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Research Highlights How AI Sees and How It Knows What It's Looking At

bunratty Re:This synopsis (125 comments)

Well, if you have the idea of a rocket, yes you can put the parts together and make a rocket. But no one has an idea of how to make a working general artificial intelligence. That's the leap. What are the parts we need? How do we put them together? No one has a clue! If you know how to do it, write it up in a thesis, collect your PhD, and make billions.

2 days ago
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Research Highlights How AI Sees and How It Knows What It's Looking At

bunratty Re:This synopsis (125 comments)

There's a tremendous gap between the "AI" that researchers are working on and and artificial general intelligence. The algorithms used in AI systems are almost always very simple. These algorithms are simply not going to make this leap and become what we would consider intelligent. It's like expecting Google search to suddenly gain sentience. My favorite quote about this is "Believing that writing these types of programs will bring us closer to real artificial intelligence is like believing that someone climbing a tree is making progress toward reaching the moon."

2 days ago
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AI Expert: AI Won't Exterminate Us -- It Will Empower Us

bunratty Re:So say there AI machines ? (415 comments)

Not for quite a while. As someone who has worked in robotics, I would say the scenario for the next several decades would resemble XKCD's What-If on the robot apocalypse.

about two weeks ago
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High Temperature Superconductivity Record Smashed By Sulfur Hydride

bunratty Re:Scientists? (80 comments)

A scientist, like any person, can say anything they want. You shouldn't believe something a scientist says just because they say it. They have opinions and can be wrong just like everyone can. I'm sure some scientists say ghosts exist and others say they don't.

Science, on the other hand, can find no evidence of ghosts. That doesn't mean they don't exist, however. Science makes no statement one way or the other on the subject of ghosts. They have never been observed, as far as we know, but could still exist.

about two weeks ago
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Do you worry about the singularity?

bunratty Re:No, it's not even possible (181 comments)

No matter how conductive cooling fins are, you need a certain amount of surface area to get the heat away from the processor. You may be able to pack a quadrillion transistors into a cubic centimeter, but if they use 2 MW of power, even cooling fins that fill a cubic meter will not be sufficient to cool it.

about two weeks ago
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New Virus Means Deadlier Flu Season Is Possible

bunratty Re:Boy who cried wolf (163 comments)

Where do you get this "end of the world" thing? As for the claim of "alarmism", do you not remember the flu strain several years ago that tended to kill healthy people in the prime of their life, rather than "immunocompromised hosts"?

It's not that the reports are "alarmist". It's (1) you're not understanding the actual risk, and (2) you're pretending that the reports are predicting the end of the world.

about two weeks ago
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Aliens Are Probably Everywhere, Just Not Anywhere Nearby

bunratty Re:Birthday paradox? (334 comments)

Well, that's a different way of stating the birthday paradox, but it's still not what the article is about.

about two weeks ago
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Aliens Are Probably Everywhere, Just Not Anywhere Nearby

bunratty Re:Birthday paradox? (334 comments)

The birthday paradox would mean that even if planets with intelligent life are an average of thousands of light years from the nearest alien planet with intelligent life, the likelihood of one pair of planets with intelligent life existing much closer together than that is high. Those two planets would be like the two people who share a birthday in the paradox. That's a completely different idea than this article is about.

about two weeks ago
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New Effort To Grant Legal Rights To Chimpanzees Fails

bunratty Re:Free from captivity... for how long? (341 comments)

Good point. Maybe he could be considered mentally incompetent and placed in a non-jail institution. I think a zoo could be nice, but if he's considered a legal person, that's probably considered cruelty. If he's considered a person, we also wouldn't able to let him live in the wild, I think. Casting a person out into the wild would be considered cruel, too. I'm all for treating animals nicely, but granting legal personhood doesn't seem like the way to go about it. I think it would be more productive to treat mentally ill and mentally defective people better instead. And maybe also allow people who are suffering to end their lives the way they wish.

about two weeks ago
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Do you worry about the singularity?

bunratty Re:No, it's not even possible (181 comments)

Going into the 3rd dimension will mean even less surface area per transistor for heat to escape. We're not going to be able to pack millions more transistors per unit volume than we can now by stacking processor boards and putting cooling units between them, unless we can get the power consumption per transistor down by a factor of thousands without shrinking the transistors. It's theoretically possible, given our current knowledge of physics, but engineering such a system might take a while...

about two weeks ago
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The Cost of the "S" In HTTPS

bunratty Re:Use COPPA as an excuse not to encrypt (238 comments)

I would say that any site that allows downloads of executable content also needs HTTPS. Otherwise, a middleman could install malware in your downloads nearly as easily as they could see your passwords.

about two weeks ago
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The Cost of the "S" In HTTPS

bunratty Re:Cost of certificates (238 comments)

You can get SSL certificates for free, but they're WAY more difficult to use than they need to be. I've installed certificates before, and it's a bunch of tedious, boring, repetitive work. What are computers for but to automate tedious, boring, repetitive work!? The computer should handle all work for me, and all I should have to do is click a button, for chrissake! That's what Let's Encrypt does.

about two weeks ago
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The Cost of the "S" In HTTPS

bunratty Re:Drop HTTP completely? (238 comments)

There isn't such an extension already? If there isn't, someone should write one or alter an existing one to add that functionality, at least as an option. Then people should try it and let us know how painful it actually is to use. My guess would be: extremely painful for most users for the next several years, so painful that hardly anyone would use it willingly. Maybe some businesses could force it on their employees.

about two weeks ago
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The Cost of the "S" In HTTPS

bunratty Re:Drop HTTP completely? (238 comments)

The problem with HTTP is that a middleman can see and alter content. If a browser doesn't warn when it encounters a self-signed certificate, then HTTPS would be no more secure than HTTP -- all the middleman has to do is use a self-signed certificate to decrypt/encrypt packets as needed. So browsers do prefer HTTPS, when the certificate can be verified. If you're using HTTPS and the certificate can't be verified, it's no more secure than HTTP unless the user is warned, and in fact it's a way of detecting that a middleman may be present. That's the whole reason for the death warning!

about two weeks ago
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The Cost of the "S" In HTTPS

bunratty Cost of certificates (238 comments)

The other cost of the S is the difficulty in obtaining and using certificates that are recognized by browsers without bothering the user. That's why the Let's Encrypt project is trying to make it free and easy.

about two weeks ago
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Do you worry about the singularity?

bunratty Re:My Take (181 comments)

I still think it's worse than that. I think we will sooner be able to clone humans reliably and perform brain-content transfers between clones or between a real brain and a simulated brain before we'll be able to reverse-engineer the brain or otherwise construct an artificial intelligence that isn't just a copy or near-copy of a brain. So practical immortality will come before artificial general intelligence, too.

about two weeks ago
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Do you worry about the singularity?

bunratty Re:My Take (181 comments)

Yes, you understand exactly!

But climbing higher in the tree will never get you to the moon. Programs that do better than humans in one particular area will not develop to the point that they have general intelligence. They'll be idiot savants, great at one specific thing to the point of being better than any human (like playing chess or Jeopardy, driving a car, performing surgery, or even writing a symphony), but a complete idiot at everything else.

I also think these programs will never get as good as the best humans at certain activities, like doing significant novel scientific research, proving hard math theorems, doing general programming, or translating languages. Certain activities do require general intelligence, not just one narrow specialty.

about two weeks ago
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Gangnam Style Surpasses YouTube's 32-bit View Counter

bunratty Re:numbering (164 comments)

Uh, well how do you incrementally add 1 to "thousands" and wind up at "tens of thousands" at some point? Randomly?

Or did you mean count up to 2 billion, at which point you report billions and billions served and stop incrementing?

about two weeks ago
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Do you worry about the singularity?

bunratty Re:My Take (181 comments)

I think the situation is worse than that. Not only do we not have anything approaching a decent understanding of how actual intelligence works, it's probably way too complicated for a human to understand. Perhaps we could construct a computer system that could in some sense "understand" how the brain works, and it could design a better brain. That better brain could in turn build a better computer system, ad singularity. Actually I never thought of that approach before.

But does an agent have to understand how to make a thing before a thing can come into existence? Biological and AI research has shown that this is not the case.

about two weeks ago

Submissions

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How well do our climate models match our observations?

bunratty bunratty writes  |  about 10 months ago

bunratty (545641) writes "According to recent articles by Roy Spencer and John Christy, our climate models have done a poor job of predicting warming due to humans burning fossil fuels. They claim that we've observed only a fraction of the warming they predict. But when I look at the source they claim to use, the State of the Climate in 2012, I see that it shows a warming of 0.7 degrees Celsius worldwide since 1980, close to the 0.8 degrees Celsius warming predicted by the climate models. Take a look at the data for yourself. How well do our predictions match our observations?"
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Firefox 3 Beta 5 Released

bunratty bunratty writes  |  more than 6 years ago

bunratty (545641) writes "Firefox 3 Beta 5 was released today. This last beta release sports performance-boosting improved connection parallelism. Not only has "the memory leak" been fixed: Firefox now uses less memory than other browsers according to Mozilla developers as well as CyberNet and The Browser World. As for the Acid3 test, Firefox 3 Beta 5 scores only 71/100 compared to 75/100 for Safari 3.1 and 79/100 for the latest Opera 9.5 snapshot. The final release of Firefox 3 is expected in June."

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