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UK Government Backs Three-Person IVF

c6gunner Re:easy non-controversial fix (132 comments)

Well, if you are willing to take on the establishment and tell 1/2 the population (women) that it isn't their body and it is the government that is control of their reproductive systems and whether or not they are allowed to have children then go for it. Effectively, that is what you are saying.

O_o

I think you forgot to call me Hitler ....

Just like China has determined that women should only have 1 child, you are saying that the government should dictate that women should only have children that meet certain requirements.

Ah, ok. Yeah, Mao is just as good ....

about 10 months ago
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UK Government Backs Three-Person IVF

c6gunner Re:easy non-controversial fix (132 comments)

It's not an either or situation. If you have a disabled child, you are not denying a healthy child.

Oh, but it is, and you are.

Most people will only have a set number of children in their lifetime. For the majority in the western world, that's somewhere between 1 and 3. If you have one disabled child, and you were only planning on having 2 kids, you're unlikely to now change your mind and have 3.

Additionally, depending on the exact medical condition, a deformed child may impede your ability to have further children. You may have been planning on having 2 kids, but due to the added attention and cost associated with a handicapped child, you find yourself unable to afford any further children. So instead of 2 healthy children, you end up with one who is disabled.

Either way it doesn't seem like a good trade, to me.

As you seem to be arguing so strenuously, it is a very personal issue that unless you are directly involved with it you cannot begin to make that choice for somebody else.

The decision to become a heroin addict is a deeply personal one also, yet we seem to have no difficulty legislating against it. Even if you could successfully argue that "personal issues" should not be legislated, that still doesn't mean we can't do ANYTHING about it. At the very least we can make sure that people are educated on the issue, and are given the information and advice needed to make the right decision.

about 10 months ago
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Researchers Create New Cheap, Shatterproof, Plastic Light Bulbs

c6gunner Re:Too late, LEDs are here. (296 comments)

If I remember right, DC loses more power than AC on wire runs & has a higher shock risk.

You got that completely backwards - AC loses more power than DC on wire runs. That's one of the reasons why the massive very-long-distance lines tend to be DC. I'm not sure about the shock risk, but I don't think it matters much anyway. The biggest issue is that A/C is very easy and cheap to "step down" to lower voltages, whereas it was extremely difficult to do for DC until just recently, and it's still pretty expensive.

Your USB idea is interesting. I guess you could have a hub in the ceiling of each room, powered by the regular A/C current, then run regular USB cables from that to all lights, and a couple slots on each A/C outlet for other devices. If you connect all the hubs together, it would be awesome for a "Smart Home" - have a server in the basement that controls all your lighting and smart appliances, while acting as a media center and storage for your portable devices. It would be a niche market at the moment, but I could see it becoming more popular in the future. Of course, by then it will probably be a completely different standard anyway ...

about a year ago
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Murder Is Like a Disease (No, Really)

c6gunner Re:Most human problems result from human behavior (299 comments)

So when experts and professionals in their fields say HFCS is a danger, they are quacks, but when the industry says it's perfectly safe, they are to be believed. It's a damned good thing people didn't take "safe" for an answer where tobacco was concerned. The similarities are obvious including all the crank doctors out there making unsubstantiated claims about the harms of smoking.

Sure, the similarities are obvious. As are the similarities between anti-tobacco and the anti-vaccine lunatics. Hell, who needs science, right? All we need is a small group arguing with a big group! Clearly the small guys are always right!

Please.

Even the creationists have their "professionals". Pick any bunch of half baked fucktards, and they'll have at least a handful of "professionals" to give them that air of legitimacy. They're still idiots. What matters is what the science shows. The reason we know that tobacco is harmful is because that's where the evidence led us. Billions of dollars paid by tobacco industries didn't make any fucking difference, other than creating a controversy for a little while. For those of us who care about what's true, shit like that makes no difference - where the evidence leads, we follow.

For example, the FDA approved aspartame. But only after Dick Cheney .. blah blah blah

Yeah, look, I don't care. If your evidence consists of conspiracy theories, just give it a rest. I want real evidence. You can "prove" pretty much anything you want by appealing to conspiracies. Until you show me something that doesn't hinge on vague accusations and random correlations, you can't realy expect me to take you seriously.

Also you might want to check an impartial source:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aspartame_controversy

I haven't actually read the wikipedia article, but I feel confident that it does a good job of relaying the relevant info while dismissing all the bullshit. If I'm wrong, please let me know.

I would like to know just what constitutes a believable source to you?

A peer reviewed study which has been replicated by numerous independent sources, and has not been contradicted by any well-designed studies. That's pretty much the gold standard. I'm willing to bend, but you need to make a damn good case for why your evidence doesn't meet those standards.

Reminds me of the global warming denial.

Yeah, the nature-nuts do have a lot in common with the anti-AGW folks, don't they? Relying on a handful of "experts" and a bunch of anecdotes, in the face of overwhelming evidence to the contrary. Nice example!

If you could provide that list of countries with a lack of diabetes, and the substances they banned (like I keep asking), that would be wonderful. Or just admit you were making it up, so we can dismiss your initial point and move on.

about a year ago
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Murder Is Like a Disease (No, Really)

c6gunner Re:Most human problems result from human behavior (299 comments)

That's not actually accurate. First of all, there are LOTS of professionals against the use of HFCS.

Sure, and there are a lot of professionals who are cranks. What matters is what the science/evidence shows.

It isn't even corn syrup.

That's technically accurate, and thanks for the correction.

Also, HFCS isn't as sweet as real sugar or any of the alternatives such as stevia. This means in order to get the desired flavor, they have to add lots more of it. And that's part of the draw. Not only is it a sweetener, it is also a filler.

It's not a filler - it's a sweetener. It doesn't add bulk, it just adds calories. The lettuce on your BLT is a filler - it adds bulk without (much) calories.

The "meat" at taco bell, for example, has so many fillers added, it can't even be considered meat. I'm not compaining about taco bell... I like it actually.

Heh. Well I'm not a big fan of Taco Bell. Only thing I like there is their "Fries Supreme", and apparently that's not even sold in the US. But I'd like to see some evidence for your claim. Because taco bell claims otherwise:

http://www.tacobell.com/nutrition/foodfacts/BeefQuality

The relevant bit:
"After cooking our 100% premium beef, we remove and drain off excess fat. Then we add water for moisture, along with our signature blend of 12 authentic seasonings, spices, and other ingredients - much the same way you prepare taco meat at home."

Of course, they could be lying, but given all the myths that get passed around about fast-food, I'm more likely to side with them than with you. Some evidence to support your position would be wonderful.

In contrast, try comparing Dr. Pepper ... CocaCola imported from Mexico ... HFCS is less sweet and contains a much larger ratio in the mix.

Taste is entirely subjective, so I'm not going to go into that. It has no relevance to the health claims, anyway.

Look, I really don't want to get drawn into extended back-and-forth Fisking. I didn't read all of your links, because the first one seemed questionable on the face of it. I picked one semi-randomly, and it was the Mayo article (almost always a credible source). Here is what that article says:

"At this time, there's insufficient evidence to say that high-fructose corn syrup is any less healthy than other types of sweeteners. We do know, however, that too much added sugar â" not just high-fructose corn syrup â" can contribute unwanted calories that are linked to health problems, such as weight gain, type 2 diabetes, metabolic syndrome and high triglyceride levels. All of these boost your risk of heart disease. "

That is the crux of what I said earlier. It's calories in vs. calories out. That right there is the biggest issue with Americans. You eat more calories on average than other nations, and you get less exercise than many. The excessive use of HFCS is a part of that, but the insane size of your portions is - in my opinion - equally responsible. Regardless of the individual contributing factors, the real cause of diabetes is (as I already stated) excessive caloric consumption, and poor fitness. Blaming it on "preservatives" and "additives" is silly - the only thing you need to look at is how many calories are in the average persons daily intake, and how much exercise they get.

Of course, the quality of a diet is important when it comes to other considerations - you require certain nutrients and vitamins which you might not get if you eat junk food all the time. But that also has nothing to do with diabetes, and, even in that case, blaming "preservatives" and "additives" would be ridiculous.

Just to be fair, I did go check out one of your crank websites too; the list of "10 worst food ingredients" is full of the same kind of nonsense as the anti-HFCS arguments. I think it's particularly hilarious that the people who are arguing against HFCS because it provides too many calories are also arguing against aspertame, which provides no calories at all. However, this discussion is getting long enough as it is without getting drawn into 10 new things, so I'll refrain from commenting on the rest.

I asked you earlier for a list of some of the "banned substances" which help other nations avoid diabetes. You didn't really respond to that. If you can give me an actual list of example nations which have lower rates, along with the substances which they ban, I'd be happy to have a look. If you're just going to throw more random half-baked websites at me, then we should probably just call it a night!

about a year ago
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Murder Is Like a Disease (No, Really)

c6gunner Re:Most human problems result from human behavior (299 comments)

Learn about HFCS and why it is preferred by manufacturers over natural sugar but also why it doesn't work so well within the human body pushing internal organs beyond natural tollerance.

I know all about it. The only claims made about it's "dangers" are pushed by ... well, "cranks" would be the less offensive term. There's certainly no credible scientific data that suggests any inherent harm in corn syrup. The only real harm is the excessive use of sugar, period. HFCS has made it cheap to add sugar to all kinds of things, and our diets have become more sweetened - and, therefore, more calorie-dense - as a result. Replace HFCS with any other type of sugar at the same price, and the health effects would remain.

I didn't say only preservatives, however. Nice of you to omit parts of what I said to make it more convenient to draw your incorrect conclusion. Do you follow maps in the same way without getting lost?

Well now you're just being a dick. If you made any other "links", I didn't see them. I can't respond to what I don't see - you can blame that on your inability to communicate, or on my eeeevil plan to make you look ridiculous; I guess the latter is more satisfying?

Diabetes is caused by over consumption. But also by the ingredients in the foods we eat.

Ok, which ingredients? Names and evidence, please.

In countries where many of the ingredients found in foods in the US are banned or limited, they have a much lower rate of diabetes.

True. Also, in countries where they don't have you, diabetes rates are much lower. I guess we can conclude that you cause diabetes?

about a year ago
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Murder Is Like a Disease (No, Really)

c6gunner Re:Careful you don't run afoul (299 comments)

Just as an example, the last time the UK homicide rate was as high as it is currently in the USA was at the end of the 17th century.

That's true, but I don't think it shows what you want it to show. It rather tends to prop up the anti-gun-control position. After all, the UK murder rate in the 1800's was generally less than 2 per 100,000, even though gun control was non-existent. The first real gun laws were passed around the end of that century, and even then, there was no control on the sale/purchase of firearms - they simply started requiring that you have a license in order to carry a weapon in public.

Those numbers tend to suggest that there are other factors which are responsible for the high rate of homicide in the US.

Also, it's interesting to note that the homicide rate in the US has pretty much mirrored the rates in Europe. In the 1600/1700's it was around 40 per 100,000, and has declined over time, with some hiccups here and there.

about a year ago
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Murder Is Like a Disease (No, Really)

c6gunner Re:Periodically Legalize Murder (299 comments)

Some people are just asking to be killed and the only thing keeping them alive is this silly law that says you can't kill them. I think that maybe every 10 years or so we should just legalize murder for a month or two. Let's give everyone the opportunity to go out and whack somebody. I'll bet that 99.99% of the people who get killed will be people that the world will be better off without.

Given the disparity in gun ownership (and proficiency in the use of firearms) between the two political parties in the US, I'm thinking this would turn out very positive for one side ... not so much for the other.

about a year ago
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Murder Is Like a Disease (No, Really)

c6gunner Re:Most human problems result from human behavior (299 comments)

We want to save money, for example. In business, we want to lose less money so, in food production, they add preservatives or use ingredients with longer shelf lives.

Well, no, actually, people want to pay lower prices. Manufacturers don't lose money - they pass the cost on to the consumer. Sure, an individual farmer might go out of business if his entire crop goes tits-up, but a large corporation just ends up with a lower supply, and you end up paying a higher price for your carrots. Humans didn't invent preservatives so that businesses could save money - we invented them because we, as individuals:

1. Wanted our food to last longer, so we'd have less spoilage.
2. Prefer to pay lower prices at the market, which encourages our suppliers to also limit spoilage.

Having spent my childhood in a country where we often bottled/canned our own food, I can tell you we were quite happy to get our hands on whatever preservatives we could. Feeding the family was expensive enough without having to worry about whether half your supplies would go bad in a month. It's not until you're rich, fat, and happy, that you can start demonizing those big bad corporations and their horrible toxins. I can't think of a better example of White People's Problems.

 

The consequence of this falls to the consumer and back to society as a whole as it deals with increases in health problems such as diabetes.

Preservatives cause diabetes? Wow, who knew! Silly me - I thought it was a split between a genetic predisposition, and an adult-onset disease caused by poor fitness and over-consumption.

To say murder is "like a disease" is to fail to see the over-all pattern of human behaviors... the causes which lead to effects which lead to more causes and more effects.

Sure, except "cause and effect" is a completely different thing. When I hit a light-bulb with a hammer, the light-bulb breaks. That's cause and effect, but it's certainly not analogous to a disease. What they're talking about here is a pattern of diffusion, with factors which prevent a spread into some areas, while other factors encourage spread into others. If your idea of modeling the spread of disease is just "well, this one guy coughed on me and then I got sick", then yes, the simplistic cause-and-effect model makes sense to you; however, what's being proposed here is something quite a bit more nuanced, and potentially a LOT more useful.

about a year ago
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Congressional Committee Casts a Harsh Eye On Vaccination Science

c6gunner Re:Really, Really, I call BS on your science... (858 comments)

My problem is when they can feel free to "mandate" with gaps in knowledge, but then "refuse" over gaps in knowledge.

Totally. Like, we can't prove that god doesn't send you to hell for wearing a seatbelt, but they mandate wearing seatbelts anyway! And we can't prove that the christian god isn't the only one true god, yet, despite that, they refuse to mandate forced conversion to christiaity! The nerve of those people.

If you're new to the concepts of probability and uncertainty, I suggest taking a few college courses. The rest of us are quite comfortable evaluating each case based on the inherent risks and benefits.

about a year ago
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Congressional Committee Casts a Harsh Eye On Vaccination Science

c6gunner Re:SAY NOTHING (858 comments)

He said it shouldn't be a choice, and he's absolutely right. Medical exemption is not a choice - it's an exemption granted by a qualified medical practitioner. The reason vaccination shouldn't be a choice is exactly because of exceptions like your son; herd immunity allows us to makes such exceptions, and still keep him safe. If we end up breaking herd-immunity, people with legitimate issues are the ones who are most likely to be harmed.

about a year ago
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Congressional Committee Casts a Harsh Eye On Vaccination Science

c6gunner Re:God damn it (858 comments)

Kucinich has been a 9/11 denier for most of the last decade, along with pushing all kinds of other crazy conspiracy theories about mind-control satellites and chemtrails and such. The lunatic even proposed a bill that would ban "psychotronic" devices that are "directed at individual persons or targeted populations for the purpose of ... mood management, or mind control." He's a less-vocal version of Jessie Ventura. Why in the world would you ever have had any respect for him?

about a year ago
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Startram — Maglev Train To Low Earth Orbit

c6gunner Re:cost, $60 billion? (356 comments)

The estimates assumes Ugandan labor, Chinese materials, and Pakistani tech-support.

more than 2 years ago
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LSD Can Treat Alcoholism

c6gunner Re:Go figure (346 comments)

:p

Like I said, I love you conspiracy morons :) Can you talk some more about how I'm "up-modding my comments"? That was particularly funny :D

more than 2 years ago
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LSD Can Treat Alcoholism

c6gunner Re:Go figure (346 comments)

Real answer to your question: I've never done LSD.

Oh. I'm sorry. Must be genetic.

more than 2 years ago
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LSD Can Treat Alcoholism

c6gunner Re:Go figure (346 comments)

Thanks for pointing it all out to me. Now that you have enlightened me, I think I will go sulk in a corner and reflect on my views of the FDA, which are all obviously conspiracy theories.

You're welcome! I'm glad I could help. But you didn't answer the question :(

more than 2 years ago
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LSD Can Treat Alcoholism

c6gunner Re:Go figure (346 comments)

I love conspiracy morons :) You always brighten up my day!

Tell me, were you this way BEFORE taking LSD? Or did this behavior only manifest afterwards?

more than 2 years ago
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LSD Can Treat Alcoholism

c6gunner Re:Go figure (346 comments)

As for FDA approval.. have you EVER watched a commercial for an FDA approved drug? Nice, harmless side-effects like cancer, organ failure, Stevens-Johnson Syndrome, blindness, heart failure, brain damage, impotency, birth defects, peripheral neuropathy, weight gain, weight loss, coma, death.

That's just ignorant, man. If LSD was put through the hoops by the FDA and then placed on the market, it would most likely have an even longer list of side effects. Why? Because if a enough people in a sample group develop a particular condition, it gets listed as a "possible side effect" regardless of whether there's any reason to suspect that the treatment caused it. Compound that with the fact that ANY drug is bound to have an adverse side-effect in at least a small percentage of the population, and you end up with scary looking lists that poorly informed people love to trot out in order to "prove" that their drug of choice is much safer than the stuff on the market. Whereas your dealer, unfortunately, doesn't provide an FDA-approved list to go with your narcotics.

more than 2 years ago
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What To Do About an Asteroid That Has a 1 In 625 Chance of Hitting Us In 2040?

c6gunner Re:I will be doing one thing about it. (412 comments)

Yeah, you're right. I got my numbers wrong. Where I wrote 10 it should be 40, and 20 should be 80. Whoops. A wee bit of a difference there.

Given the land-area of Delhi, that actually means it would be pretty much entirely annihilated. 10-12 million casualties in the city - dropping off as you get into the outlying areas. 100 million is still a bit much, but 15-20 million wouldn't be inconceivable, if it hits the right place.

Scary. Thanks for making me recheck my figures.

more than 2 years ago
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What To Do About an Asteroid That Has a 1 In 625 Chance of Hitting Us In 2040?

c6gunner Re:Idiots! (412 comments)

The Mayan calendar was more accurate... 365.2420 days, vs. Gregorians 365.2425, when the actual value was 365.2422.

Ugh. Every time I see garbage like this modded insightful, I loose a little more hope for my fellow slashdotters. Goddammit people, when you read something and think "huh, I didn't know that!", your first reaction should be to look it up, NOT to hit the "mod insightful" button!

Here's a link to a book that talks about where that claim originated, and why it's wrong. Link should take you to the relevant page, but, just in case, it's "Early Astronomy" by Hugh Thurston, page 202/203.

For those too lazy to read it, here's the tl;dr version: the Mayan calendar is 365 days. It has no leap days or leap years. While there's evidence that the Mayans knew that the solar year was longer than 365 days, their calendar doesn't reflect that knowledge. The original claim was made by a guy who died in 1931, and he got his conclusion by making some silly mathematical mistakes.

more than 2 years ago

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