirely new approach to fluid motion, based on new mathematics called discrete differential geometry, that use equations designed specifically to be solved by computers rather than people." Desbrun explains that the currently in-use equations for anitmating fluid dynamics were not developed with computers in mind, and were simply reworkings of older equations. He claims that his new equations use about the same amout of computer resources, but with much better results. The article includes a 5 minute (flash) video demonstrating various results using his equations, ending with 2 fascinating and vivid displays: the first of a snowglobe, and the second of a cloud of smoke filling a volume in the shape of a bunny."
top

brunascle brunascle writes  |  more than 7 years ago

brunascle (994197) writes "MIT Technology Review has an interesting article explaining how Digg uses visualization tools, developed by the design firm Stamen, to help combat cheating. Stamen was responsible for developing Digg Labs, which also produced the visualization tools Digg Swarm and Digg Stack. The article includes a graph of diggs, with the X axis representing users and the Y axis representing stories. Near-solid vertical lines describe atypical digging behavior, and may indicate the presence of a bot."
top

brunascle brunascle writes  |  about 8 years ago

brunascle (994197) writes "Technology Review has an interview with Bjarne Stroustrup, the inventor of C++, in which he defends his legacy and examines what's wrong with most software code. Stroustrup explains that developers are too interested in getting something to work, rather than understanding how it works. "Software developers have become adept at the difficult art of building reasonably reliable systems out of unreliable parts. The snag is that often we do not know exactly how we did it...""
top

brunascle brunascle writes  |  more than 8 years ago

brunascle (994197) writes "A new technology in development could allow small devices, including cell phones, to project HD-quality video. 'A projector based on the device would be about the size of dime and could cast a meter-wide image on a surface only half a meter away.... The researchers report mirror vibration frequencies of 35,000 cycles per second — enough, they say, to scan an image with a resolution of about 1280 by 768 pixels about 60 times a second.'"
top

brunascle brunascle writes  |  more than 8 years ago

brunascle (994197) writes "MIT's Technology Review has an article about a new technology that uses an ion pump to cool microchips. 'The pump has two basic parts. An electrode tip emits a high voltage that strips electrons from molecules of oxygen and nitrogen in the air, ionizing them. These positively charged ions then flow from the tip to a negatively charged collector electrode. As the ions stream to the collector electrode, "they drag the surrounding air with them, creating a net flow of air,"'"

Journals

brunascle has no journal entries.

Slashdot Login

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?