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Scientists/Actress Say They Were 'Tricked' Into Geocentric Universe Movie

bughunter Re:Re where is the controversy? (639 comments)

From the bottom up, of course...

about a week ago
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Navy Debuts New Railgun That Launches Shells at Mach 7

bughunter Re:So... (630 comments)

Next up: flinging poo at mach 25.

about a week ago
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AMD Unveils the Liquid-Cooled, Dual-GPU Radeon R9 295X2 At $1,500

bughunter Re:here's how stupid this is (146 comments)

Well if you're gonna go there, then ultimately, pretty much everything is radiatively coupled to interstellar space.

about two weeks ago
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60 Minutes Dubbed Engines Noise Over Tesla Model S

bughunter Re:60 minutes is not longer of value (544 comments)

This.

I switched to recording America's Funniest Videos on Sundays after the sloppy wet one they gave Amazon last year. They were on probation after the propaganda microphone they gave to the NSA last year, and the string of soggy panty pieces Lara Logan has been giving for their coverage of the US military abroad.

There's more truth in 60 seconds of AFV than there is in an entire episode of 60 Minutes.

about two weeks ago
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Should NASA Send Astronauts On Voluntary One-Way Missions?

bughunter Re:There should always be contingency plans.. (307 comments)

I voted (3), but really, the answer depends on the purpose of the mission, and the overall purpose of the space program.

If the point is to colonize other worlds, open new frontiers, escape the confines of this single planet in order to ensure the survival of humans and other terrestrial species, then there's no point. If you can't establish a viable colony, then you're not ready yet. Send robots until you are. Build and expand in stages.

If the purpose is commercial, then the answer is similar but for a different reason: it has no ROI. If you can't return, then the investment required just to get humans to Mars alive is too great. Again, send a robot.

If the purpose is PR (which is one of NASA's priorities) then the answer is maybe -- as in yes, but only if the PR is positive and promotes the kind of optics the agency wants. This kind of mission is more of a stunt, a spectacle, than promoting science and exploration. Right now, NASA's PR mission is more of the latter than the former, but who knows -- perhaps NASA needs more of a spectacle. Look at how much attention the Mars rovers get, and it's because they're more than a little bit spectacular.

If the purpose is pure science and exploration, then yes. If there are volunteers, why not? Plenty of explorers throughout history have taken huge risks and paid for their lives to expand human knowledge, and we've benefited. If they're willing, then who are we to judge?

about two weeks ago
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Your Car Will Tell You How To Hit the Next Green Light

bughunter How about telling the Light what to do instead? (364 comments)

In my city, every signal-controlled intersection has sensors, even though most intersections between heavily trafficked streets appear to work on timers. The side streets with signals, however, use the sensor to interrupt cross traffic - usually after some combination of delay and count of waiting cars.

Unfortunately this combination appears more often than not to waste fuel and create more pollution. This is because the algorithm doesn't coordinate between intersections, or use cross-street sensors to detect a break in the cross traffic that will allow the one or two side street cars cross. Instead, Murphy's law reigns, and one or two cars needing to cross the main boulevard will be forced to wait at a red light while gaps in the cross traffic go by, and then several dozen cars will be forced to stop while the one or two cars use the intersection, and then several dozen cars must accelerate from a stop again.

My city is home to JPL and Cal Tech. We can send robots to Mars and spacecraft into interstellar space. But we can't coordinate sensors across the city to prevent me (and 30 others) from having to stop at a red light so that one car can pass, and then watch the intersection go unused for another 90 seconds... again and again and again as I cross town. Even more frequently, I see people sit at lights on side streets waiting thru gaps in traffic clearly long enough for crossing.

We have the necessary high bandwidth wireless communication, mesh networking technology, and computing power to change this. But it isn't happening.

I know that the only reason it's not already done is because it's not important to the people who manage this sort of thing, not important enough to spend the necessary money on R&D and implementation, anyway. But air quality and pollution are very important in Southern California. Isn't it important enough for something as solveable as this?

Surely someone in Pasadena or Cambridge or Santa Clara or Pasadena or Austin or Raleigh or Atlanta -- name your tech hub -- has an interest.

about two weeks ago
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Your Car Will Tell You How To Hit the Next Green Light

bughunter Re:Its called paying attention (364 comments)

In my city, I've seen numerous instances where the countdown timer gets to zero and the flashing "Don't Walk" sign goes back to "Walk."

My initial response was "WTF? Is the designer just fucking with the peds' minds?"

Since then, I ignore them.

about two weeks ago
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How interested are you in Virtual Reality tech?

bughunter Re:VR again? (202 comments)

If I could do that, I'd never leave the house...

about two weeks ago
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Geologists Warned of Washington State Mudslides For Decades

bughunter Re: Not much different than. (230 comments)

And when the levees break?

You'll have no place to stay?

Mama, you got to move?

Cryin' won't help you, prayin' won't do you no good.

about three weeks ago
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How interested are you in Virtual Reality tech?

bughunter Re:VR again? (202 comments)

Oh, we all know what the killer app is: the same one that vaulted the VCR and the internet to ubiquity.

But for VR, this app needs more than a pair of goggles...

about three weeks ago
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How interested are you in Virtual Reality tech?

bughunter Not an early adopter (202 comments)

I'll buy one after they work the kinks out and the prices come down.

I did my stint as an early adopter in the 90's. You younguns can pay the high prices to debug stuff that's rushed to market.

And with things like VR goggles, who knows what the kinks might be. (Anyone remember the Opti-grab?)

about three weeks ago
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NASA Puts Its New Spacesuit Design To a Public Vote

bughunter Re:Don't worry, no functional parts included (127 comments)

The "cover" or "skin" of the suit is also functional. As a systems engineer (for space-based sensors and cameras) I can think of a few requirements that need to be addressed right off the bat:

- Visible Contrast, so that the wearer can be detected/identified by humans, from a distance
- EM Reflectivity, so that the wearer can be detected/identified by active scan sensors (lidar/radar/whatever)
- Customization options, so that wearers can be distinguished from one another
- Glare reduction, so that the wearer's visibility isn't compromised under direct sunlight
- Thermal conductivity and albedo requirements, matched to the performance of the suit's internal thermal regulation
- Micrometeorite protection (probably addressed by deeper layers, but also a factor here)

And that's just from 2 minutes of brainstorming...

Of course, since this suit will never actually be used in space, the systems engineering process above can be abandoned in favor of public relations, which NASA spends a small but significant chunk of its budget on...

about three weeks ago
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I prefer my peppers ...

bughunter One burners only please... (285 comments)

I like my peppers lip numbing, nose running hot, but there are two kinds of chili peppers... one burner and two burners.

One burners burn your mouth. Two burners burn your mouth and your bum. (In the immortal words of Cheech Marin, "C'mon, ICE CREAM!")

Plus, as I get older, I find that if the seeds aren't removed from the chilis before they're used in a recipe, I suffer severe intestinal distress before it even has a chance to reach the exit. Therefore I make my own salsa and pico de gallo, or stick to known "safe" labels. (Huy Fong Sriracha, fortunately, is OK.)

Now get off my lawn, and leave the sriracha.

about three weeks ago
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L.A. Police: All Cars In L.A. Are Under Investigation

bughunter Re:Just validating registration tags ... (405 comments)

The LAPD would only need to state that the images were captured with the intent of validating registration tags.

But they're demonstrably not doing this.

They're buying ALPR systems that are specifically advertised with the capabilities to create and analyze databases of license plate numbers, places, times, etc. in order to track peoples' movements.

about three weeks ago
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Lies Programmers Tell Themselves

bughunter Re:Lame (452 comments)

Giving up mod privileges in this thread to gift you this knowledge:

Deslide is your friend. The bookmarklet works great.

Deslided version of TFA (spoiler: you're not missing much).

about a month ago
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Power Cables' UV Flashes Apparently Frighten Animals

bughunter Re:DC transmission lines? (183 comments)

50/60 Hz is pretty much DC anyway

LOL, clearly either a digital logic or RF engineer.

Tell ya what, if you're that confident, then take an aluminum crochet needle in each hand and jam them each in the +/– terminals of a 12 volt DC power supply, then in the line/neutral sockets of a variac output tuned down to 12V, and tell us again that 60 Hz is 'pretty much DC anyway.'

(Spoiler: one will be fatal and the other not.)

And then see if you can figure out why Westinghouse engineers chose the frequency at which electrical impulses best travel along human nerves as the standard power transmission frequency...

about a month ago
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Nanomaterial May Be Future of Hard Drives

bughunter Re:Call it what it is. (82 comments)

I got my chemical education in college.

I still see the trails sometimes...

about a month ago
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NASA Forgets How To Talk To ICE/ISEE-3 Spacecraft

bughunter Re:Wrong (166 comments)

Not contradictory at all.

You're conflating two layers of protocol: The encoding layer and the modulation scheme.

about a month and a half ago
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NASA Forgets How To Talk To ICE/ISEE-3 Spacecraft

bughunter Re:Never even estimated the cost (166 comments)

You meant that as a joke, but I've seen that happen...

about a month and a half ago

Submissions

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"Six Strikes" Copyright Alert System Debuts Today

bughunter bughunter writes  |  about a year ago

bughunter writes "After months of delay, the “Copyright Alert System,” (also known as “six strikes”) is ready for its “implementation phase.” Participating ISPs will be rolling out the system “over the course of the next several days.” According to TorrentFreak, Today the controversial “six-strikes” anti-piracy system kicks off in the United States. Soon the first BitTorrent users will receive so-called copyright alerts from their Internet provider and after multiple warnings subscribers will be punished. But, what these punishments entail remains a bit of a mystery. None of the participating ISPs have officially announced how they will treat repeat infringers and the CCI doesn’t have this information either. Is your ISP on the list of participating providers? Also, should casual, occasional users of BitTorrent who download this week's Breaking Bad or Game of Thrones be concerned, or is this primarily aimed at detecting large-scale copyright infringers?"
Link to Original Source
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ACTA Is Dead after EU Parliament Vote

bughunter bughunter writes  |  about 2 years ago

bughunter writes "Today at 12:56 CET, the European Parliament decided whether ACTA would be ultimately rejected or whether it would drag on into uncertainty. In a 478 to 39 vote, the Parliament decided to reject ACTA once and for all. This means that the deceptive treaty is now dead globally. Everyone in the European Parliament are taking turns to praise all the activists across Europe and the world for drawing their attention to what utter garbage this really was, not some run-of-the-mill rubberstamp paper, but actually a really dangerous piece of proposed legislation."
Link to Original Source
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ISPs to apply CCI's Six Strikes starting July 1

bughunter bughunter writes  |  about 2 years ago

bughunter writes "Starting July 1, the nation’s largest Internet service providers (ISPs) have agreed to adopt a “Graduated Response” program intended to cut down on illegal file sharing. The program, colloquially known as the “six-strikes” system, is the brainchild of the Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA) and the Motion Picture Association of America (MPAA). After six notices of infringement, the participating ISPs will take “mitigation measures,” which include bandwidth throttling (i.e. slowing down the accused subscriber’s connection), or even temporarily cutting off full Web browsing abilities. In cases where alleged infringement persists after the initial mitigation measure, the subscriber may face lawsuits from the copyright holder, and/or have their Internet access cut entirely. Those currently on board include AT&T, Cablevison, Comcast, Time Warner Cable, and Verizon."
Link to Original Source
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The New York Times' Kitchen Table of the Future

bughunter bughunter writes  |  more than 2 years ago

bughunter writes "Matt Boggie, The Times Co.'s Media & Technology Strategist for R&D, demonstrates the Times' screen-top version of a kitchen table. It's based on Microsoft's Surface technology, modified by the Times' R&D Lab to create a Times-oriented user experience that reimagines the old "around the breakfast table" reading of the paper. The prototypes on display at the R&D Lab consider how news can be used, in particular, in the home, woven into the intimate contexts of the morning coffee."
Link to Original Source
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Rep. Anthony Weiner Framed via Yfrog Security Flaw

bughunter bughunter writes  |  more than 2 years ago

" rel="nofollow">bughunter writes "According to evidence collected by blogger Joseph Cannon, Representative Anthony Weiner (D-NY) was the victim of a framing attempt using the Yfrog photo hosting service. Tipped off by EXIF data inconsistencies, Cannon began investigating possible explanations, and discovered that using an email trick, images can be inserted into a Yfrog user’s collection without their knowledge. Cannon also examines other evidence, direct and circumstantial, that points to the “discoverer” of the alleged lewd Tweet by Weiner as the one who planted the fraudulent photo. Says Cannon, “The framer did not hack into Weiner's account. There was no need for hacking. The framer used a much simpler, more ingenious scheme, involving a design flaw in the architecture of the application.”"
Link to Original Source
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Saturday is National Gaming Day at Your Library

bughunter bughunter writes  |  more than 3 years ago

bughunter writes "On November 13, 2010, libraries across the country will participate in National Gaming Day 2010: the largest, simultaneous national video game tournament ever held! Kids (and their parents) will be able to compete against players at other libraries and track their scores while playing at their local library. In addition, libraries will be offering a variety of board games for all ages to play together. I know I'll be taking my six-year-old son, whose Mom has vetoed every suggestion to buy a console... for good reason. But until she relents, she'll at least give up one Saturday morning each November."
Link to Original Source
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Help Me Introduce a Non-geek to SF

bughunter bughunter writes  |  more than 3 years ago

bughunter writes "I'm having trouble identifying a novel that would interest my wife in science fiction. I've tried a couple of times to introduce her to the genre, without success. She's mildly curious as to why I'm interested in it, and why I aspire to writing it. But she holds quite a few misconceptions about it, probably due to the horrible examples set by SF movies and TV series. I still think that no one has ever shown her a good example of the genre, not even me.

She seems to have been under the impression for a long time that "SciFi" was about aliens, space ships, and ray guns... that the only appeal of the genre was the nerdier analogue of a penchant for spaghetti westerns or monster movies. And she's not interested in classical space opera at all.

I've tried to explain the concept of hard SF and how it differs from science fantasy or space opera. I'm not emphasizing the scientific rigor and plausibility of hard SF as much as I want to demonstrate how its depend on scientific speculation or mysteries. Not many SF films have conflicts and key plot elements that are built upon scientific or technical propositions (as opposed to using enabling devices that are sheer fantasies, like Stargate). I have used the few that exist as examples, for instance "What if humans encountered an active artifact of an advanced civilization?" [2001: a Space Odyssey] or "Is a machine consciousness any different from a human one?" [Blade Runner].

I've given her a couple of SF novels that she's attempted to but she quickly lost interest. I thought that she might enjoy Neal Stephenson, so I gave her what I thought was one of his more approachable novels: Zodiac. But she found the main character, Sangamon Taylor, too arrogant to identify with. I really enjoy Bruce Sterling, and thought that she could handle Distraction, but she wasn't interested in it at all. Perhaps I should have tried Islands in the Net, instead.

After this, why am I persisting? Well, she frequently complains she has nothing to read, and I have a huge library of SF novels, mostly boxed up. And she says she's interested in my interests, that she wants to understand them. Perhaps I'm taking her too literally, and that she just wants to hear me explain it, to see me express my passion for it. But for now, I'm still interpreting her to mean that she'd like to try reading SF. She claims to have really enjoyed Carmac's The Road, but from what I can gather, that's more about the characters and not really SF.

Lately I've been reading all the New British Space Operas I can get my hands on: Hamilton, Reynolds, Banks, etc. I'm considering something like The Player of Games or Use of Weapons, but I'm afraid that Banks' post-scarcity milieu might be just too exotic for her. Maybe something more pulp, like Altered Carbon, or more classic but still rigorous like Footfall? I'm also considering things like Heinlein's Stranger in a Strange Land, or Card's Ender's Game. I suspect that she's probably more receptive to the soft science fiction or social science fiction subgenres than I am, but I haven't explored them very deeply so I'm at a loss for good examples.

I really want to demonstrate to her that science fiction is more than a horse opera set in space. I'd like to be able to demonstrate that SF is a serious branch of literature that employs scientific premises or plausible technology advances to create plots and conflicts that just can't be translated to other genres. Is that even possible? Is the idea of literature as "thought experiment" just too self-indulgent? What are good examples that would appeal to someone who reads Anna Karenina and The Snowball?"
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Should I Be Afraid of "Smart" Electricity Metering

bughunter bughunter writes  |  more than 4 years ago

bughunter writes "Last week, Southern California Edison included a notice in my bill announcing that SCE would be installing "SmartConnect" electricity meters in my neighborhood. After reading SCE's PR blurbs about the 'advantages' of the system, I'm not sure I want it. Color me skeptic, but SmartConnect seems to be primarily a way to charge me more for daytime use, and to turn my power off on a moment's notice. The benefits to the subscriber claimed by SCE sound more like marketing spin on the new abilities granted to the utility. Here is more information about the program, and more information about the meters. How many slashdotters already have this type of meter? What are your experiences with it?"
Link to Original Source
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Systems Engineer: The Best Job in America

bughunter bughunter writes  |  more than 4 years ago

bughunter writes "According to CNN/Money — which ranked 50 jobs for 2009 according to Salary, Demand, and Quality of Life — Systems Engineer came out as number one because, 'Pay can easily hit six figures for top performers, and there's ample opportunity for advancement.' (Note that lack of stress was not cited.) It's especially nice to see Engineering get some recognition as a rewarding career. Eleven of the Top 50 Jobs are engineering or IT related, with IT Project Manager and Computer/Network Security Consultant sharing the top 10. I really love my job. As a systems engineer with 21 years of experience working for NASA and aerospace firms, I get involved early in the concept phase of new projects, and I've helped determine how some really cool stuff happened, from atmospheric science, to innovative UAVs, and commercial space launches. And I did it all with a Bachelor's Degree. Engineering Rocks."
Link to Original Source
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Habitable Planet Discovery Expected "Anytime Now"

bughunter bughunter writes  |  more than 4 years ago

bughunter writes "Planet hunters from NASA, Harvard University and the University of Colorado are collaborating on an effort to find Earthlike planets orbiting other stars. David Latham, from the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, is quoted at saying, "It could happen almost any time now. We now have the technological capability to identify Earth-like planets around the smallest stars." Using the COROT and HARPS observatories, they expect to soon find our first candidates for extrasolar colonization. Now all we need is a Bussard Ramjet and a few volunteers."
Link to Original Source
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Senate to Reconsider Wiretap Immunity

bughunter bughunter writes  |  more than 4 years ago

bughunter writes "According to Wired Threat Level, "Lawmakers are considering key changes to the Patriot Act and other spy laws — proposals that could give new life to lawsuits accusing the nation's telecommunications companies of turning over Americans' electronic communications to the government without warrants. On Oct. 1, the Senate Judiciary Committee likely will consider revoking that immunity legislation as it works to revise the Patriot Act and other spy laws with radical changes that provide for more government transparency and more privacy protections." This is big. Now would be a great time to donate $20 to the EFF, since it appears they will be heading back to court on our behalf."
Link to Original Source
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Why is Metamoderation Broken?

bughunter bughunter writes  |  more than 4 years ago

bughunter writes "For the past two days, the same posts are given to me when I go to metamoderate, and they all retain my past metamoderation choices. This persists even when I switch to a different browser on a different computer, so it ain't me."
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First Flight of Powered Flapping Wing Vehicle

bughunter bughunter writes  |  more than 4 years ago

bughunter writes "Pioneers in autonomous, solar-powered and human-powered aviation, Aerovironment, Inc. (AV) has accomplished another first: the controlled hovering flight of an air vehicle system with two flapping wings, using only the flapping wings for propulsion and control while carrying its own power source. (More information and video here.) Employing biomimetics at an extremely small scale, this nano air vehicle (NAV) is ultimately intended to provide new military reconnaissance capabilities in urban environments. The "Mercury" R/C test vehicle is capable of climbing and descending vertically, flying sideways left and right, as well as forward and backward, for a duration of 20 seconds. The NAV program was initiated by DARPA to develop a new class of air vehicles capable of indoor and outdoor operation. In response to this success, DARPA has awarded AV a Phase II contract, which will focus on improving the NAV's endurance and performance."
Link to Original Source
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New Mac Clone Maker 'Quo' to Open CA Retail Store

bughunter bughunter writes  |  more than 4 years ago

bughunter writes "Cnet is reporting that Mac clone maker Quo Computer plans to open its first retail location, selling Mac clones, on June 1. To start, Quo will offer three desktop systems: the Life Q, Pro Q, and Max Q. While details of the components are not yet available, De Silva said they are looking at Apple's system configurations for guidance. Pricing has also not been finalized on the desktop machines, but the company is looking to start pricing at less than $900. While Quo is starting off with the desktop machines, De Silva said it is looking at offering an Apple TV-like media server and a smaller computer similar to the Mac Mini. Plans on those systems have not been finalized. The Quo Web site is being worked on now and is set to launch next week. The retail store, located at 2401 West Main Street, Alhambra, Calif., will open for business on June 1."
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Linden Lab to Crack Down on Adult Content?

bughunter bughunter writes  |  more than 5 years ago

bughunter writes "According to Second Life Update, the Second Life administration is planning to clean up its virtual world. 'Linden Lab lab announced today in their blog a huge crackdown on adult content in Second Life. If you remember the outlawing of gambling in Second Life, crackdown on advertising in Second Life, or the new virtual land restrictions then this may not come as a surprise change for the virtual world.' Darn, I procrastinated, and now it's too late to start roleplaying a callipygous zoomorphic nymphomaniac."
Link to Original Source
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Nvidia Fires Back at Intel, Drops Via's Name

bughunter bughunter writes  |  more than 5 years ago

bughunter writes "'Today, Nvidia fired back with arguments of why Ion is the best solution for the Atom.' That's from the Tom's Hardware lede, but the quote from my boss is more entertaining:

Now Nvidia comes back with a point for point response. I have to say this is quite entertaining for a geek like me. Intel only looked at the worst case numbers with the CPU and GPU drawing peak power continuously. Nvidia points this out and shows that under nominal conditions the ION platform that is more powerful only draws a half watt more. Then as a zinger Nvidia suggests that the ION platform can be accomplished just as well with a VIA processor in place of the Atom. Kapow! This is the "Days of our Lives" equivalent for tech nuts.

We've got an application for Ion right now... I wish they'd kiss and make up already."
Link to Original Source

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Will Orbiting Carbon Observatory find missing CO2?

bughunter bughunter writes  |  more than 5 years ago

bughunter writes "The Orbiting Carbon Observatory (OCO) is slated for launch tomorrow, February 24, 2009. OCO is the first earth science observatory that will create a detailed map of atmospheric carbon dioxide sources and sinks around the globe. And not a moment too late. Popular Mechanics has an accurate, concise article on the science that this mission will perform, and how it fits in with the existing "A-train" of polar-orbiting earth observatories. JPL's page goes into more detail. And NASA's OCO Launch Blog will have continuous updates as liftoff approaches and the spacecraft reports in and checks out from 700km up."
Link to Original Source
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UK Porn Filesharers Get RIAA Treatment

bughunter bughunter writes  |  more than 5 years ago

bughunter writes "Thousands of internet users have been told they'll be taken to court unless they pay hundreds of pounds for illegally downloading and sharing hardcore porn movies. This Newsbeat story describes how people across the UK have been accused of using file-sharing networks to get hold of dozens of adult titles without paying for them. A German company called DigiProtect claims the users are breaking copyright law and is demanding £500 to settle out of court. Many recipients of DigiProtect's 20-page legal letter deny copying the movies and say they have no idea why they were identified in the first place. TorrentFreak appears to have identified this activity as early as November 18 (potentially NSFW URLs on target page)."
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Most Business-Launched Virtual Worlds Fail

bughunter bughunter writes  |  more than 5 years ago

bughunter writes "Internet consultant firm Gartner claims that only 1 in 10 commercial virtual worlds succeeds, and most fail within 18 months

"Businesses have learned some hard lessons," Gartner analyst Steve Prentice said in a statement released Thursday. "They need to realize that virtual worlds mark the transition from Web pages to Web places and a successful virtual presence starts with people, not physics. Realistic graphics and physical behavior count for little unless the presence is valued by and engaging to a large audience."
Nonethless, Gartner advises businesses to keep trying. Virtual worlds can add value initially to training and simulation exercises, and suggests it will eventually provide a venue for more mundane collaboration."

Link to Original Source
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War of the Future: Robot vs. Robot

bughunter bughunter writes  |  more than 5 years ago

bughunter writes "This spring, it seems everyone is publishing breathless fearmongering stories of killer robots run amok, but this story is a refreshingly insightful treatment of unmanned warfare. While it doesn't go into depth, The Star does accurately represent the technical limitations, challenges, and the paths being blazed by Unmanned Systems companies. Sensor data fusion, personal equipment, force protection and civilian awareness are the current focus of Unmanned Aerial Vehicle and Unmanned Ground Vehicle development, in the UK as well as at my company in the US and also abroad.

"It is a weird extrapolation, the idea that war is becoming a scenario of `Your robots versus our robots,' Why not just fight it out on a video game instead?" said Mindsheet's Tribe. "But this is where things are moving."
Yes, we played Starcraft in our spare time, too. But credit goes to Orson Scott Card, who saw this coming over thirty years ago."

Link to Original Source

Journals

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Donate to the EFF

bughunter bughunter writes  |  about 5 years ago

So Obama is "Worse than Bush" with respect to Warrantless Wiretapping. Well, it's not like we didn't see this coming.

edit 9/24/09: It appears that the Senate Judiciary Committee will be looking again at telco immunity and executive wiretapping authority. The EFF hires lobbyists, too, and needs your support to take advantage of this opportunity.

If you're not yet a member, please go now to the EFF support page and make a contribution.

If there's one nonprofit you can trust to use your money in your interest, its EFF. If you have money to make only one donation this year, please make it the EFF. If you donated to the Obama for America campaign, and now object to what he's doing with respect to warrantless wiretapping, torture memos, or even Wall Street, donate to the EFF to restore your conscience, karmic balance or service to liberty (take your pick, choices are nonexclusive).

Addendum: I don't regret voting for him, but he hasn't received a dime from me since his July 2008 Senate vote, and he won't until he upholds the 4th Amendment.

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