×

Announcing: Slashdot Deals - Explore geek apps, games, gadgets and more. (what is this?)

Thank you!

We are sorry to see you leave - Beta is different and we value the time you took to try it out. Before you decide to go, please take a look at some value-adds for Beta and learn more about it. Thank you for reading Slashdot, and for making the site better!

Comments

top

Verizon, Cable Lobby Oppose Spec-Bump For Broadband Definition

buddyglass Re:two thoughts (255 comments)

Redbox, coupled with Netflix's service where they mail you the discs.

4 days ago
top

Verizon, Cable Lobby Oppose Spec-Bump For Broadband Definition

buddyglass Re:two thoughts (255 comments)

I've steamed movies over this DSL connection. On a laptop. Point being: not everybody streams HD movies. You seem to want to define "broadband" as "what it takes to adequately stream HD content". That seems like a somewhat arbitrary way to define "broadband".

4 days ago
top

Verizon, Cable Lobby Oppose Spec-Bump For Broadband Definition

buddyglass two thoughts (255 comments)

1. The FCC should establish a "moving definition". Identify a set of peer countries and define U.S. "broadband" relative to some measure of those countries' broadband capability. Maybe "broadband" is "just faster than the slowest peer nation". Or maybe it's "the median among all peer nations". Etc. Revise the standard yearly according to the moving definition.

2. To what extent is Sweden's network access made cheaper by way of public subsidy? The amount of the subsidy should be included in the "price", even if it's less visible.

3. Not everybody streams HD video. If you don't stream HD video then 25/3 is more than adequate. I watch TV shows from Hulu on my laptop over a 6 Mbps DSL connection.

4 days ago
top

Justified: Visual Basic Over Python For an Intro To Programming

buddyglass Re:my vote: (648 comments)

I agree. LoC needed to implement Hello World is a dumb metric. Even by that dumb metric, though, he exaggerates, since the number needed in Java is 6 and not 50.

about two weeks ago
top

Justified: Visual Basic Over Python For an Intro To Programming

buddyglass Re:my vote: (648 comments)

Huh. I thought the whole "community" aspect w/ Java allowed for more non-Oracle input into the development of the language, whereas VB and C# were tightly controlled by MS. If you're cynical you could view Java as being tightly controlled by the triumvirate of IBM, Google and Oracle. I agree you can find a job doing .Net, but I'd still argue if you had to choose between the two (C# and Java) then Java is probably the better choice of the two (if only because it potentially opens up Android positions and there are many more Android positions than Windows Mobile).

If I were designing an undergraduate C.S. curriculum I'd want students exposed to Java, C, Python and SQL (arguably not really a "programming" language). C# would be a bonus. Probably also some functional language (Scheme, Lisp) just so they leave with a sense of what those languages are like. If I were designing a high school curriculum and had to choose a single language to teach, given the present realities of university curricula and industry adoption, I'd go with Java.

about two weeks ago
top

Justified: Visual Basic Over Python For an Intro To Programming

buddyglass Re:my vote: (648 comments)

Java is pretty much only fit for the enterprise

Google would seem to disagree.

where it was developed in order to pad out kLOC numbers and the corresponding contracts.

False.

Enjoy your hello world in 5 lines of code, 50 lines of syntatic sugar, and 500 lines of XML.

Exagerration. Hello World in Java is about six non-empty lines, i.e. on par with C.

about two weeks ago
top

Justified: Visual Basic Over Python For an Intro To Programming

buddyglass Re:my vote: (648 comments)

I've used Ruby and Java and, honestly, I prefer Java. But I recognize I'm an outlier in that respect. C#/VB + Mono gets you additional platform support, but not quite as robust as the situation with Java. Also, despite Mono, isn't the "spec" for VB tied to Microsoft in a way that exceeds Java's link to Oracle? C# and VB (especially VB) are also not as popular in industry. So Java has that advantage over those two. Nor are they what's commonly used in intro courses at universities which, IMO, should be a factor in deciding what to teach pre-university students.

about two weeks ago
top

Justified: Visual Basic Over Python For an Intro To Programming

buddyglass my vote: (648 comments)

Java. It has the broadest popularity in industry, isn't tied to any one company (e.g. Microsoft), can be developed using a wide variety of host operating systems (Windows, Mac, Linux), lends itself well to teaching O.O. design and has a wealth of free tools. It's also what the majority of universities use in their intro level courses. (Though that's changing.)

about two weeks ago
top

Tumblr Co-Founder: Apple's Software Is In a Nosedive

buddyglass solution: (598 comments)

Fewer features in each release. More time to fix bugs, test, "get it right the first time".

about three weeks ago
top

Red Hat Engineer Improves Math Performance of Glibc

buddyglass Re:excellent (226 comments)

It currently doesn't, but BSD's code could make the same guarantee, right? At the point where it recurses left and right, compare the length of the two sub-arrays. Sort the shorter one first via a recursive call, then take advantage of the tail recursion and sort the larger one by overwriting the current stack frame and jumping back to the top of the function. They already go halfway (taking advantage of the tail recursion); they just don't use any heuristic to choose which sub-array gets sorted via the recursive call. It's always the "left" side.

about a month ago
top

Red Hat Engineer Improves Math Performance of Glibc

buddyglass Re:excellent (226 comments)

It looks like GNU actually allocates its custom stack *on the stack*. However, in the comments they claim their algorithm guarantees that the stack need only be as large as log(sort elements), so they allocate a stack that is (in theory) guaranteed to be big enough. You can check out the code here. I'm not sure what version of glibc that's from, but it looks similar to what I extracted from 2.10 a while back.

about a month ago
top

Red Hat Engineer Improves Math Performance of Glibc

buddyglass Re:excellent (226 comments)

It should be noted that since both BSD and GNU versions rely on a stack (and neither chooses its pivot point randomly, so far as I know) they're both vulnerable to crafted data that's designed to cause the algorithm to exhaust its stack. It's possible GNU dynamically grows its custom stack when it nears the point of exhaustion, but I kind of doubt it.

about a month ago
top

Red Hat Engineer Improves Math Performance of Glibc

buddyglass Re:excellent (226 comments)

Slasdot ate my less-than symbol. They short-circuit to insertion when N < 7.

about a month ago
top

Red Hat Engineer Improves Math Performance of Glibc

buddyglass Re:excellent (226 comments)

They use the method described in Bentley & McIlroy's paper, which uses a "median of medians" for large arrays, a simple median of first/last/middle for mid-sized arrays and the mid-point for small arrays. See page 1255 here. No idea how effective that is. They also short-circuit to insertion sort when N 7 for a given sort window.

about a month ago
top

Hunting For a Tech Job In 2015

buddyglass Re:Wow, no (174 comments)

So your current salary is approximately 2x what you started at 10 years ago (i.e. 1.07^10)? Nice. I'm 15.5 years into my career since graduating with a M.S. If my salary 15 years ago is what I think it was (am having trouble remembering) then I'm averaging only 5%/year. It's possible that the yearly increase is steeper during the first 10 years than in the next 10. Then again, maybe I'm just consoling myself. :)

about a month ago
top

Red Hat Engineer Improves Math Performance of Glibc

buddyglass Re:excellent (226 comments)

Agreed. It would be interesting to know the smallest number of crafted sort elements needed to cause BSD's qsort() to exceed a "normal" stack size, whatever that happens to be. If an array with that number of elements and a reasonable element size (probably sizeof(void*) since elements are almost always pointers) will always be larger than the largest system memory size then, in theory, we wouldn't need to worry about exceeding the available call stack.

It may be the case, though, that it is possible to fit a crafted sequence of keys into a reasonable amount of space that will cause BSD qsort() to exceed a "normal" stack size.

about a month ago
top

Hunting For a Tech Job In 2015

buddyglass Re:economy doing well? (174 comments)

How many of those apps are simply re-branded versions of some core you wrote?

All of them. The company couldn't exist if we had to code up a unique app for every customer. My point is that the fact of there being "lots of apps in the store" doesn't mean the number of app "producers" is correspondingly large. I thought I made that clear when I said, "it's not quite a 1-1 from app to company".

about a month ago
top

Red Hat Engineer Improves Math Performance of Glibc

buddyglass Re:excellent (226 comments)

This is just one data point, but I recently compared the BSD and GNU qsort() code. Built both with LLVM (on a Mac), tried both -O2 and -O3, and did some crude benchmarking. IIRC the BSD code was slightly more efficient, not to mention drastically simpler. BSD basically uses the Bentley & McIlroy code from "Engineering a Sort Function" with a few small optimizations to make it more adaptive (and exploit the fact that the algorithm is tail-recursive). So the BSD version is still recursive, whereas GNU is non-recursive but manages its own stack.

about a month ago
top

Hunting For a Tech Job In 2015

buddyglass Re:economy doing well? (174 comments)

Yes. I imagine the skill set for low-level video game testers is pretty minimal, and they have a built-in advantage because so many (IMO foolish) people are disproportionately interested in "video game testing" compared to other things they could be doing with their time. I live in Austin, by the way. You can easily get $10 at many high-end fast food places (e.g. Rudy's BBQ). You can undoubtedly make more than $16/hr if you can successfully transition from "video game tester" to "QA Engineer" and get out of the gaming industry. But you'd have to be more than a random-button-pusher. Writing test plans, QA automation, etc.

about a month ago
top

Hunting For a Tech Job In 2015

buddyglass Re:economy doing well? (174 comments)

That changes the equation somewhat, I agree. Some thoughts:

1. Moving cross-country to take a $16/hr job when you have no savings is somewhat risky, as your friend found out. How much could he have made in CA if he hadn't moved? How much did the initial move from California to Texas cost? If it cost $1000 to move one-way and he was able to earn $3/hr more (after taxes) than in CA then he would have recouped the cost of his move (round-trip) in 4 months time.
2. If he was able to earn more in Texas than in CA then I'm going to assume the job prospects for his skill set were superior in Texas. So even after he lost the initial job he was still better positioned in Texas than in CA.
3. The person making $16/hr probably doesn't need a 20ft U-Haul trailer. If he didn't have furniture (or was willing to sell and re-buy after the move) and had a reasonable car then 1750 miles / 20mpg * $2/gallon = $175. That's a much cheaper move.

about a month ago

Submissions

top

The Fiscal Cliff: What's your bill?

buddyglass buddyglass writes  |  more than 2 years ago

buddyglass (925859) writes "As most slashdotters in the United States are aware the impending fiscal cliff will hit in 2013 unless a compromise is reached beforehand. Want to know the impact to your household in the absence of any compromise? Turns out there's an app for that. It should be interesting to see how different readers' households are affected by the "full cliff" scenario as well as various alternate proposals."
Link to Original Source
top

London Stock Exchange delays Linux switch

buddyglass buddyglass writes  |  more than 4 years ago

buddyglass (925859) writes "Citing scalability concerns after its test platform "Turqoise" was knocked offline for two hours by unusually high volume, the London Stock Exchange announced that it is delaying its planned switch from Microsoft to Linux. The switch was initially motivated by a desire for shorter latencies. Notably, the NASDAQ uses a scalable Linux-based system that achieves trade latencies 25ms shorter than the LSE's planned deployment."
Link to Original Source
top

No more Windows bugs?

buddyglass buddyglass writes  |  about 5 years ago

buddyglass (925859) writes "Past submitters have focused on previous "Patch Tuesdays" in which Microsoft has issued fixes for a record number of issues. Examples here and here. It seems only fair, then, to mention that the software maker intends to release only a single fix this iteration, addressing an issue that is only considered critical for Windows 2000 systems. If past releases with large numbers of fixes were evidence of the poor quality of Microsoft software, and by extension the closed source model in general, does this upcoming Tuesday represent some level of vindication?"
Link to Original Source
top

Climate change consensus questioned?

buddyglass buddyglass writes  |  more than 6 years ago

buddyglass (925859) writes "In 2004 Naomi Oreskes examined 928 abstracts of peer-reviewed journal articles published from 1993-2003 and announced an overwhelming agreement in favor of the "consensus view" of climate change, which states that human activity bears at least partial responsibility. Her methods were recently repeated by one Dr. Klaus-Martin Schulte, who examined 528 abstracts of peer-reviewed journal articles published from 2004-2007. Dr. Schulte's study found that 45% of articles agreed with the consensus view, either explicitly or implicitly, whereas 6% explicitly disagreed. Another 48% were explicitly neutral, refusing to support or deny the consensus view. Does this draw into question the notion that there is an unequivocal consensus among climate change researchers with regard to human activity's effect on the global climate?"
Link to Original Source
top

How would you refocus linux development?

buddyglass buddyglass writes  |  more than 7 years ago

buddyglass (925859) writes "The majority of Slashdot users are no doubt appreciative of linux in the general sense, but I suspect we all have some application or aspect of the platform that we wish was more stable, performant, feature-rich, etc. So my question is a hypothetical one: if you were able to devote a "significant" number of resources (read: high-quality developers) to a particular app or area of the kernel, and were able to set the focus for those resources (stability, performance, new features, etc.), what application or kernel area would you attempt to improve, and what would you focus on improving?"

Journals

buddyglass has no journal entries.

Slashdot Login

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?