×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

Comments

top

Lytro Illum Light-Field Camera Lets You Refocus Pictures Later

bws111 Re:Meh (107 comments)

Ever hear of Sports Illustrated? They have thousands of photos of sporting events, in perfect focus and shallow DOF.

9 hours ago
top

Lytro Illum Light-Field Camera Lets You Refocus Pictures Later

bws111 Re:Meh (107 comments)

You seem to be confusing lenses and filters. Lenses are not used to 'apply distortions' (although a side effect of many lenses is distortion). Lenses are used to control what fills the frame of the picture.

I'll give you an example. Suppose you are on the sidelines at a football game, and want to take some pictures. One picture might be of what your eye sees - a good portion of the stands on the other side of the field, grass between you and the players, and the players. A better picture may be of only the player controlling the ball. A different picture may want to show mostly the stands, to show the size of the crowd.

A point and shoot camera, or a camera with a 'normal' lens is going to take the first picture. A telephoto lens would take the second picture (you could zoom in and get just the players face, including the sweat dripping from his hair), and a wide angle lens would take the third picture.

Now, why can't this camera elimate those lenses? Well, suppose you have a 10MP camera. In the wide-angle shot, the players face probably takes up .1% of the frame. If you are using all 10MP to capture the wide angle shot, your players face only uses about 10K of the pixels. If you try to blow the players face up to full-frame you have an extremely blocky picture with no detail at all. On the other hand, if you want to the players face to occupy 10MP, you need to capture 10 GIGA pixels in your wide angle shot.

yesterday
top

NYC's 19th-Century Horse Carriages Spawn Weird, Truck-Size Electric Car

bws111 Re:Stupid? (199 comments)

You know, lots of people also die doing something they enjoy (like running.) Does that mean they purposely killed themselves or were forced to do the activity? No, of course not.

yesterday
top

NYC's 19th-Century Horse Carriages Spawn Weird, Truck-Size Electric Car

bws111 Re:Stupid? (199 comments)

Yes, that is what I meant.

yesterday
top

NYC's 19th-Century Horse Carriages Spawn Weird, Truck-Size Electric Car

bws111 Re:Tacky solution. (199 comments)

It's not 'ironic' at all. In a city that is old, it is novel to have something sleek and futuristic. In a city that is new, it is novel to have something antique. Not really that hard to figure out.

It's big and heavy because it is a prototype, built out of other existing things. Again, not that hard to figure out.

yesterday
top

NYC's 19th-Century Horse Carriages Spawn Weird, Truck-Size Electric Car

bws111 Re:Stupid? (199 comments)

In addition to your economic reasons one must also consider what the horses are doing - giving romantic rides to tourists. There is nothing romantic about a sick, dying, or mistreated horse, so it is certainly in their best interest to not have those conditions.

2 days ago
top

Google's New Camera App Simulates Shallow Depth of Field

bws111 Re:Better idea: Improve cell phone camera lenses. (126 comments)

You need more than a good lens. You need a bigger sensor, and more distance between lens and sensor. And that ain't gonna happen in a phone whoe goal is to be thin and lightweight.

3 days ago
top

Google's New Camera App Simulates Shallow Depth of Field

bws111 Re:Call me a rock wielding barbarian (126 comments)

Interesting that you use the phrase 'window upon the world.' Ever look through a real window with an insect screen on it? Now imagine that instead of clearly seeing the house across the street, what you see is the house with a neat grid in sharp focus upon it. That is what you are asking for.

A photo where everything is in equally sharp focus is absolutely not what your eyes see, unless you are standing on a cliff and seeing only things that are far away.

In real life your window upon the world would only have a very small area in sharp focus.

3 days ago
top

Beer Price Crisis On the Horizon

bws111 Re:Bullshit (396 comments)

Where do you live that at commercial operation can get rid of waste for free? Where I live, the (government set) 'tipping fee' is $103/ton. That does not include the cost of someone collecting the waste. So the 'maximum impact' is probably north of $150/ton.

3 days ago
top

Mathematicians Devise Typefaces Based On Problems of Computational Geometry

bws111 Re:Question answered (60 comments)

True, but I would say that was created by Knuth in the role of artist, not mathematician.

4 days ago
top

Mathematicians Devise Typefaces Based On Problems of Computational Geometry

bws111 Question answered (60 comments)

Well, at least now we know why typefaces are designed by artists and not mathematicians.

4 days ago
top

SSD-HDD Price Gap Won't Go Away Anytime Soon

bws111 Re:not really (256 comments)

Where are you getting those prices? A quick check of newegg found the cheapest ssd at $160 for 240GB ($0.67/GB). On the other hand, a 10K RPM 1TB disk costs $200 ($0.20/GB). Are you comparing the cheapest consumer ssd to the most expensive enterprise hard disk?

5 days ago
top

Switching From Sitting To Standing At Your Desk

bws111 Re:victorian clerks.. (311 comments)

I think you're over thinking this. Executive, Manager, and Secretary are just the names for styles of chairs, not some kind of hierarchy or (current) intended use.

Secretary chairs, I believe, are not named for the person currently known as an administrative assistant, but for the piece of furniture called a secretary. A secretary is a tall cabinet, the lower part is drawers, the upper part has glassed doors to display knick-knacks, china, whatever, and in between is a fold-down panel that makes a desk. This piece of furniture would be prominent in a house. When a person wanted to write a letter, etc, they would drag a small, lightweight stool to the secretary and fold down the desk.

In the days when most people worked in factories, the only person with a desk was the manager. Hence, a 'manager' chair is basically any desk chair.

The executive chair is mostly to show that the person sitting in it is important, hence the leather.

5 days ago
top

Pollution In China Could Be Driving Freak Weather In US

bws111 Re:Polution tax (157 comments)

Say what? Median household income in the US is $51K. The poverty line for a family is about $2K/month, and 15% of the people are below that. There is no support at all for your claim that 'most families' in the US live on $1000/month.

about a week ago
top

Fifty Years Ago IBM 'Bet the Company' On the 360 Series Mainframe

bws111 Re:stack instructions? (169 comments)

There are no push/pull instructions. There have been 'program call' and 'program return' instructions since the 80's, but these are complex instructions used for switching between addressing modes, address spaces, etc. Just the description of how they work takes almost 17 pages in the POP.

about two weeks ago
top

Fifty Years Ago IBM 'Bet the Company' On the 360 Series Mainframe

bws111 Re:Virtual Machines (169 comments)

Trust me, I know infinitely more about it than you do.

You said 'because of capacity on demand...'. This is, in fact, false. The thing that lets them control the performance and configuration of the machine is not 'capacity on demand', it is 'Licensed Internal Code Controlled Configuration.' The use of LIC CC also allows them to offer 'capacity on demand', but they are not the same thing, and LIC CC does not require COD. Also, notice the name of that facility, it should give you a clue as to what is actually licensed.

Having said that, I already explained why multiple performance levels are offered. Why would you pay (for hardware and software) for more performance than you need?

about two weeks ago
top

Fifty Years Ago IBM 'Bet the Company' On the 360 Series Mainframe

bws111 Re:Virtual Machines (169 comments)

You have no idea what you are talking about. "Capacity on demand" has nothing to do with why a BC would run at 1/100 it's capacity (and there is no such thing as a 'base' model.)

In the mainframe world software is often priced by the capacity of the machine it is running on. Therefore, a customer who does not require speed can save significant money by ordering a machine that has had it's capacity reduced. That saves money on both the hardware and software.

One of the reasons IBM does not license z/OS to run on Hercules is because it breaks that pricing method. How would IBM and/or ISVs price their software, when the performance of the machine it is running on is completely unknown and changable? The other reason they won't license is z/OS is because Hercules infringes several of it's patents.

about two weeks ago
top

Fifty Years Ago IBM 'Bet the Company' On the 360 Series Mainframe

bws111 Re:software (169 comments)

What are you talking about? What the heck is 'native mainframe tech'? z/OS? By that logic, x86 is also 'dying' because servers are moving from Windows to Linux. In 2012 IBM sold more mainframes, as measured in units, capacity, and dollars, than at any point in it's history. Over half of the capacity was in the form of 'new workload' engines. In other words, the market grew, not shrank.

And what do you mean by 'taking perfomance seriously again'? There has never been a time when they didn't take performance seriously. Mainframes have been on an 18-24 month release cycle for decades, and every new machine has been significantly faster than the previous generation. The only time this wasn't true was in the mid-90s, when IBM changed the technology from bipolar TTL to CMOS microprocessors. That change wasn't because they didn't care about performance, but because customers no longer wanted machines that cost $40M and took up an entire room and used enough energy to power a small town. CMOS technology finally caught up to the performance of the old bipolar machines around 2000.

about two weeks ago
top

Fifty Years Ago IBM 'Bet the Company' On the 360 Series Mainframe

bws111 Re:software (169 comments)

What computer do you consider 'more modern' than an IBM EC12? What makes you think the technology in mainframes is 'dying'?

about two weeks ago
top

Details You're Not Supposed To See From Boston U's Patent Settlements

bws111 Re:Prior Art (130 comments)

Instead of relying on Wikipedia, why don't you try reading the actual patents (which you obviously have not done)?

The wikipedia entry says nothing about either Mr Nakamura's or Boston University's work in relation to these two patents (Mr Nakamura US 5290393, Boston University US 5686738). The patents are about how to grow the semiconductors, not simply what material they are made of. And those two methods of growing are, wait for it, different. Mr Nakamura grows the layers 'at at temperature of 900 to 1150.' Boston U grows it 'at a temperature of 600 in a nitrogen plasma'. This allows for a purer lattice without nitrogen vacancies.

about three weeks ago

Submissions

bws111 hasn't submitted any stories.

Journals

bws111 has no journal entries.

Slashdot Account

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?

Don't worry, we never post anything without your permission.

Submission Text Formatting Tips

We support a small subset of HTML, namely these tags:

  • b
  • i
  • p
  • br
  • a
  • ol
  • ul
  • li
  • dl
  • dt
  • dd
  • em
  • strong
  • tt
  • blockquote
  • div
  • quote
  • ecode

"ecode" can be used for code snippets, for example:

<ecode>    while(1) { do_something(); } </ecode>
Sign up for Slashdot Newsletters
Create a Slashdot Account

Loading...